Article 400 – Goals and Objectives

Operational Services
Goals and Objectives

The Board of Education recognizes the importance of sound business management and views it as essential to the main purpose of the schools – the education of children. The Board serves as trustee of all business operations and facilities and accepts the responsibility of engaging them to promote the educational goals of the community.
With the assistance of the Superintendent and personnel designated by him/her, the Board shall establish efficient, businesslike, and ethical procedures for fiscal accounting, purchasing, and management of equipment and supplies; and a thorough, effective, and economical maintenance program that ensures the safe and useful life of school sites, plants, and equipment.
The Board recognizes that the entire school program hinges on the District’s ability to manage money. To manage it as effectively as possible, the Board subscribes to the following fiscal objectives:

  1. To encourage advanced planning through best practices in budgeting;
  2. To explore all practical and legal sources of dollar income;
  3. To guide the expenditures of funds to achieve the greatest educational returns;
  4. To require maximum efficiency and the highest ethical standards in accounting and reporting procedures; and
  5. To maintain the level of per pupil expenditure needed to provide the highest quality of education the community will support.

POLICY ADOPTED: February 17, 1986
POLICY AMENDED: November 15, 2011

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Article 405 – Fiscal and Business Management

Operational Services
Fiscal and Business Management

The Superintendent is responsible for the School District’s fiscal and business management. This responsibility includes annually preparing and presenting the District’s statement of affairs to the School Board and publishing it before December 1 as required by State law.

The Superintendent shall ensure the efficient and cost-effective operation of the District’s business management using computers, computer software, data management, communication systems, and electronic networks, including electronic mail, the Internet, and security systems. Each person using the District’s electronic network shall agree to the District’s current “Acceptable Use Policy”.

Budget Planning
The District’s fiscal year is from July 1 until June 30. The Superintendent shall present to the Board, no later than the first regular meeting in August, a tentative budget with appropriate explanation. This budget shall represent the culmination of an ongoing process of planning for the fiscal support needed for the District’s educational program. The District’s budget shall be entered upon the Illinois State Board of Education’s “School District Budget Form.” To the extent possible, the tentative budget shall be balanced as defined by the State Board of Education guidelines. The Superintendent shall complete a tentative deficit reduction plan if one is required by the State Board of Education guidelines.

Preliminary Adoption Procedures
After receiving the Superintendent’s proposed budget, the Board sets the date, place, and time for:

  1. A public hearing on the proposed budget; and
  2. The proposed budget to be available to the public for inspection.

The Board Secretary, or designee shall arrange to publish a notice in a local newspaper stating the date, place, and time of the proposed budget’s availability for public inspection and the public hearing.  The proposed budget shall be available for public inspection at least 30 days before the time of the budget hearing.

At the public hearing, the proposed budget shall be reviewed, and the public shall be invited to comment, question, or advise the Board.

Final Adoption Procedures
The Board adopts a budget before the end of the first quarter of each fiscal year (September 30) or by such alternative procedure as State law may define. To the extent possible, the budget shall be balanced as defined by the State Board of Education; if not balanced, the Board will adopt a deficit reduction plan to balance the District’s budget within 3 years according to State Board of Education requirements.

The Board adopts the budget by roll call vote. The budget resolution shall be incorporated into the meeting’s official minutes. Board members’ names voting yea and nay shall be recorded in the minutes.

The Superintendent or designee shall perform each of the following:

  1. Post the District’s final annual budget, itemized by receipts and expenditures, on the District’s Internet website, and notify parents/guardians that it is posted and provide the website’s address;
  2. File a certified copy of the budget resolution and an estimate of revenues by source anticipated to be received in the following fiscal year, certified by the District’s Chief Fiscal Officer, with the County Clerk within 30 days of the budget’s adoption;
  3. Make all preparations necessary for the Board to timely file its Certificate of Tax Levy, including preparations to comply with the Truth in Taxation Act, and file the Certificate of Tax Levy with the County Clerk or Clerks on or before the last Tuesday in December (the Certificate lists the amount of property tax money to be provided for the various funds in the budget); and
  4. Submit the annual budget, a deficit reduction plan if one is required by State Board of Education guidelines, and other financial information to the State Board of Education according to its requirements.

Any amendments to the budget or Certificate of Tax Levy shall be made as provided in The School Code and Truth in Taxation Act.

Budget Amendments
The Board may amend the budget by the same procedure as provided for in the original adoption.

Implementation
The Superintendent or designee shall implement the District’s budget and provide the Board with a monthly financial report that includes all deficit fund balances. The amount budgeted as the expenditure in each fund is the maximum amount that may be expended for that category, except when a transfer of funds is authorized by the Board.

The Board shall act on:

  • All interfund loans;
  • Interfund transfers;
  • Transfers within funds; and
  • Transfers from the working cash fund or abatements of it, if one exists.

LEGAL REF.:  35 ILCS 200/18-55 et seq.
105 ILCS 5/10-17, 5/10-22.33, 5/17-1, 5/17-1.2, 5/17-2A, 5/17-3.2, 5/17-11,
5/20-5, 5/20-8, and 5/20-10.
23 Ill.Admin.Code Part 100.

POLICY APPROVED: November 17, 2005
POLICY AMENDED: November 15, 2011

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Article 406 – Identity Protection

Operational Services
Identity Protection

The collection, storage, use, and disclosure of social security numbers by the School District shall be consistent with State and federal laws. The goals for managing the District’s collection, storage, use, and disclosure of social security numbers are to:

  1. Limit all activities involving social security numbers to those circumstances that are authorized by State or federal law.
  2. Protect each social security number collected or maintained by the District from unauthorized disclosure.

The Superintendent is responsible for ensuring that the District complies with the Identity Protection Act, 5 ILCS 179/. Compliance measures shall include each of the following:

  1. All employees having access to social security numbers in the course of performing their duties shall be trained to protect the confidentiality of social security numbers. Training should include instructions on the proper handling of information containing social security numbers from the time of collection through the destruction of the information.
  2. Only employees who are required to use or handle information or documents that contain social security numbers shall have access to such information or documents.
  3. Social security numbers requested from an individual shall be provided in a manner that makes the social security number easily redacted if the record is required to be released as part of a public records request.
  4. When collecting a social security number or upon request by an individual, a statement of the purpose(s) for which the District is collecting and using the social security number shall be provided.
  5. All employees must be advised of this policy’s existence and a copy of the policy must be made available to each employee. The policy must also be made available to any member of the public, upon request.

No District employee shall collect, store, use, or disclose an individual’s social security number unless specifically authorized by the Superintendent.

LEGAL REF.: 5 ILCS 179/, Identity Protection Act.

POLICY APPROVED: November 15, 2011

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Article 408 – Fund Balances

Operational Services
Fund Balances

The Superintendent or designee shall maintain fund balances adequate to ensure the District’s ability to maintain levels of service and pay its obligations in a prompt manner in spite of unforeseen events or unexpected expenses. The Superintendent or designee shall inform the Board whenever the District must draw upon its reserves or borrow money.
The School District seeks to maintain year-end fund balances no less than the range of 15-20 percent of the annual expenditures in each fund.

POLICY ADOPTED: November 17, 2011

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Article 410.04 – Revenue and Investments

Operational Services
Revenue and Investments

Revenue
The Superintendent or designee is responsible for making all claims for property tax revenue, State Aid, special State funds for specific programs, federal funds, and categorical grants.

Investments
The Superintendent shall either appoint a Chief Investment Officer or serve as one. The Chief Investment Officer shall invest money that is not required for current operations, in accordance with this policy and State law.

The Chief Investment Officer and Superintendent shall use the standard of prudence when making investment decisions. They shall use the judgment and care, under circumstances then prevailing, that persons of prudence, discretion, and intelligence exercise in the management of their own affairs, not for speculation, but for investment, considering the safety of their capital as well as its probable income.

Investment Objectives
The objectives for the School District’s investment activities are:

  1. Safety of Principal – Every investment is made with safety as the primary and over-riding concern. Each investment transaction shall ensure that capital loss, whether from credit or market risk, is avoided.
  2. Liquidity – The investment portfolio shall provide sufficient liquidity to pay District obligations as they become due. In this regard, the maturity and marketability of investments shall be considered.
  3. Rate of Return – The highest return on investments is sought, consistent with the preservation of principal and prudent investment principles.
  4. Diversification – The investment portfolio is diversified as to materials and investments, as appropriate to the nature, purpose, and amount of the funds.

Authorized Investments
The Chief Investment Officer may invest District funds in one or more of the following:

    1. Bonds, notes, certificates of indebtedness, treasury bills, or other securities now or hereafter issued, that are guaranteed by the full faith and credit of the United States of America as to principal and interest.
    2. Bonds, notes, debentures, or other similar obligations of the United States of America, its agencies, and its instrumentalities.

The term “agencies of the United States of America” includes: (i) the federal land banks, federal intermediate credit banks, banks for cooperative, federal farm credit banks, or any other entity authorized to issue debt obligations under the Farm Credit Act of 1971 and Acts amendatory thereto, (ii) the federal home loan banks and the federal home loan mortgage corporation, and (iii) any other agency created by Act of Congress.

  1. Interest-bearing savings accounts, interest-bearing certificates of deposit or interest-bearing time deposits or any other investments constituting direct obligations of any bank as defined by the Illinois Banking Act.
  2. Short term obligations of corporations organized in the United States with assets exceeding $500,000,000 if: (i) such obligations are rated at the time of purchase at one of the 3 highest classifications established by at least 2 standard rating services and that mature not later than 270 days from the date of purchase, (ii) such purchases do not exceed 10% of the corporation’s outstanding obligations, and (iii) no more than one-third of the District’s funds may be invested in short term obligations of corporations.
  3. Money market mutual funds registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940, provided that the portfolio of any such money market mutual fund is limited to obligations described in paragraph (1) or (2) and to agreements to repurchase such obligations.
  4. Short term discount obligations of the Federal National Mortgage Association or in shares or other forms of securities legally issuable by savings banks or savings and loan associations incorporated under the laws of this State or any other state or under the laws of the United States. Investments may be made only in those savings banks or savings and loan associations, the shares, or investment certificates that are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Any such securities may be purchased at the offering or market price thereof at the time of such purchase. All such securities so purchased shall mature or be redeemable on a date or dates prior to the time when, in the judgment of the Chief Investment Officer, the public funds so invested will be required for expenditure by the District or its governing authority.
  5. Dividend-bearing share accounts, share certificate accounts, or class of share accounts of a credit union chartered under the laws of this State or the laws of the United States; provided, however, the principal office of any such credit union must be located within the State of Illinois. Investments may be made only in those credit unions the accounts of which are insured by applicable law.
  6. A Public Treasurers’ Investment Pool created under Section 17 of the State Treasurer Act. The District may also invest any public funds in a fund managed, operated, and administered by a bank, subsidiary of a bank, or subsidiary of a bank holding company or use the services of such an entity to hold and invest or advise regarding the investment of any public funds.
  7. The Illinois School District Liquid Asset Fund Plus.
  8. Repurchase agreements of government securities having the meaning set out in the Government Securities Act of 1986, as now or hereafter amended or succeeded, subject to the provisions of said Act and the regulations issued there under. The government securities, unless registered or inscribed in the name of the District, shall be purchased through banks or trust companies authorized to do business in the State of Illinois.Except for repurchase agreements of government securities that are subject to the Government Securities Act of 1986, as now or hereafter amended or succeeded, the District may not purchase or invest in instruments that constitute repurchase agreements, and no financial institution may enter into such an agreement with or on behalf of the District unless the instrument and the transaction meet all of the following requirements:
    1. The securities, unless registered or inscribed in the name of the District, are purchased through banks or trust companies authorized to do business in the State of Illinois.
    2. The Chief Investment Officer, after ascertaining which firm will give the most favorable rate of interest, directs the custodial bank to “purchase” specified securities from a designated institution. The “custodial bank” is the bank or trust company, or agency of government, that acts for the District in connection with repurchase agreements involving the investment of funds by the District. The State Treasurer may act as custodial bank for public agencies executing repurchase agreements.
    3. A custodial bank must be a member bank of the Federal Reserve System or maintain accounts with member banks. All transfers of book-entry securities must be accomplished on a Reserve Bank’s computer records through a member bank of the Federal Reserve System. These securities must be credited to the District on the records of the custodial bank and the transaction must be confirmed in writing to the District by the custodial bank.
    4. Trading partners shall be limited to banks or trust companies authorized to do business in the State of Illinois or to registered primary reporting dealers.
    5. The security interest must be perfected.
    6. The District enters into a written master repurchase agreement that outlines the basic responsibilities and liabilities of both buyer and seller.
    7. Agreements shall be for periods of 330 days or less.
    8. The Chief Investment Officer informs the custodial bank in writing of the maturity details of the repurchase agreement.
    9. The custodial bank must take delivery of and maintain the securities in its custody for the account of the District and confirm the transaction in writing to the District. The custodial undertaking shall provide that the custodian takes possession of the securities exclusively for the District; that the securities are free of any claims against the trading partner; and that any claims by the custodian are subordinate to the District’s claims to rights to those securities.
    10. The obligations purchased by the District may only be sold or presented for redemption or payment by the fiscal agent bank or trust company holding the obligations upon the written instruction of the Chief Investment Officer.
    11. The custodial bank shall be liable to the District for any monetary loss suffered by the District due to the failure of the custodial bank to take and maintain possession of such securities.
  9. Any investment as authorized by the Public Funds Investment Act, and Acts amendatory thereto. Paragraph 11 supersedes paragraphs 1-10 and controls in the event of conflict.

Except as provided herein, investments may be made only in banks, savings banks, savings and loan associations, or credit unions that are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or other approved share insurer.

Selection of Depositories, Investment Managers, Dealers, and Brokers
The Chief Investment Officer shall establish a list of authorized depositories, investment managers, dealers and brokers based upon the creditworthiness, reputation, minimum capital requirements, qualifications under State law, as well as a long history of dealing with public fund entities. The Board will review and approve the list at least annually.

In order to be an authorized depository, each institution must submit copies of the last 2 sworn statements of resources and liabilities or reports of examination that the institution is required to furnish to the appropriate State or federal agency. Each institution designated as a depository shall, while acting as such depository, furnish the District with a copy of all statements of resources and liabilities or all reports of examination that it is required to furnish to the appropriate State or federal agency.

The above eligibility requirements of a bank to receive or hold public deposits do not apply to investments in an interest-bearing savings account, interest-bearing certificate of deposit, or interest-bearing time deposit if: (1) the District initiates the investment at or through a bank located in Illinois, and (2) the invested public funds are at all times fully insured by an agency or instrumentality of the federal government.

The District may consider a financial institution’s record and current level of financial commitment to its local community when deciding whether to deposit funds in that financial institution. The District may consider factors including:

  1. For financial institutions subject to the federal Community Reinvestment Act of 1977, the current and historical ratings that the financial institution has received, to the extent that those ratings are publicly available, under the federal Community Reinvestment Act of 1977;
  2. Any changes in ownership, management, policies, or practices of the financial institution that may affect the level of the financial institution’s commitment to its community;
  3. The financial impact that the withdrawal or denial of District deposits might have on the financial institution;
  4. The financial impact to the District as a result of withdrawing public funds or refusing to deposit additional public funds in the financial institution; and
  5. Any additional burden on the District’s resources that might result from ceasing to maintain deposits of public funds at the financial institution under consideration.

Collateral Requirements
All amounts deposited or invested with financial institutions in excess of any insurance limit shall be collateralized in accordance with the Public Funds Investment Act, 30 ILCS 235/. The Superintendent or designee shall keep the Board informed of collateral agreements.

Safekeeping and Custody Arrangements
The preferred method for safekeeping is to have securities registered in the District’s name and held by a third-party custodian. Safekeeping practices should qualify for the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement No. 3 Deposits with Financial Institutions, Investments (including Repurchase Agreements), and Reverse Repurchase Agreements, Category I, the highest recognized safekeeping procedures.

Controls and Report
The Chief Investment Officer shall establish a system of internal controls and written operational procedures to prevent losses arising from fraud, employee error, misrepresentation by third parties, or imprudent employee action.

The Chief Investment Officer shall, upon request, provide an investment report to the Board. The report will: (1) assess whether the investment portfolio is meeting the District’s investment objectives, (2) identify each security by class or type, book value, income earned, and market value, (3) identify those institutions providing investment services to the District, and (4) include any other relevant information. The investment portfolio’s performance shall be measured by appropriate and creditable industry standards for the investment type.

The Board will determine, after receiving the Superintendent’s recommendation, which fund is in most need of interest income and the Superintendent shall execute a transfer. This provision does not apply when the use of interest earned on a particular fund is restricted.

Ethics and Conflicts of Interest
The Board and District officials will avoid any investment transaction or practice that in appearance or fact might impair public confidence. Board members are bound by the Board Policy Article 240, Board Member Conflict of Interest. No District employee having influence on the District’s investment decisions shall:

  1. Have any interest, directly or indirectly, in any investments in which the District is authorized to invest,
  2. Have any interest, directly or indirectly, in the sellers, sponsors, or managers of those investments, or
  3. Receive, in any manner, compensation of any kind from any investments in that the agency is authorized to invest.

Investment Priority
Investment priority shall be given to the following institutions:
Blue Stem National Bank, Fairbury, Forrest, Illinois
Busey Bank of Fairbury, Fairbury, Illinois
Citizens Bank of Chatsworth, Chatsworth, Illinois
Fairbury-Cropsey Community Bank, Cropsey, Fairbury, Illinois
First State Bank of Forrest, Forrest, Fairbury, Illinois
Heartland Bank and Trust, Chenoa, Illinois
State Bank of Graymont, Chenoa, Illinois
Vermilion Valley Bank, Chatsworth, Illinois

LEGAL REF.: 30 ILCS 235/1 et seq.
105 ILCS 5/8-7, 5/10-22.44, 5/17-1, and 5/17-11.

POLICY APPROVED: November 17, 2005
POLICY AMENDED:  November 15, 2011

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Article 410.05 – Fiscal Management – Depositories

Operational Services
Fiscal Management – Depositories

The system of accounts shall provide for the appropriate separation of accounts, funds, and monies as prescribed by the State and Federal authorities. The Board designates the following depositories:

General Checking Account: Bluestem National Bank, Fairbury, Forrest, Illinois

Activity Fund Account: First State Bank of Forrest, Forrest, Fairbury, Illinois

POLICY READOPTED: January 22, 1996
POLICY AMENDED: November 15, 2011

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Article 410.06 – Incurring Debt

Operational Services
Incurring Debt

The Superintendent shall provide early notice to the School Board of the District’s need to borrow money. The Superintendent or designee shall prepare all documents and notices necessary for the Board, at its discretion, to: (1) issue State Aid Anticipation Certificates, tax anticipation warrants, working cash fund bonds, bonds, notes, and other evidence of indebtedness, or (2) establish a line of credit with a bank or other financial institution. The Superintendent shall notify the State Board of Education before the District issues any form of long-term or short-term debt that will result in outstanding debt that exceeds 75% of the debt limit specified in State law.

LEGAL REF.:        30 ILCS 305/2 and 352/1 et seq.
50 ILCS 420/5.
105 ILCS 5/17-16, 5/17-17, 5/18-18, and 5/19-1 et seq.

POLICY APPROVED: November 17, 2005
POLICY AMENDED:  November 15, 2011

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Article 410.07 – Fiscal Management – Gifts, Grants, and Bequests

Operational Services
Fiscal Management – Gifts, Grants, and Bequests

The Board may accept any gift, grant, or bequest of money or property on behalf of the District. While greatly appreciating suitable donations, the Board discourages gifts which may directly or indirectly impair its commitment to providing equal educational opportunities for all District students.

Before accepting a gift, the Board shall consider whether the gift:

  1. Has a purpose consistent with the District’s vision and philosophy;
  2. Begins a program which the Board would be unable to continue when the donated funds are exhausted;
  3. Entails undesirable or excessive costs; or
  4. Implies endorsement of any business or product.

The Board shall carefully evaluate any conditions or restrictions imposed by the donor in light of District philosophy and operations. If the Board feels the District will be unable to fully satisfy the donor’s conditions, the gift shall not be accepted.

Gift books and instructional materials shall be accepted only if they meet regular District criteria.

All gifts, grants, and bequests shall become District property. Donors are encouraged to donate all gifts to the District rather than to a particular school. At the Superintendent’s or designee’s discretion, a gift may be used at a particular school.

POLICY ADOPTED:   February 15, 1988
POLICY AMENDED:   November 15, 2011

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Article 410.08 – Purchase Approval Procedures of Booster and Parent-Teacher Organizations

Operational Services
Purchase Approval Procedures of Booster and Parent-Teacher Organizations

The Board of Education will approve all proposed purchases of recognized Booster and Parent-Teacher Organizations as part of its consent agenda.

The following are recognized Booster and Parent-Teacher Organizations:

  • Prairie Central Athletic Boosters
  • Prairie Central Music Boosters
  • Chatsworth Parent-Teacher Organization
  • Chenoa Elementary Parent-Teacher Organization
  • Meadowbrook Elementary Parent-Teacher Organization
  • Westview Elementary Parent-Teacher Organization
  • Prairie Central Upper Elementary Parent-Teacher Organization
  1. All potential requestors will be informed yearly of the procedures.
  2. All requests must be approved by the Athletic Director (if applicable), Principal, and Superintendent.
  3. The Athletic Director or Principal will inform requestors of the time lines needed for submitting a proposal.
  4. The Superintendent will present the request to the Board of Education for official approval (i.e. official Board action).
  5. Once the Board gives its approval, the Superintendent will notify the Principal or Athletic Director.
  6. The Athletic Director or Principal will submit the request to the appropriate Booster or Parent-Teacher Organization.
  7. If the Booster or Parent-Teacher Organization approves, a formal Board recognition will take place at the next meeting of the Board.
  8. The Athletic Director or Principal will submit the approval request on a District purchase order.

POLICY APPROVED: February, 1998
POLICY AMENDED:  November 15, 2011

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Article 410.16 – Activity Funds

Operational Services
Activity Funds

The Board, upon the Superintendent or designee’s recommendation, establishes student activity funds to be managed by student organizations under the guidance and direction of a staff member for educational, recreational, or cultural purposes.

The Superintendent or designee shall be responsible for supervising student activity funds in accordance with Board Policy Article 420, Accounting and Audits; State law; and the Illinois State Board of Education rules for student activity funds. The Board will appoint a treasurer for the fund to serve as the fund’s sole custodian and be bonded in accordance with the School Code. The treasurer shall have all of the responsibilities specific to the treasurer listed in the Illinois State Board of Education rules for school activity funds, including the authority to make loans between activity funds.

Unless otherwise instructed by the Board, a student activity fund’s balance will carry over to the next fiscal year. Unless an exception is granted by the Board, a fund that is inactive for 24 consecutive months shall be closed and its monies transferred to another student activity fund with a similar purpose.

LEGAL REF.: 105 ILCS 5/8-2 and 5/10-20.19.
23 Ill.Admin.Code §§100.20 and 100.80.

POLICY APPROVED: November 17, 2005
POLICY AMENDED: November 15, 2011

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Article 412 – Fundraising Activities

Operational Services
Fundraising Activities

Fundraising is the solicitation of funding for certain school projects and operations outside, beyond, or as a supplement to, the District’s budget. It may be performed only with Board of Education authorization and with the understanding that the Board is the exclusive overseer of any funds raised, and purchases made, through such activities for school-related purposes. Fundraising may be organized or conducted by groups such as parent-teacher and booster organizations, as per Article 875, Parent Organizations and Booster Clubs; other Board-authorized school organizations; school-community organizations; individuals; or staff members.

Fundraising activities must:

  1. Have a designated purpose, with all proceeds used for that purpose;
  2. Be consistent with the purposes of public education, the District, the school, or the program;
  3. Support the general welfare, a charitable cause, or the educational experiences of students generally;
  4. Not detract from the learning environment;
  5. Be voluntary for any participant;
  6. Comply with the Illinois State Board of Education rules concerning the sale of competitive food and beverage items;
  7. Support and protect students, staff, and other volunteers from legal liability through practices that promote accountability for the handling and management of proceeds;
  8. Be compliant with the U.S. and State Constitutions, Federal and State Law, and District Policy; and
  9. Not increase the District’s operating costs.

Donor Messages
Any fundraising efforts that solicit donor messages for incorporation into school property (e.g., tiles or bricks) or placement upon school property (e.g., posters or placards) must:

  1. Develop viewpoint-neutral guidelines for the creation of messages;
  2. Inform potential donors that all messages are subject to review and approval, and that messages that do not meet the established guidelines must be resubmitted or the donation will be returned; and
  3. Place a disclaimer on all fundraising information and near the completed donor messages that all messages are “solely the expression of the individual donors and not an endorsement by the District of any message’s content.”

Staff Member Fundraising

With the approval of District administration and the Board of Education, members of the staff may conduct fundraising campaigns, or self-fund, for school-, or classroom-related purposes.
Such activities, in addition to the aforementioned:

  1. Must not create inequity in curriculum or curriculum delivery;
  2. Must be part of an approved project, innovation, or pilot program; and,
  3. If part of a published campaign (e.g. posters, in newspapers or journals, radio or TV, internet sites), must only include wording or advertising authorized by District administration and Board of Education.

LEGAL REF.:        105 ILCS 5/10-20.19(3).
23 Ill.Admin.Code Part 305, School Food Service.

APPROVED:   August 18, 2016

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Article 415.01 – Payment Procedures

Operational Services
Payment Procedures

The Treasurer shall prepare a list of all due and payable bills, indicating vendor name and amount, and shall present it to the Board in advance of the Board’s first regular monthly meeting. These bills shall be reviewed by the Board, after which they may be approved for payment by Board order. Approval of all bills shall be given by a roll call vote and the votes shall be recorded in the minutes. The Treasurer shall pay the bills after receiving a Board order or pertinent portions of the Board minutes, even if the minutes are unapproved, provided the order or minutes are signed by the Board President and Secretary, or a majority of the Board.

The Treasurer is authorized to pay Social Security taxes and wages without further Board approval, pension contributions, utility bills, and other recurring bills. These disbursements shall be included in the listing of bills presented to the Board upon its request.

The Board authorizes the Superintendent or designee to establish revolving funds and a petty cash fund system for school cafeterias, lunchrooms, athletics, or similar purposes, provided such funds are maintained in accordance with Board Policy Article 420, Accounting and Audits, and remain in the custody of an employee who is properly bonded according to State law.

LEGAL REF.: 105 ILCS 5/8-16, 5/10-7, and 5/10-20.19.
23 Ill.Admin.Code §100.70.

POLICY APPROVED: November 17, 2005
POLICY AMENDED: November 15, 2011

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Article 415.01-E – Exhibit – School District Payment Order

Operational Services
Exhibit – School District Payment Order

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Article 415.03 – Purchases and Contracts

Operational Services
Purchases and Contracts

The Superintendent shall manage the District’s purchases and contracts in accordance with State law, the standards set forth in this policy, and other applicable School Board policies.

Standards for Purchasing and Contracting

All purchases and contracts shall be entered into in accordance with State law. The Board Attorney shall be consulted as needed regarding the legal requirements for purchases or contracts. All contracts shall be approved or authorized by the Board.
All purchases and contracts should support a recognized District function or purpose as well as provide for good quality products and services at the lowest cost, with consideration for service, reliability, and delivery promptness, and in compliance with State law. No purchase or contract shall be made or entered into as a result of favoritism, extravagance, fraud, or corruption.
Adoption of the annual budget authorizes the Superintendent or designee to purchase budgeted supplies, equipment, and services, provided that State law is followed. Purchases of items outside budget parameters require prior Board approval, except in an emergency.
When presenting a contract or purchase for Board approval, the Superintendent or designee shall ensure that it complies with applicable State law, including but not limited to, those specified below:

  1. Supplies, materials, or work involving an expenditure in excess of $25,000 must comply with the State law bidding procedure, 105 ILCS 5/10-20.21, unless specifically exempted.
  2. Construction, lease, or purchase of school buildings must comply with State law.
  3. Guaranteed energy savings must comply with 105 ILCS 5/19b-1 et seq.
  4. Third party non-instructional services must comply with 105 ILCS 5/10-22.34c.
  5. Goods and services that are intended to generate revenue and other remunerations for the District in excess of $1,000, including without limitation vending machine contracts, sports and other attire, class rings, and photographic services, must comply with 105 ILCS 5/10-20.21. The Superintendent or designee shall keep a record of: (1) each vendor, product, or service provided, (2) the actual net revenue and non-monetary remuneration from each contract or agreement, and (3) how the revenue was used and to whom the non-monetary remuneration was distributed. The Superintendent or designee shall report this information to the Board by completing the necessary forms that must be attached to the District’s annual budget.
  6. The purchase of paper and paper products must comply with 105 ILCS 5/10-20.19c.

The Superintendent or designee shall: (1) execute the reporting and website posting mandates in State law concerning District contracts, and (2) monitor the discharge of contracts, contractors’ performances, and the quality and value of services or products being provided.

LEGAL REF.:  105 ILCS 5/10-20.19c, 5/10-20.21, 5/10-22.34c, and 5/19b-1 et seq.
820 ILCS 130/.

POLICY APPROVED: November 17, 2005
POLICY AMENDED:  November 15, 2011

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Article 415.03-AP1 – Administrative Procedures – Purchases

Operational Services
Administrative Procedures – Purchases

The Board Attorney should be consulted, as needed, regarding the legal requirements presented by this administrative procedure as well as before a contract is presented to the Board.

Requirements for Purchases and Contracts

  1. Each of the following requirements describes the type of purchase and/or contract to which it applies; requirements in Sections B and C may also apply to a specific purchase or contract.
    1. All purchases of goods or services must be made through the use of contracts or purchase orders, except for those purchases made from petty cash funds or the Imprest Fund, or as otherwise specifically authorized by the Superintendent.
    2. Illinois Use Tax Act compliance (105 ILCS 5/10-20.21(b) and 35 ILCS 105):
      1. Persons bidding for and awarded a contract, and all affiliates of the person, must collect and remit Illinois Use Tax on all sales of tangible personal property into the State of Illinois in accordance with the provision of the Illinois Use Tax Act.
      2. All bids and contracts must include: (1) a certification that the bidder or contractor is not barred from bidding for or entering into a contract, and (2) an acknowledgment that the Board may declare the contract void if the certification is false.
    3. All entities seeking to enter into a contract with the District must provide written certification to the District that it will provide a drug free workplace by complying with the Illinois Drug Free Workplace Act, 30 ILCS 580. All contractors must comply with the notification mandates and other requirements in the Illinois Drug Free Workplace Act, 30 ILCS 580. “Contractor” is defined in the Drug Free Workplace Act as “a corporation, partnership, or other entity with 25 or more employees at the time of letting the contract, or a department, division, or unit thereof, directly responsible for the specific performance under a contract of $5,000 or more.”
    4. Before soliciting bids or awarding a contract for supplies, materials, equipment, or services, a certified education purchasing contract that is already available through a State education purchasing entity (as defined in the Education Purchasing Program, Article 28A of The School Code), may be considered as a bid (105 ILCS 5/10-20.21(d)).
    5. All contracts must include provisions required by State or federal law, as applicable. Topics commonly requiring a provision include equal opportunity employment, prevailing wage, minimum wage, and performance bond.
    6. The procurement of architectural, engineering, and land surveying services is governed by the Local Government Professional Services Selection Act, 50 ILCS 510.
    7. All contracts in excess of $25,000 and all contracts with an exclusive bargaining representative must be listed on the District’s website, if any. 105 ILCS 5/10-20.40. Each contract with an exclusive bargaining representative must be posted on the website, if any. 105 ILCS 5/10-20.50, amended by P.A. 96-434 and recodified by P.A. 96-1000.
  2. The following govern all purchases and/or the award of contracts for supplies, materials, or work, and/or contracts with private carrier for transporting students, involving: (a) an expenditure of $25,000 or less, or (b) in an emergency, an expenditure in excess of $25,000, provided such expenditure is approved by three-quarters of the Board.
    1. Telephone quotations, verbal quotations, or catalog prices are used to purchase materials that are needed urgently, or small quantity orders.
    2. Written quotations are used to purchase materials or services when time requirements allow. Whenever possible, quotations should be received from at least 2 competitors. The Superintendent or designee may negotiate with vendors at any time, including after receiving quotations.
  3. The following govern all purchases and/or the award of contracts involving an expenditure in excess of $25,000 for supplies, materials, or work, and/or contracts with private carriers for transporting students. 105 ILCS 5/10-20.21(a), amended by P.A. 96-392.
    1. Contracts are awarded to the lowest responsible bidder, considering conformity with specifications, terms of delivery, quality and serviceability, except contracts or purchases for:
      1. Services of individuals possessing a high degree of professional skill where the ability or fitness of the individual plays an important part;
      2. Printing of finance committee reports and departmental reports;
      3. Printing or engraving of bonds, tax warrants, and other evidences of indebtedness;
      4. Purchase of perishable foods and perishable beverages;
      5. Materials and work that have been awarded to the lowest responsible bidder after due advertisement, but due to unforeseen revisions, not the fault of the contractor for materials and work, must be revised causing expenditures not in excess of 10% of the contract price;
      6. Maintenance or servicing of, or provision of repair parts for, equipment which are made with the manufacturer or authorized service agent of that equipment where the provision of parts, maintenance, or servicing can best be performed by the manufacturer or authorized service agent;
      7. Use, purchase, delivery, movement, or installation of data processing equipment, software, or services and telecommunications and interconnect equipment, software, and services;
      8. Duplicating machines and supplies;
      9. Natural gas when the cost is less than that offered by a public utility;
      10. Equipment previously owned by some entity other than the District itself;
      11. Repair, maintenance, remodeling, renovation, or construction, or a single project involving an expenditure not to exceed $50,000 and not involving a change or increase in the size, type, or extent of an existing facility;
      12. Goods or services procured from another governmental agency;
      13. Goods or services that are economically procurable from only one source, such as for the purchase of magazines, books, periodicals, pamphlets and reports, and for utility services such as water, light, heat, telephone, or telegraph;
      14. Emergency expenditures when such an emergency expenditure is approved by three-quarters of the members of the Board;
      15. Goods procured through an education master contract, as defined in the Education Purchasing Program, Article 28A of The School Code; and
      16. Providing for the transportation of students with special needs or disabilities, which contracts must be advertised in the same manner as competitive bids and awarded by first considering the bidder(s) most able to provide safety and comfort for the students with special needs or disabilities, stability of service, and any other factors set forth in the request for proposal regarding quality of service, and then price.
    2. Competitive bidding process:
      1. An invitation for bids is advertised, where possible, by public notice at least 10 days before the bid date in a newspaper published in the District, or if no newspaper is published in the District, in a newspaper of general circulation in the area of the District. 105 ILCS 5/10-20.21(a).
      2. The following information should be included in the advertisement for bids:
        1. A description of the materials, supplies, or work involved;
        2. Completion or delivery date requirements;
        3. Requirements for bids, bonds, and/or deposits;
        4. Requirements for performance, labor, and material payment bonds;
        5. Date, time, and place of the bid opening;
        6. The approximate time period between the opening of bids and the award of the contract; and
        7. Any other useful information.
    3. If specifications are available, the advertisement for bids describes where they may be obtained and/or inspected.
    4. All bids must be sealed by the bidder. 105 ILCS 5/10-20.21(a).
    5. A Board member or District employee opens the bids at a public bid opening at which time the contents are announced. 105 ILCS 5/10-20.21(a). With the exception of bids for construction purposes, bids may be communicated, accepted, and opened electronically. The following safeguards apply to an electronic bid opening (105 ILCS 5/10-20.21, amended by P.A. 96-841):
      1. On the date and time of a bid opening, the primary person conducting the electronic bid process shall log onto a specified database using a unique username and password previously assigned to the bidder to allow access to the bidder’s specific bid project number.
      2. The specified electronic database must be on a network that: (i) is in a secure environment behind a firewall; (ii) has specific encryption tools; (iii) maintains specific intrusion detection systems; (iv) has redundant systems architecture with data storage back-up, whether by compact disc or tape; and (v) maintains a disaster recovery plan.
    6. Each bidder is given at least 3 days’ notice of the time and place of the bid opening. 105 ILCS 5/10-20.21(a).
  4. Following the opening of bids, the Superintendent (and Board Attorney, if needed) determines the lowest responsible bidder and verifies the bidders’ qualifications. Contracts are awarded at a properly called open meeting of the Board. If the Superintendent recommends a bidder other than the lowest bidder, the Superintendent must provide the Board with the factual basis for the recommendation in writing. The Board, if it accepts a bid from a bidder other than the lowest, records the factual basis for its decision in its minutes. A contract arises only when the Board votes to accept a bid, although written notice of the award will later be given to the successful bidder.
  5. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the District is relieved from bidding when making joint purchases with other public entities in compliance with the Governmental Joint Purchasing Act (30 ILCS 525/0.01).

LEGAL REF.: 30 ILCS 580/, Ill. Drug Free Workplace Act.
50 ILCS 510/, Local Government Professional Services Selection Act.
105 ILCS 5/10-20.21 and 5/10-20.40.

POLICY APPROVED: November 15, 2011

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Article 416 – Insufficient Funds Checks

Operational Services
Insufficient Funds Checks

The Superintendent or designee is responsible for collecting the maximum fee authorized by State law for returned checks written to the District that are not honored upon presentation to the respective bank or other depository institution for any reason. The Superintendent is authorized to contact the District’s attorney whenever necessary to collect the returned check amount, fee, collection costs and expenses, and interest.

LEGAL REF.: 810 ILCS 5/3-806.

POLICY APPROVED: November 17, 2005

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Article 416-AP – Administrative Procedure – Insufficient Funds Checks

Operational Services
Administrative Procedure – Insufficient Funds Checks

The following will occur whenever any individual writes a check to the District that is not honored upon presentation to the respective bank or other depository institution for any reason:

  1. The Superintendent or designee will contact the individual by telephone as soon as the check is returned to the District. The individual will be asked to pay the returned check and the $25.00 returned check fee.
  2. If the amount due is not paid after initial contact, the Superintendent or designee will send a letter by certified mail, return receipt requested, demanding payment within 30 days of mailing the letter.
  3. If the amount due is not paid within 30 days of mailing the demand letter, the Superintendent or designee will contact the school attorney for further collection action.

POLICY ADOPTED: June 18, 2001
POLICY AMENDED: November 15, 2011

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Article 420 – Accounting and Audits

Operational Services
Accounting and Audits

The School District’s accounting and audit services shall comply with the Illinois Program Accounting Manual, as adopted by the Illinois State Board of Education, and State law. The Superintendent, in addition to other assigned financial responsibilities, shall report monthly on the District’s financial performance, both income and expense, in relation to the financial plan represented in the budget.

Annual Audit
At the close of each fiscal year, the Superintendent shall arrange an audit of District funds, accounts, statements, and other financial matters. The audit shall be performed by an independent certified public accountant designated by the Board and be conducted in conformance with prescribed standards and legal requirements. A complete and detailed written audit report shall be provided to each Board member and to the Superintendent. The Superintendent shall annually, on or before October 15, submit an original and one copy of the audit to the Regional Superintendent of Schools.

Annual Financial Report
The Superintendent or designee shall annually prepare and submit the Annual Financial Report on a timely basis using the form adopted by the Illinois State Board of Education. The Superintendent shall review and discuss the Annual Financial Report with the Board before it is submitted.

Inventories
The Superintendent or designee is responsible for establishing and maintaining accurate inventory records that, at a minimum, comply with the Illinois Program Accounting Manual. The inventory record of equipment shall include such items as a description of each item, the quantity, the location, the date of purchase, and the cost or the estimated replacement cost.

Disposition of District Property
The Superintendent or designee shall notify the Board, as necessary, of the following so that the Board may consider its disposition: (1) District personal property (property other than buildings and land) that is no longer needed for school purposes, and (2) school sites, buildings, or other real estate that is unnecessary, unsuitable, or inconvenient. Notwithstanding the above, the Superintendent or designee may unilaterally dispose of personal property of a diminutive value.

Taxable Fringe Benefits
The Superintendent or designee shall: (1) require that all use of District property or equipment by employees is for the District’s convenience and best interests unless it is a Board-approved fringe benefit, and (2) ensure compliance with the Internal Revenue Service regulations regarding when to report an employee’s personal use of District property or equipment as taxable compensation.

Controls for Revolving Funds and Petty Cash
Revolving funds and the petty cash system are established in Board policy 450, Payment Procedures. The Superintendent shall: (1) designate a custodian for each revolving fund and petty cash fund, (2) obtain a bond for each fund custodian, and (3) maintain the funds in compliance with this policy, State law, and Illinois State Board of Education rules. A check for the petty cash fund may be drawn payable to the designated petty cash custodian. Bank accounts for revolving funds are limited to a maximum balance of $500.00. All expenditures from these bank accounts must be directly related to the purpose for which the account was established and supported with documentation, including signed invoices or receipts. All deposits into these bank accounts must be accompanied with a clear description of their intended purpose. The Superintendent or designee shall include checks written to reimburse revolving funds on the Board’s monthly listing of bills indicating the recipient and including an explanation.

Control Requirements for Checks
The Board must approve all bank accounts opened or established in the District’s or a District school’s name or with the District’s Federal Employer Identification Number. All checks issued by the School District must be signed by either the Treasurer or Board President, except that checks from an account containing student activity funds and revolving accounts may be signed by the respective account custodian.

Internal Controls
The Superintendent is primarily responsible for establishing and implementing a system of internal controls for safeguarding the District’s financial condition; the Board, however, will oversee these safeguards. The control objectives are to ensure efficient business and financial practices, reliable financial reporting, and compliance with State law and Board policies, and to prevent losses from fraud, employee error, misrepresentation by third parties, or imprudent employee action.

The Superintendent or designee shall annually audit the District’s financial and business operations for compliance with established internal controls and provide the results to the Board. The Board may from time-to-time engage a third-party to audit internal controls in addition to the annual audit.

LEGAL REF.: 105 ILCS 5/2-3.27, 5/2-3.28, 5/3-7, 5/3-15.1, 5/5-22, 5/10-21.4, 5/10-20.19, 5/10-22.8,
and 5/17-1 et seq.
23 Ill.Admin.Code Part 100.

POLICY APPOVED:  November 17, 2005
POLICY AMENDED:  November 15, 2011

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Article 420-AP – Administrative Procedure – Checklist for Internal Controls

Operational Services
Administrative Procedure – Checklist for Internal Controls

The District’s system of internal controls shall include the following:

  1. All financial transactions must be properly authorized and documented. This includes:
    • No check is issued without pre-approved documentation for the expenditure, e.g., a signed voucher, a completed and approved travel request, an approved purchase requisition, an order, or an invoice.
    • No bank account is opened or established in the District’s or a District school’s name or with the District’s Federal Employer Identification Number without pre-approved documentation.
    • Every receipt to and expenditure from a revolving fund and a petty cash fund are supported with clear documentation and otherwise comply with Board policies 415.01, Payment Procedures and 420, Accounting and Audits.
    • A record is made of all checks issued that includes descriptive information sufficient to allow assignment of the appropriate code.
  2. Financial records and data must be accurate and complete. This includes:
    • Data entries are timely made.
    • Cash handling is properly recorded.
    • Checks are sequentially numbered and missing checks are accounted for.
    • Financial reporting deadlines are followed.
  3. Accounts payable must be accurate and punctual. This includes:
    • Payments are made on a timely basis.
    • A thorough explanation is provided for any over/underpayments.
    • Payroll and benefits are reviewed and continually updated.
  4. District property must be protected from loss or misuse. This includes:
    • Valuable technology assets are safeguarded from theft or loss.
    • A backup and recovery system is developed for electronic systems.
    • Only authorized individuals have access to various systems.
    • Passwords are kept secure and frequently changed.
    • Keys are kept secure and accounted for.
    • District property is not borrowed or otherwise used for private purposes.
    • District personal property having a monetary value (excluding, for example, trash, out-dated equipment, consumed consumables, and spoilage) is discarded only with the Board’s prior approval.
  5. Incompatible duties should be segregated, if possible. This includes:
    • Transaction approval is separated from disbursement approval duties so that no single individual controls all phases of the claim payment process.
    • Other controls are used if segregation of duties is impossible.
  6. Accounting records are periodically reconciled. This includes:
    • All accounts are balanced monthly.
    • All statements from checking accounts and credit cards are reconciled monthly.
    • Expenses are verified against receipts.
    • Out-of-balance conditions are investigated.
  7. Equipment and supplies must be safeguarded. This includes:
    • Inventories are periodically taken and inspections are frequently made.
    • A reliable record is kept identifying what technology assets have been provided to specific employees.
    • Access to supplies is limited and controlled.
  8. Staff members with financial or business responsibilities must be properly trained and supervised, and must perform their responsibilities with utmost care and competence.
    • Responsibilities match job descriptions.
    • If required by State law, staff members are appropriately bonded.
    • Staff members are held accountable for complying with Board policies and administrative processes or procedures that have been established to safeguard the District’s financial condition.
    • Staff members are appropriately trained and evaluated.
    • Staff members are encouraged to notify their supervisors or the Superintendent of risks, losses, and/or concerns.
  9. Any unnecessary weaknesses or financial risks must be promptly corrected. This includes:
    • Internal control concerns raised by the District’s independent auditor in connection with the annual financial audit are properly addressed.
    • Internal or external auditors are annually engaged to assess risk and/or test existing internal controls for those areas not included within the scope of the annual financial audit; concerns are promptly addressed.

POLICY ADOPTED:   November 15, 2011

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Article 420.24 – Camps

Operational Services
Camps

It shall be the policy of Prairie Central Community Unit School District No. 8 that school coaches and sponsors are encouraged to conduct camps for the enhancement of student opportunities. The purpose of this Policy is to establish procedures for coaches and sponsors to follow when conducting camps utilizing School District facilities for music, art, band, athletics, cheerleading, and any other activities related to the school program. All such activities shall be considered school-related and school-sponsored events. No rent for use of school facilities shall be charged to coaches or sponsors employed by Prairie Central Community Unit School District No. 8.

Camp Proposals
At least sixty (60) days prior to the first day of the camp or, in the case of camps occurring during the summer, at least ninety (90) days before the last day of the school year, a coach or sponsor wishing to conduct a camp shall submit a written proposal to the Superintendent or his or her designee setting forth at least the following:

  • The complete schedule, including beginning and ending dates and daily hours of the camp;
  • Any eligibility requirements for participation in the camp;
  • A description of what instruction, services, and/or merchandise camp participants will receive;
  • A projected budget for the camp, including all revenues for fees or other receipts and estimated expenses, including any stipends to be paid to sponsors or coaches, associated with the camp; and
  • A list of all individuals who will be assisting the sponsor in supervising or conducting the camp.

The Superintendent or his or her designee shall review the proposal and, in his or her sole discretion, issue a written response, which shall:

  • Approve the proposal as presented;
  • Approve the proposal with specified modifications; or
  • Deny the proposal.

A coach or sponsor who is dissatisfied with the Superintendent’s response may appeal the decision to the Board of Education. The decision of the Board of Education shall be final.

Criminal Records Check
All coaches, sponsors and other individuals assisting in conducting or supervising the camp must submit evidence that they have completed a fingerprint-based criminal history records check, pursuant to Section 10-21.9 of the School Code, and have no record of conviction of any offense specified therein.

Moneys
All fees and other revenues collected to operate the camp shall be deposited in a School District activity account. Payment for vouchered expenses and approved stipends shall be disbursed by authorized School District personnel.

Camp Participants
All participants in camps shall provide the following prior to the start of the camp:

  • If under the age of 18, a written authorization to participate signed by the child’s parent or guardian;
  • Proof of medical insurance, providing coverage in the event the student is injured or becomes ill at camp; and,
  • For students participating in camps involving strenuous physical activity – including, but not limited to athletics, cheerleading, marching band evidence of a health examination conducted within the previous twelve (12) months by a physician licensed to practice medicine in all of its branches, an advance practice nurse who has a written collaborative agreement with a collaborative physician, or a physician’s assistant who has been delegated to perform health examinations by his or her supervising physician.

Policy adopted:  April 21, 2011

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Article 425 – Annuities

Operational Services
Annuities

Employees may participate in tax sheltered annuity programs through appropriate salary deductions. Before a salary deduction can be made, an employees must complete a signed agreement with a company approved by the Board, stating the effective date and the amount of the annuity to be deducted.

Companies may become part of the annuity program when the request is made by ten (10) employees who have signed a contract with the company.

POLICY READOPTED: January 17, 2000
POLICY AMENDED: November 15, 2011

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Article 430 – Commercial Insurance Management

Operational Services
Commercial Insurance Management

The Superintendent shall annually recommend an insurance program that provides the broadest and most complete coverage available at the most economical cost, consistent with sound insurance principles.
The insurance program shall include:

  1. Liability coverage to insure against any loss or liability of the School District and the listed individuals against civil rights damage claims and suits, constitutional rights damage claims and suits, and death and bodily injury and property damage claims and suits, including defense costs, when damages are sought for negligent or wrongful acts allegedly committed in the scope of employment or under the Board’s direction or related to any mentoring services provided to the District’s certified staff members; School Board members; employees; volunteer personnel authorized by 105 ILCS 5/10-22.34, 5/10-22.34a, and 5/10-22.34b; mentors of certified staff members authorized in 105 ILCS 5/21A-5 et seq. (new teacher), 105 ILCS 5/2-3.53a (new principal), and 2-3.53b (new superintendents); and student teachers.
  2. Comprehensive property insurance covering a broad range of causes of loss involving building and personal property. The coverage amount shall normally be for the replacement cost or the insurable value.
  3. Workers’ Compensation to protect individual employees against financial loss in case of a work-related injury, certain types of disease, or death incurred in an employee-related situation.

LEGAL REF.: Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act, P. L. 99-272, ¶ 1001, 100 Stat. 222, 4980B(f) of the I.R.S. Code, 42 U.S.C. §300bb-1 et seq.
105 ILCS 5/10-20.20, 5/10-22.3, 5/10-22.3a, 5/10-22.3b, 5/10-22.3f, 5/10-22.34, 5/10-22.34a, and 5/10-22.34b.
215 ILCS 5/1 et seq.
820 ILCS 305/1.

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Article 435 – Transportation

Operational Services
Transportation

The District shall provide free transportation for any student in the District who resides: (1) at a distance of one and one-half miles or more from his or her assigned school, unless the School Board has certified to the Illinois State Board of Education that adequate public transportation is available, or (2) within one and one-half miles from his or her assigned schools where walking to school or to a pick-up point or bus stop would constitute a serious hazard due to vehicular traffic or rail crossing, and adequate public transportation is not available. A student’s parent(s)/guardian(s) may file a petition with the Board of Education requesting transportation due to the existence of a serious safety hazard. Free transportation services and vehicle adaptation are provided for a special education student if included in the student’s individualized educational programs. Non-public school students shall be transported in accordance with State law. Homeless students shall be transported in accordance with the McKinney Homeless Assistance Act.

If a student is at a location within the District, other than his or her residence, for child care purposes at the time for transportation to and/or from school, that location may be considered for purposes of determining the 1½ miles from the school attended. Unless the Superintendent or designee establishes new routes, pick-up and drop-off locations for students in day care must be along the District’s regular routes. The District will not discriminate among types of locations where day care is provided, which may include the premises of licensed providers, relatives’ homes, or neighbors’ homes.

Bus schedules and routes shall be determined by the Superintendent or designee and shall be altered only with the Superintendent’s or designee’s approval and direction. In setting the routes, the pick-up and discharge points should be as safe for students as possible.

No school employee may transport students in school or private vehicles unless authorized by the administration.

Every vehicle regularly used for the transportation of students must pass safety inspections in accordance with State law and Illinois Department of Transportation regulations. The strobe light on a school bus may be illuminated any time a bus is bearing one or more students. The Superintendent shall implement procedures in accordance with State law for accepting comment calls about school bus driving.
All contracts for charter bus services must contain the clause prescribed by State law regarding criminal background checks for bus drivers.

Pre-Trip and Post-Trip Vehicle Inspection
The Superintendent or designee shall develop and implement a pre-trip and post-trip inspection procedure to ensure that the school bus driver: (1) tests the two-way radio and ensures that it is functioning properly before the bus is operated, and (2) walks to the rear of the bus before leaving the bus at the end of each route, work shift, or work day, to check the bus for children or other passengers in the bus.

LEGAL REF.: McKinney Homeless Assistance Act, 42 U.S.C. §11431 et seq.
105 ILCS 5/10-22.22 and 5/29-1 et seq.
105 ILCS 45/1-15.
625 ILCS 5/1-148.3a-5, 5/1-182, 5/11-1414.1, 5/12-813, 5/12-813.1, 5/12-815, 5/12-816, 5/12-821, and 5/13-109.
23 Ill.Admin.Code §§1.510 and 226.750; Part 120.
92 Ill.Admin.Code §440-3.

APPROVED: November 17, 2005
AMENDED: December 15, 2011

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Article 435-AP1 – Administrative Procedure – School Bus Post-Accident Checklist

Operational Services
Administrative Procedure – School Bus Post-Accident Checklist

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Article 435-AP2 – Administrative Procedure – Bus Driver Communication Devices; Pre-Trip and Post-Trip Inspection; and Bus Driving Comments

Operational Services
Administrative Procedure – Bus Driver Communication Devices; Pre-Trip and Post-Trip Inspection; and Bus Driving Comments

Bus Driver Communication Devices
State law prohibits a school bus driver from operating a school bus while using a cellular radio telecommunication device. It requires each school bus to contain either an operating cellular radio telecommunication device or two-way radio while the school bus driver is in possession of the school bus. The cellular radio telecommunication device or two-way radio must be turned on and adjusted in a manner that would alert the driver of an incoming communication request. See 625 ILCS 5/12-813, amended by P.A. 96-818 and P.A. 96-1066.

Bus drivers may still have cell phones although they are prohibited from using cell phones for anything, including personal use, while operating a bus except: (1) in an emergency situation to communicate with an emergency response operator; a hospital; a physician’s office or health clinic; an ambulance service; a fire department, fire district, or fire company; or a police department; (2) in the event of a “mechanical breakdown or other mechanical problem;” (3) to communicate with school authorities or their designees about bus operation or the welfare and safety of any passengers on the bus; or (4) when the bus is parked (625 ILCS 5/12-813.1(c), amended by P.A. 96-1066).

Bus/Vehicle Pre-Trip and Post-Trip Inspection
All school bus drivers, whether employed by the School District or private sector school bus company, shall:

  1. Test the cellular radio communication device or two-way radio and ensure that it is functioning properly before the bus is operated (625 ILCS 5/12-816, amended by P.A. 96-818 and P.A. 96-1066); and
  2. Perform a visual sweep for children or other passengers at the end of a route, work shift or workday by:
    1. Activating interior lights of the school bus to assist the driver in searching in and under each seat (625 ILCS 5/12-816(c), and
    2. Walking to the rear of the school bus/vehicle checking in and under each seat. 625 ILCS 5/12-816(b).
      If a mechanical post-trip inspection reminder system is installed, the driver shall comply with the requirements of that system. 625 ILCS 5/12-816(d).

Bus Driving Comments
Each school bus and multifunction school activity bus shall display a sign at the rear, with letters and numerals readily visible and readable, in the following form:

TO COMMENT ON MY DRIVING, CALL (815) 692-3484

Driving comments shall be accepted in the following manner:

  1. Calls to comment on school bus driving shall be directed to the Superintendent or designee.
  2. The Superintendent or designee shall conduct an internal investigation of the events that led to each complaint. Required for districts that own school buses by 625 ILCS 5/12-821(c)(1).
  3. The Superintendent or designee shall inform the commenting party of the results of any investigation and the action, if any, taken to remedy the situation. Required for districts that own school buses by 625 ILCS 5/12-821(c)(2).

POLICY APPROVED: December 15, 2011

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Article 437 – Co-Curricular Transportation & Efficiency Considerations

Operational Services
Co-Curricular Transportation & Efficiency Considerations

The Board of Education shall, when financially feasible1, provide transportation for school-sponsored co-curricular activities scheduled both in- and out-of-District. Efficiency shall be observed in routing and occupying vehicles (participants and equipment) without sacrificing safety.
General guidelines for assigning vehicles to co-curricular activities:

  1. The trip shall be determined essential by school administration.
  2. Proximity shall be considered when selecting a destination.
  3. The smallest vehicle shall be assigned. The District has, in its service, three (3) vehicle sizes for co-curricular purposes: Vans, white activity buses, and regular buses. These vehicles shall be assigned thusly:
    1. Vans, with capacity for 5 students and one (1) driver (Class D license required);
    2. White activity buses, with capacity for 6-14 students and one (1) driver (Class D license required); and
    3. Regular buses, with capacity for 15+ students and one (1) driver (Class CDL with “school bus” endorsement required)
  4. The fewest vehicles shall be assigned. Additional vehicles may be granted for a co-curricular trip, provided
    1. Vehicles are at or reasonably near posted capacity, with riders and (only essential) equipment;
    2. Segregation of participants traveling to the same destination is reasonably deemed not necessary (e.g. gender, age, JV team/varsity team, athletic team/cheer squad); and
    3. Each participant is reasonably required to remain for the duration of the event.
  5. LEGAL REF: 123 Illinois Administrative Code, 120.40 (a)(1)(Pupil transportation services provided to take participants to or from athletic contests, academic contests, extra-curricular and/or co-curricular activities are not eligible for reimbursement under the ISBE’s Pupil Transportation Reimbursement Claim program.)

    POLICY APPROVED: March 14, 2017

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    Article 440 – Food Services

    Operational Services
    Food Services

    Good nutrition shall be promoted in the District’s meal programs and in other food and beverages that are sold to students during the school day. The Superintendent shall manage a food service program that complies with this policy and is in alignment with School Board policy 650, School Wellness. The type and amounts of food and beverages sold to students before school and during the regular school day in any school that participates in the School Breakfast Program or the National School Lunch Program shall comply with any applicable mandates in the Illinois State Board of Education’s School Food Service rule and the federal rules implementing the National School Lunch Act and Child Nutrition Act.

    The food service program shall restrict the sale of foods of minimal nutritional value as defined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in the food service areas during meal periods. All revenue from the sale of any food or beverages sold in competition with the School Breakfast Program or National School Lunch Program to students in food service areas during the meal period shall accrue to the nonprofit school lunch program account.

    LEGAL REF.: B. Russell National School Lunch Act, 42 U.S.C. §1751 et seq.
    Child Nutrition Act of 1966, 42 U.S.C. §1771 et seq.
    42 U.S.C. §1779, as implemented by 7 C.F.R. §210.11.
    105 ILCS 125/.
    23 Ill.Admin.Code Part 305, School Food Service.

    POLICY APPROVED: November 17, 2005
    POLICY AMENDED: December 15, 2011

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    Article 440-AP – Administrative Procedure – Food Services

    Operational Services
    Administrative Procedure – Food Services

    This procedure applies only to schools that participate in the National School Lunch Act and Child Nutrition Act.

    Food and Beverages Sold to Students in Grades 8 or Below

    Food and beverages sold before school and during the regular school day must comply with both:

    1. ISBE’s School Food Service rule, 23 Ill.Admin.Code §305.15(a). However, this requirement does not apply to any food or beverages sold:
      1. As part of reimbursable meal or to food sold within the food service areas during meal periods, 23 Ill.Admin.Code §305.15(b), or
      2. To a student who presents written recommendation for the food or beverage signed by a physician licensed under the Medical Practice Act, 23 Ill.Admin.Code §305.15(c).
    2. The federal rules implementing the National School Lunch Act and Child Nutrition Act, 7 C.F.R. Part 210.

    If a school serves students in both grades 8 and below and students in grades 9 and above, the school must ensure that food and beverages sold to students in grades 8 and below meet the requirements of 23 Ill.Admin.Code §305.15(d).

    Competitive Foods
    “Competitive foods” are those foods or beverages sold in competition with the school’s food service. The sale of competitive foods is restricted as follows:

    1. Competitive foods that are identified in 7 C.F.R. §210.11 as having “minimal nutritional value” may not be sold in the food service area during meal periods.
    2. No confections, candy, or potato chips may be sold during meal periods in a school in which grade 5 or below operate, 23 Ill.Admin.Code §305.15(f).
    3. Competitive foods, other than those of minimal nutritional value, may be sold to students in the food service areas during meal periods only if the income they generate accrues to the nonprofit school lunch program account, 23 Ill.Admin.Code §305.15(e).

    LEGAL REF.: 42 U.S.C. §1779, 7 C.F.R. §210.11.
    23 Ill.Admin.Code Part 305, Food Program.

    POLICY APPROVED: December 15, 2011

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    Article 440.01 – Food Services Management

    Operational Services
    Food Services Management

    The principal, and food services coordinator, are jointly responsible for supervising the operation of the food service center in each school building. This responsibility includes interviewing and recommending the employment of cafeteria personnel. The head cook shall work through, and first seek the approval of, the principal and food services coordinator when preparing menus, purchasing all supplies, setting schedules of and assigning duties to cafeteria personnel, and keeping an inventory of supplies on hand.

    The food services coordinator shall maintain necessary records of accounting to ensure efficient business management. All bills for food shall be submitted to the unit office by the 8th of each month so the can be reported to the Board for approval and prepared for payment. The food services director shall prepare a financial report for each month’s regular Board of Education meeting. This report shall include revenues (local, state, and federal), expenditures, and inventory.

    POLICY READOPTED: February 21, 1994
    POLICY AMENDED: December 15, 2011

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    Article 441 – Free and Reduced-Price Food Services

    Operational Services
    Free and Reduced-Price Food Services

    Notice
    The Superintendent shall be responsible for implementing the District’s free and reduced-price food services policy and all applicable programs.

    Eligibility Criteria and Selection of Children
    A student’s eligibility for free and reduced-price food services shall be determined by the income eligibility guidelines, family-size income standards, set annually by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and distributed by the Illinois State Board of Education.

    Notification
    At the beginning of each school year, by letter, the District shall notify students and their parents/guardians of: (1) eligibility requirements for free and reduced-price food service; (2) the application process; (3) the name and telephone number of a contact person for the program; and (4) other information required by federal law. The Superintendent shall provide the same information to: (1) informational media, the local unemployment office, and any major area employers contemplating layoffs; and (2) the District’s website (if applicable), all school newsletters, or students’ registration materials. Parents/guardians enrolling a child in the District for the first time, any time during the school year, shall receive the eligibility information.

    Nondiscrimination Assurance
    The District shall avoid publicly identifying students receiving free or reduced-price meals and shall use methods for collecting meal payments that prevent identification of children receiving assistance.

    Appeal
    A family may appeal the District’s decision to deny an application for free and reduced-price food services or to terminate such services as outlined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 7 C.F.R. §245.7, Determining Eligibility for Free and Reduced-Price Meals and Free Milk in Schools. The Superintendent shall establish a hearing procedure for adverse eligibility decisions and provide by mail a copy of them to the family. The District may also use these procedures to challenge a child’s continued eligibility for free or reduced-price meals or milk.

    During an appeal, students previously receiving food service benefits shall not have their benefits terminated. Students who were denied benefits shall not receive benefits during the appeal.

    The Superintendent shall keep on file for a period of 3 years a record of any appeals made and the hearing record. The District shall also maintain accurate and complete records showing the data and method used to determine the number of eligible students served free and reduced-price food services. These records shall be maintained for 3 years.

    LEGAL REF.: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service, National School Lunch Program, 7 C.F.R. Part 210.
    U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service, Determining Eligibility for Free and Reduced-Price Meals and Free Milk in Schools, 7 C.F.R. Part 245.
    105 ILCS 125/0.01 et seq. and 126/1 et seq.
    23 Ill.Admin.Code §§1.520 and §305.10 et seq.

    POLICY APPROVED: November 17, 2005
    POLICY AMENDED:  December 15, 2011

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    Article 442 – Waiver of Student Fees

    Operational Services
    Waiver of Student Fees

    The Superintendent will recommend to the School Board a schedule of fees, if any, to be charged students for the use of textbooks, consumable materials, extracurricular activities, and other school student fees. Students must also pay for the loss of or damage to school books or other school-owned materials.

    Fees for textbooks, other instructional materials, and driver education are waived for students who meet the eligibility criteria for a fee waiver as described in this policy. In order that no student be denied educational services or academic credit due to the inability of parents/guardians to pay student fees, the Superintendent will recommend to the Board for adoption which additional fees, if any, the District will waive for students who meet the eligibility criteria for fee waiver. Students receiving a fee waiver are not exempt from charges for lost and damaged books, locks, materials, supplies, and equipment.

    Notification
    The Superintendent shall ensure that applications for fee waivers are widely available and distributed according to State law and ISBE rule and that provisions for assisting parents/guardians in completing the application are available.

    Eligibility Criteria
    A student shall be eligible for a fee waiver when the student currently lives in a household that meets the same income guidelines, with the same limits based on household size, that are used for the federal free meals program.

    The Superintendent or designee will give additional consideration when one or more of the following factors are present:

    1. Illness in the family;
    2. Unusual expenses such as fire, flood, storm damage, etc.;
    3. Seasonal unemployment;
    4. Emergency situations;
    5. When one or more of the parents/guardians are involved in a work stoppage.

    Verification
    The Superintendent or designee shall establish a process for determining a student’s eligibility for a waiver of fees in accordance with State law requirements. The Superintendent or designee may require family income verification at the time an individual applies for a fee waiver and anytime thereafter but not more often than once every 60 calendar days. The Superintendent or designee shall not use any information from this or any independent verification process to determine free or reduced-price meal eligibility.

    If a student receiving a fee waiver is found to be no longer eligible during the school year, the Superintendent or designee shall notify the student’s parent/guardian and charge the student a prorated amount based upon the number of school days remaining in the school year.

    Determination and Appeal
    Within 30 calendar days after the receipt of a waiver request, the Superintendent or designee shall mail a notice to the parent/guardian whenever a waiver request is denied. The denial notice shall include: (1) the reason for the denial, (2) the process and timelines for making an appeal, and (3) a statement that the parent/guardian may reapply for a waiver any time during the school year if circumstances change. If the denial is appealed, the District shall follow the procedures for the resolution of appeals as provided in the Illinois State Board of Education rule on waiver of fees.

    LEGAL REF.: 105 ILCS 5/10-20.13 and 5/10-22.25.
    23 Ill.Admin.Code §1.245 (unenforceable).

    POLICY APPROVED: November 17, 2005
    POLICY AMENDED:  December 15, 2011

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    Article 445-E – Exhibit – Resolution to Increase Driver Education Fees

    Operational Services
    Exhibit – Resolution to Increase Driver Education Fees

    WHEREAS, Section 27-24.2 of the School Code provides that a School District may charge a reasonable fee, not to exceed $50, to students who participate in a driver education course;
    WHEREAS, the Illinois General Assembly amended that same section of the School Code in P.A. 97-145 to allow a school board to increase the fee to an amount not to exceed $250 by school board resolution following a public hearing on the increase, provided that the fee is waived for students who are unable to pay for the course;
    WHEREAS, the School Board held a public hearing to increase the driver education course fee to an amount not to exceed $250 on ________(date)________;
    WHEREAS, the Board already waives the driver education course fees for students who are unable to pay (Board Policy Article 442, Waiver of Student Fees);
    WHEREAS, the Administration provided evidence at the hearing that a fee of $250 for each student taking the driver education course when added to the reimbursement from the State for driver education will not exceed the total cost of the driver education program in any year;
    THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the School Board hereby increases the driver education fee to an amount not to exceed $250.00, effective on _______(date)__________, and waives the increased fee for any student who is unable to pay for the course according to the provisions in Board Policy Article 442, Waiver of Student Fees.
    Attested by:______________________________________
    Board President
    Attested by:______________________________________
    Board Secretary

    POLICY APPROVED: December 15, 2011

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    Article 450 – Environmental Quality of Buildings and Grounds

    Operational Services
    Environmental Quality of Buildings and Grounds

    The Superintendent shall take all reasonable measures to protect the safety of District personnel, students, and visitors on District premises from risks associated with hazardous materials, including pesticides, and infectious materials.

    The Superintendent shall take all reasonable measures to protect: (1) the safety of District personnel, students, and visitors on District premises from risks associated with hazardous materials and (2) the environmental quality of the District’s buildings and grounds. Before pesticides are used on District premises, the Superintendent or designee shall notify employees and parents/guardians of students as required by the Structural Pest Control Act, 225 ILCS 235/, and the Lawn Care Products Application and Notice Act, 415 ILCS 65/.

    LEGAL REF.: 29 C.F.R. Part 1910.1030, as adopted by the Illinois Department of Labor, 56 Ill.Admin.Code §350.300(c).
    20 ILCS 3130/, Green Buildings Act.
    105 ILCS 5/10-20.17a; 5/10-20.48; 135/; and 140/, Green Cleaning School Act.
    225 ILCS 235/, Structural Pest Control Act.
    415 ILCS 65/, Lawn Care Products Application and Notice Act.
    820 ILCS 255/, Toxic Substances Disclosure to Employees Act.
    23 Ill.Admin.Code §1.330, Hazardous Materials Training.
    56 Ill.Admin.Code Part 205, Toxic Substances Disclosure To Employees.

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    Article 450-AP – Administrative Procedure – Environmental Quality of Buildings and Grounds

    Operational Services
    Administrative Procedure – Environmental Quality of Buildings and Grounds

    Hazardous and/or Infectious Materials
    A hazardous and/or infectious materials is any substance, or mixture of substances, that constitutes a fire, explosive, reactive, or health hazard. The following are examples of such materials:

    • Any item contained in the definition of “toxic substance” in the Toxic Substances Disclosure to Employees Act (820 ILCS 255/);
    • An item or surface that has the presence of, or may reasonably be anticipated to have the presence of, blood or other bodily fluids;
    • Non-building related asbestos materials;
    • Lead and lead compounds (included in school supplies, i.e., art supplies, ceramic glazes);
    • Compressed gases (natural gas); and explosive (hydrogen), poisonous (chlorine), or toxic gases (exhaust gases, such as, carbon monoxide);
    • Solvents (gasoline, turpentine, mineral spirits, alcohol, carbon tetrachloride);
    • Liquids, compounds, solids or other hazardous chemicals that might be toxic, poisonous, or cause serious bodily injury;
    • Materials required to be labeled by the Department of Agriculture or the EPA (pesticides, algaecide, rodenticide, bactericides); and
    • Regulated underground storage tank hazardous materials (including diesel fuel, regular and unleaded gasoline, oil (both new and used), and propylene glycol).

    The Buildings and Grounds Supervisor is responsible for compliance with State and federal law, including the Toxic Substances Disclosure to Employees Act (820 ILCS 255/), and shall:

    1. Maintains a perpetual inventory of hazardous materials.
    2. Makes available inventory lists to the appropriate police, fire, and emergency service agencies.
    3. Compiles and update, when necessary, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for each toxic substance used, produced, or stored to which an employee may be exposed, and distribute them as appropriate.
    4. Submit to the Director of the Illinois Department of Labor, as required, an alphabetized list of substances, compounds, or mixtures for which the District has acquired a MSDS.
    5. Makes available MSDS to all persons requesting the information.
    6. Stores hazardous or toxic materials in compliance with local, State, and federal law. Storage containers must be labeled with the chemical name and appropriate warning hazards and stored in a location that limits the risk presented by the materials. Containers must be stored in a limited-access area.
    7. Transports hazardous materials in a manner that poses the least possible risk to persons and the environment and that is in compliance with local, State, and federal law.
    8. Classify hazardous materials as current inventory, waste, excess, or surplus; and dispose of hazardous materials in accordance with local, State, and federal law.
    9. Post information regarding employee rights under the Act on employee bulletin boards throughout the District.
    10. Provide an education and in-service training program with respect to all toxic substances to which employees are routinely exposed in the course of employment.

    Pesticide Application on School Grounds

    The Buildings and Grounds Supervisor is responsible for compliance with the Lawn Care Products Application and Notice Act (415 ILCS 65/3, amended by P.A. 96-424) and shall:

    1. Provide an annual schedule of pesticide application to the supervisor of each District building.
    2. In coordination with the supervisor of each District building (including each Building Principal), notify employees and students and their parents/guardians in each building. The notification must:
      1. Be provided at least 4 business days before a pesticide application on school grounds.
      2. Be written or by telephone. If written, the notice may be included in newsletters, calendars, or other correspondence currently being published.
      3. Identify the intended date of the application.
      4. Provide the name and telephone contact number for the Buildings and Grounds Supervisor or other school personnel responsible for the pesticide program.

    An exception to this notification is permitted if there is an imminent threat to health or property, in which case the Lawn Care Products Application and Notice Act shall control. If such a situation arises, the Building and Grounds Supervisor must sign a statement describing the circumstances that gave rise to the health threat and ensure that written or telephonic notice is provided as soon as practicable.

    Pesticide Application in School Buildings and Structures

    The Buildings and Grounds Supervisor is responsible for compliance with the requirements in the Structural Pest Control Act (225 ILCS 235/, reenacted by P.A. 96-473) and shall:

      1. Provide an annual schedule of pesticide application to the supervisor of each District building.
      2. In coordination with the supervisor of each District building (including each Building Principal):
        1. Maintain a registry of all employees and parents/guardians of students.
        2. Notify those employees and parents/guardians before pesticides are applied in or on each building. The notification must:
          1. Be provided at least 2 business days before a pesticide application in or on school buildings.
          2. Be written. The notice may be included in newsletters, bulletins, calendars, or other correspondence currently being published.
          3. Identify the intended date of the application.
          4. Provide the name and telephone contact number for the Buildings and Grounds Supervisor or other school personnel responsible for the pesticide program.
          5. An exception to this notification is permitted if there is an imminent threat to health or property, in which case the Structural Pest Control Act shall control. If such a situation arises, the Building and Grounds Supervisor must sign a statement describing the circumstances that gave rise to the health threat and ensure that written notice is provided as soon as practicable.

    The Buildings and Grounds Supervisor is responsible for the District’s integrated pest management program and the District’s compliance with the Structural Pest Control Act (225 ILCS 235/, reenacted by P.A. 96-473).

    Applicable if the Superintendent determines that an integrated pest management program is economically feasible:

    The Buildings and Grounds Supervisor or designee shall: (1) develop and implement a program incorporating the Department of Public Health guidelines; (2) notify the Department, on forms provided by the Department, that a program is being implemented; (3) repeat the notification every 5 years after the initial notification; and (4) keep copies of all notifications and all written integrated pest management program plans.

    Applicable if the Superintendent determines that adopting an integrated pest management program is not economically feasible because such adoption would result in an increase in pest control costs:

    The Buildings and Grounds Supervisor or designee shall: (1) notify the Department, on forms provided by the Department, that the development and implementation of an integrated pest management program is not economically feasible; (2) include in the notification the projected pest control costs for the term of the pest control program and projected costs for implementing a program for that same time period; (3) repeat this notification every 5 years after the initial notification until a program is developed and implemented; and (4) attend a training course, approved by the Department, on integrated pest management and repeat attendance every 5 years thereafter until a program is developed and implemented in the District’s schools.

    The Buildings and Grounds Supervisor or designee shall maintain copies of all notifications that are required by the Structural Pest Control Act and provide the Building Principal(s) or designee(s) sufficient information to allow him/her/them to inform all parents/guardians and school employees at least once each school year that the District has met its notification requirements.

    Training and Necessary Equipment

    Each Building Principal and non-certificated staff supervisor shall ensure that all staff members under his or her supervision receives training on the safe handling and use of hazardous materials as required by 105 ILCS 5/10-20.17a. Emergency response and evacuation plans must be a part of the training.

    Before an employee is given an assignment where contact with blood or bodily fluids or other hazardous material is likely, the employee must be provided the necessary training, including training in the universal precautions and other infection control measures to prevent the transmission of communicable diseases and/or to reduce potential health hazards as required by 23 Ill.Admin.Code §1.330. The appropriate supervisor shall maintain an attendance record of an employee’s participation in the training.

    Substitute Non-Hazardous Materials

    District staff shall comply with State law governing toxic art supplies in schools, 105 ILCS 135/. This includes substituting non-hazardous materials for hazardous substances whenever possible and minimize the quantity of hazardous substances stored in school facilities. No art or craft material containing a toxic substance shall be ordered or purchased for use through grade 6; material containing toxic substances may be used in grades 7 through 12 only if properly labeled according to State law.

    Infectious Materials

    The Buildings and Grounds Supervisor shall prepare and distribute to all employees an Occupational Exposure Control Plan to eliminate or minimize occupational exposure to potentially infectious materials. The Plan shall comply with the Bloodborne Pathogens Standards adopted by State and federal regulatory agencies and an updated copy given to the Superintendent annually. The Plan shall address the following issues:

        1. Exposure determination. Positions that do not subject the employee to occupational exposure are exempt from the Plan and the Standards generally.
        2. Implementation schedule specifying how and when risks are to be reduced. The Standards are very specific on risks reduction, e.g., Universal Precautions must be followed; engineering and work practice controls are specified (hand washing, restricted food areas); personal protection equipment must be provided; housekeeping requirements are specified (regulated waste disposal and laundry); vaccination requirements (all employees who have occupational exposure must be offered, at employer expense, the hepatitis B vaccine and vaccination series); communication of hazards to employees through labeling and training; and record-keeping.
        3. Process for ensuring that all medical evaluations and procedures, including the hepatitis B vaccine and vaccination series and post-exposure evaluation and follow-up, are available as required by law.
        4. Procedures for evaluating an exposure incident.

    Emergency Response Plan

    The building principal shall ensure that proper procedures for the cleanup of potentially hazardous material spills include the following:

        1. A building custodian is responsible for the actual cleanup,
        2. Personal protective equipment, chemical neutralization kits, and absorbent material are available in each building at all times, and
        3. Spill residue is placed in containers designated for such purpose and disposed of in compliance with local, State, and federal law.

    Evacuation

    The Building Principal shall ensure compliance with the School Safety Drill Act, 105 ILCS 128/. This includes, among other things, ensuring that evacuation rules are posted in each room and discussed with each class using the room during the first days of the school year. The evacuation rules indicate the primary and alternate exits and the evacuation area to which students should proceed upon leaving the building.

    The Building Principal shall conduct evacuation drills according to School Board Policy.

    LEGAL REF:   29 C.F.R. Part 1910.1030, adopted by the Ill. Department of Labor, 56 Ill.Admin.Code §350.380.                                                                                       105 ILCS 5/10-20.17a, Hazardous Materials Training; 5/10-20.46, Compliance with Chemical Safety Acts; 135/, Toxic Art Supplies in School Act; and 140/, Green Cleaning School Act.
    225 ILCS 235/, Structural Pest Control Act.
    415 ILCS 65/3, Lawn Care Products Application and Notice Act.
    820 ILCS 255/1 et. seq., Toxic Substances Disclosure to Employees Act.
    23 Ill.Admin.Code §1.330, “Hazardous Materials Training”.
    56 Ill.Admin.Code Part 205, Toxic Substances Disclosure to Employees.

    POLICY APPROVED: November 17, 2005
    POLICY AMENDED:  December 15, 2011

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    Article 450.01 – Custodial Services

    Operational Services
    Custodial Services

    Each principal is responsible to the Superintendent for the cleanliness and sanitation of the building(s) under his/her supervision. The principal shall determine work schedules and perform evaluations of custodial staff to ensure that cleanliness and sanitations standards are met. Custodial employees shall be approved by the Board of Education upon the recommendation of the Superintendent. The Superintendent and principals, with the input of the chief of maintenance, shall establish a cleaning program in facilities that also includes summer cleaning. The chief of maintenance shall supervise custodial employees during summer work sessions and shall be responsible for assigning substitute custodians year round.

    POLICY ADOPTED: June 18, 2001
    POLICY AMENDED: August 18, 2003
    POLICY AMENDED: December 15, 2011

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    Article 450.02 – Facility Management and Building Programs

    Operational Services
    Facility Management and Building Programs

    The Superintendent shall manage the District’s facilities and grounds as well as facility construction and building programs in accordance with the law, the standards set forth in this policy, and other applicable School Board policies. The Superintendent or designee shall facilitate: (1) inspections of schools by the Regional Superintendent and State Fire Marshal or designee, and (2) review of plans and specifications for future construction or alterations of a school if requested by the relevant municipality, county (if applicable), or fire protection district.

    Standards for Managing Buildings and Grounds
    All District buildings and grounds shall be adequately maintained in order to provide an appropriate, safe, and energy efficient physical environment for learning and teaching. The Superintendent or designee shall provide the Board with periodic reports on maintenance data and projected maintenance needs that include cost analysis. Prior Board approval is needed for all renovations or permanent alterations to buildings or grounds when the total cost will exceed $12,500, including the cost equivalent of staff time. This policy is not intended to discourage efforts to improve the appearance of buildings or grounds that are consistent with the designated use of those buildings and grounds, or the Superintendent’s executive action in the event of an emergency. The Superintendent shall, at the next meeting of the Board, inform the Board regarding the nature of the emergency and the steps taken to correct it.

    Standards for Green Cleaning
    For each District school with 50 or more students, the Superintendent or designee shall establish and supervise a green cleaning program that complies with the guidelines established by the Illinois Green Government Coordinating Council.

    Standards for Facility Construction and Building Programs
    As appropriate, the Board will authorize a comprehensive study to determine the need for facility construction and expansion. On an annual basis, the Superintendent or designee shall provide the Board with projected facility needs, enrollment trends, and other data impacting facility use. Board approval is needed for all new facility construction and expansion.

    When making decisions pertaining to design and construction of school facilities, the Board will confer with members of the staff and community, the Illinois State Board of Education, and educational and architectural consultants, as it deems appropriate. The Board’s facility goals are to:

    1. Integrate facilities planning with other aspects of planning and goal-setting.
    2. Base educational specifications for school buildings on identifiable student needs.
    3. Design buildings for sufficient flexibility to permit new or modified programs.
    4. Design buildings for maximum potential for community use.
    5. Meet or exceed all safety requirements.
    6. Meet requirements on the accessibility of school facilities to disabled persons as specified in State and federal law.
    7. Provide for low maintenance costs, energy efficiency, and minimal environmental impact.

    Naming Buildings and Facilities
    Recognizing that the name for a school building, facility, or ground or field reflects on its public image, the Board’s primary consideration will be to select a name that enhances the credibility and stature of the school or facility. Any request to name or rename an existing facility should be submitted to the Board. When a facility is to be named or renamed, the Board President will appoint a special committee to consider nominations and make a recommendation, along with supporting rationale, to the Board. The Board will make the final selection. The Superintendent or designee may name a room or designate some area on a school’s property in honor of an individual or group that has performed outstanding service to the school without using the process in this policy.

    LEGAL REF.: 42 U.S.C. §12101 et seq.
    20 ILCS 3130/, Green Buildings Act.
    105 ILCS 5/10-20.49, 5/10-22.36, 5/17-2.11, 140/, and 230/.
    410 ILCS 25/, Environmental Barriers Act.
    820 ILCS 130/, Prevailing Wage Act.
    23 Ill.Admin.Code Part 151, School Construction Program; Part 180, Health/Life Safety Code for Public Schools; and Part 2800, Green Cleaning for Elementary and Secondary Schools.
    71 Ill.Admin.Code Part 400, Ill. Accessibility Code.

    POLICY APPROVED: February 17, 1986
    POLICY AMENDED:  August 18, 2003
    POLICY AMENDED:  December 15, 2011

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    Article 465 – Safety

    Operational Services
    Safety

    Safety Program

    All District operations, including the education program, shall be conducted in a manner that will promote the safety of everyone on District property or at a District event.

    The Superintendent or designee shall develop and implement a comprehensive safety and crisis plan incorporating both avoidance and management guidelines. The comprehensive safety and crisis plan shall specifically include provisions for: injury prevention; bomb threats, weapons, and explosives on campus; school safety drill program; tornado protection; instruction in safe bus riding practices; emergency aid; post-crisis management; and, responding to medical emergencies at an indoor and outdoor physical fitness facility. During each academic year, each school building that houses school children must conduct a minimum of:

    1. Three school evacuation drills,
    2. One bus evacuation drill, and
    3. One severe weather and shelter-in-place drill.

    The Superintendent or appropriate designee must conduct a law enforcement drill in one of the District’s school buildings during the academic year. Any appropriate local law enforcement agency may conduct and participate in this law enforcement drill. The law enforcement drill must be conducted according to the District’s comprehensive safety and crisis plan and it may be conducted on days and times that students are not present in the building.

    In the event of an emergency that threatens the safety of any person or property, students and staff are encouraged to use any available cellular telephone.

    Convicted Child Sex Offender and Notification Laws
    State law prohibits a child sex offender from being present on school property or loitering within 500 feet of school property when persons under the age of 18 are present, unless the offender meets either of the following two exceptions:

    1. The offender is a parent/guardian of a student attending the school and has notified the Building Principal of his or her presence at the school for the purpose of: (i) attending a conference with school personnel to discuss the progress of his or her child academically or socially, (ii) participating in child review conferences in which evaluation and placement decisions may be made with respect to his or her child regarding special education services, or (iii) attending conferences to discuss other student issues concerning his or her child such as retention and promotion; or
    2. The offender received permission to be present from the School Board, Superintendent, or Superintendent’s designee. If permission is granted, the Superintendent or Board President shall provide the details of the offender’s upcoming visit to the Building Principal.

    In all cases, the Superintendent, or designee who is a certified employee, shall supervise a child sex offender whenever the offender is in a child’s vicinity.

    If a student is a sex offender, the Superintendent or designee shall develop guidelines for managing his or her presence in school.

    The Superintendent shall develop procedures for the distribution and use of information from law enforcement officials under the Sex Offender Community Notification Law and the Child Murderer and Violent Offender Against Youth Community Notification Law. The Superintendent or designee shall serve as the District contact person for purposes of these laws. The Superintendent and Building Principal shall manage a process for schools to notify the parents/guardians during school registration that information about sex offenders is available to the public as provided in the Sex Offender Community Notification Law. This notification must occur during school registration and at other times as the Superintendent or Building Principal determines advisable.

    All contracts with the School District that may involve an employee or agent of the contractor having any contact, direct or indirect, with a student, shall contain the following:

    The contractor shall not send to any school building or school property any employee or agent who would be prohibited from being employed by the District due to a conviction of a crime listed in 105 ILCS 5/10-21.9, or who is listed in the Statewide Sex Offender Registry or the Statewide Violent Offender Against Youth Database. The contractor shall obtain a fingerprint-based criminal history records check before sending any employee or agent to any school building or school property. Additionally, at least quarterly, the contractor shall check if an employee or agent is listed on the Statewide Sex Offender Registry or the Statewide Violent Offender Against Youth Database.

    Unsafe School Choice Option
    The unsafe school choice option allows students to transfer to another District school or to a public charter school within the District. The unsafe school choice option is available to:

    1. All students attending a persistently dangerous school, as defined by State law and identified by the Illinois State Board of Education.
    2. Any student who is a victim of a violent criminal offense, as defined by 725 ILCS 120/3, that occurred on school grounds during regular school hours or during a school-sponsored event.

    The Superintendent or designee shall develop procedures to implement the unsafe school choice option.

    Student Insurance
    The Board shall annually designate a company to offer student accident insurance coverage. The Board does not endorse the plan nor recommend that parents/guardians secure the coverage, and any contract is between the parents/guardians and the company. Students participating in athletics, cheerleading, or pompons must have school accident insurance unless the parents/guardians state in writing that the student is covered under a family health insurance plan.

    Emergency Closing
    The Superintendent is authorized to close the schools in the event of hazardous weather or other emergencies that threaten the safety of students, staff members, or school property.

    LEGAL REF.:  105 ILCS 5/10-20.28, 5/10-21.3a, 5/10-21.9, and 128/.
    210 ILCS 74/.
    625 ILCS 5/12-813.1.
    720 ILCS 5/11-9.3.
    730 ILCS 152/101 et seq.

    APPROVED: November 17, 2005
    AMENDED:  January 19, 2012

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    Article 465-AP1 – Administrative Procedure – Comprehensive Safety and Crisis Program

    Operational Services
    Administrative Procedure – Comprehensive Safety and Crisis Program
    1. Safety Team
    2. Personal Injury Prevention
    3. Site Based Safety Plan
    4. School Safety Drill Program
    5. Bomb Threat Plan
    6. Fire Emergency Procedures
    7. Natural Disasters (Tornadoes, Thunderstorms, Severe Winds, Earthquakes)
    8. Weapons and Explosives on Campus
    9. Emergency Aid
    10. Managing a Crisis After the Earliest Stages Are Over
    11. Managing Communications About a Crisis
    12. Required Notices
      1. Safety Team
        The Superintendent appoints:

        1. An administrator to be the District’s Safety Program Coordinator, and
        2. Representatives of all support and professional staff to be on the Superintendent’s Safety Team.

        The Safety Program Coordinator manages the District’s safety and crisis efforts. The Safety Team: (1) advises and assists the Superintendent on safety and crisis issues, (2) monitors the District’s safety control measures, (3) reviews and updates safety efforts based on accident or inspection reports, reports of unsafe conditions or practices, and complaints and suggestions, and (4) prepares the staff for a crisis through communication and training.

        The Safety Program Coordinator chairs the Safety Team meetings. The meetings are held as determined by the Safety Program Coordinator. The following matters are suggested agenda items:
        Previous action items
        Review of accidents since previous meeting
        Prevention recommendations
        Recommendations from anonymous employees
        Staff member suggestions
        Recommended safety program revisions
        Recommendations from accident investigation reports
        Safety training recommendations
        Committee members input

      2. Personal Injury Prevention
        The Safety Program Coordinator and Safety Team shall supervise an on-going program for identifying and evaluating unreasonable risks, that includes monitoring whether:

        1. Students are appropriately supervised.
        2. Facilities and equipment that would pose an unreasonable risk to students (such as laboratory and climbing equipment) are kept locked.
        3. Staff members are trained to recognize dangerous conditions.
        4. Proper student behavior is maintained.
        5. Substitute instructors are competent to teach an activity.
        6. Teachers and coaches evaluate each student’s capacity to do a specific activity without exposing the student to an unreasonable risk of injury.
        7. Activities are appropriately demonstrated. Instructions are appropriate and clear and safety rules are emphasized. Proper teaching progressions are followed. Teachers and coaches reasonably match student competitors.
        8. Students are warned of the specific dangers of incorrectly performing an activity and the warning is documented.
        9. Appropriate behavior toward strangers is explained.
        10. Facilities and equipment are properly maintained, well lit, and periodically inspected. Aisles, walkways, and stairs are kept clear and free of obstacles. Floors are kept dry. Unused or outdated equipment is removed. Repairs, routine maintenance, and inspections are documented.
        11. Staff members are encouraged to report equipment or facilities that are inappropriate, in need of repair, or defective. As an example, equipment that fits improperly or fails to properly protect students is inappropriate.
        12. Notices from staff members that equipment or facilities are inappropriate, in need of repair, or defective are properly investigated.
        13. Warning signs or labels are properly displayed and safety rules are posted.
        14. Protective eye devices are provided and worn by all students, teachers, and visitors when participating in or observing any activity that may be hazardous to unprotected eyes (105 ILCS 115/1, 23 Ill.Admin.Code §1.420(s).
      3. Site Based Safety Plan
        Under the direction of the Safety Program Coordinator, each Building Principal or designee shall annually gather the following documents for a site based safety plan. If a document cannot be found or needs revision in order to comply with the District’s Comprehensive Safety Plan, the Building Principal or designee shall confer with the Safety Program Coordinator to create or revise the document. The Principal or designee shall make the plan available in the building’s main office.Each plan shall include the following:

        1. Building evacuation plans. The Principal or designee shall: (1) keep a comprehensive evacuation map – describing main and alternate routes – in the main office, (2) post signs containing main and alternative evacuation routes for each occupied area in a conspicuous place, preferably near the exit, (3) prepare evacuation plans for outdoor areas (playgrounds and stadiums), and (4) keep all staff informed of the evacuation plans.
        2. Safety drills. The Principal shall schedule and execute evacuation drills as per the School Safety Drill Act, 105 ILCS 128/, School Board Policy Article 465, Safety, and this procedure.
        3. Building information packet. This packet will include facts on the number and names of staff and students, as well as a building map. The Principal or designee shall give a copy of the map to local law enforcement, the fire department, and emergency medical services.
        4. Tornado response plan, including a map showing tornado wall locations (105 ILCS 128/25).
        5. A map giving the location of first aid kits, AEDs, and fire extinguishers.
        6. The safety equipment’s maintenance schedule and persons responsible for performing.
        7. An emergency early dismissal plan.
        8. A map or plan describing the areas to be used in the event of a crisis for triage, emergency helicopter landing, media center, non-victim students, and parents.
        9. A plan for receiving tips, e.g., a hot line for students to call with anonymous tips.
        10. A plan for student supervision.
        11. A safety patrol plan (105 ILCS 5/10-22.28).
        12. Bicycle use rules.
        13. Roadway and parking rules.
        14. Procedures on student illness and injuries (23 Ill.Admin.Code §530).
        15. A plan for giving students instructions on safe school bus riding practices, including the operation and use of the emergency door and windows (as a means of escape), seat belts, and fire extinguisher (105 ILCS 5/10-20.14).
        16. Safety-related administrative procedures and forms.
      4. School Safety Drill Program
        The School Safety Drill Act (105 ILCS 128/) and any implementing State administrative rules contain the requirements for the District’s safety drills and shall supersede this procedure in the event of a conflict.During each academic year, each school building that houses school children must conduct a minimum of:

        1. Three school evacuation drills,
        2. One bus evacuation drill, and
        3. One severe weather and shelter-in-place drill.

        When contacted by the appropriate local law enforcement agency with a request to conduct and participate in a law enforcement drill, the Superintendent or appropriate designee must conduct a law enforcement drill during the academic year. The law enforcement drill must be conducted according to the District’s comprehensive safety and crisis plan and it may be conducted on days and times that students are not present in the building but must occur.

        The Building Principal shall keep the Superintendent or designee informed as to the status of the drills. Each of these drills is described below:

        School evacuation drills – These drills prepare students and personnel for situations that occur when conditions outside of a school building are safer than inside a school building. Evacuation may be necessary, depending on the circumstances, in the event of fire, presence of suspicious items, incidents involving hazardous materials, and bomb threats.

        The appropriate local fire department or district participates in one school evacuation drill, unless waived as provided below. A date is selected according to the following timeline:

        • No later than September 1 of each year, each local fire department or fire district must contact the Building Principal in order to make arrangements.
        • No later than September 14 of each year, the Building Principal or designee and the local fire department or fire district may agree to waive the provisions concerning participation by the local fire department or district in a school evacuation drill.
        • No later than September 15 of each year, each Building Principal or designee must contact the responding local fire official and propose to the local fire official 4 dates within the month of October, during at least 2 different weeks of October, on which to hold the drill. The fire official may choose any of the 4 available dates, and if he or she does so, the drill occurs on that date.
        • Alternatively, the Building Principal or designee and the local fire official may, by mutual agreement, set any other date for the drill, including a date outside of the month of October.
        • If the fire official does not select one of the 4 offered dates in October or set another date by mutual agreement, the school does not need to include the local fire service in one of its mandatory school evacuation drills.

        After a drill in which the local fire service participated, the Building Principal should request certification from the local fire service that the school evacuation drill was conducted. Additional school evacuation drills for fire incidents may involve the participation of the appropriate local fire department or district. Schools may conduct additional school evacuation drills to account for other evacuation incidents, including without limitation suspicious items or bomb threats.

        Bus evacuation drill – This drill prepares students and school personnel for situations that occur when conditions outside of the bus are safer than inside the bus. Evacuation may be necessary, depending on the circumstances, in the event of a fire, presence of suspicious items, and incidents involving hazardous materials.

        This drill shall be accounted for in the curriculum in all public schools and in all other educational institutions in this State that are supported or maintained, in whole or in part, by public funds and that provide instruction in any of the grades kindergarten through 12. This curriculum shall also include instruction in safe bus riding practices for all students. Schools may conduct additional bus evacuation drills.

        Severe weather and shelter-in-place drill This drill prepares students for situations involving severe weather emergencies or the release of external gas or chemicals. Severe weather and shelter-in-place incidents must address and prepare students and school personnel for possible tornado incidents. Severe weather and shelter-in-place incidents shall be based on the needs and environment of particular communities, including severe weather (such as, tornadoes, shear winds, lightning, and earthquakes), incidents involving hazardous materials, and incidents involving weapons of mass destruction.

        When contacted by the appropriate local law enforcement agency with a request to conduct and participate in a law enforcement drill, the Superintendent or appropriate designee must conduct a law enforcement drill during the academic year.

        Law enforcement drill – This drill prepares students and school personnel for situations calling for the involvement of law enforcement when conditions inside a school building are safer than outside of a school building and it is necessary to protect building occupants from potential dangers in a school building. Law enforcement drills may involve situations that call for the reverse-evacuation or the lock-down of a school building. Incidents requiring a lock-down may include shooting incidents, bomb threats, suspicious persons, and incidents involving hazardous materials. All such drills must be conducted according to this administrative procedure, 465-AP1, Comprehensive Safety and Crisis Program, with the participation of the appropriate law enforcement agency. A law enforcement drill may be conducted on days and times when students are not present in the school building.

        After a drill in which the local law enforcement participated, the Building Principal should request a certification from the local law enforcement that the law enforcement drill was conducted.

        Annual Review. The School Board or its designee will annually review each school building’s emergency and crisis response plans, protocols, and procedures, as well as each building’s compliance with the school safety drill program.

      5. Bomb Threat Plan
        Any bomb threat is treated as a danger to all persons in a school building. Staff members shall follow these procedures when a bomb threat is made:

        1. The secretary or any person taking the telephone call will attempt to gain as much information as possible from the caller, i.e., the bomb’s location, type, when it will explode, and the caller’s name, sex, age, and voice tone.
        2. The main office will immediately call 911.
        3. The main office will immediately advise the Building Principal or designee of the situation. The Building Principal or designee shall announce a “Code Yellow” over the public address system to notify the staff a bomb threat was received. All two-way radios should be immediately shut off.
        4. The Building Principal will sound the fire alarm and evacuate the building(s).
        5. Staff members should note any “strange” boxes or packages. Do not touch anything suspicious. Report any such item to law enforcement after you have left the building.
        6. The Building Principal or designee shall notify the Superintendent’s office; the Superintendent’s office shall notify the Safety Program Coordinator.
        7. The Building Principal shall check to ensure everyone has left the building(s).
        8. Staff members shall account for everyone by making a roll call check. Names of missing students or staff members will be relayed to the Building Principal.
        9. Staff members shall escort the students to a predetermined waiting area that is a safe distance from the school and wait for further instructions.
        10. The Building Principal shall assist the police, fire, and public safety officials as needed.
        11. After a bomb search is completed, the Building Principal, Safety Program Coordinator, Superintendent, and local law enforcement will determine if the building should be re-entered.
        12. If the school cannot be re-entered, the students will be moved to the closest available facility that can safely house them.
        13. When a bomb threat is made before lunch, the Building Principal or designee shall coordinate with the food service department to arrange for an alternative lunch plan.
        14. If the decision is made to move students to an alternate school, the Building Principal or designee shall so notify the transportation department. Buses will be used if the school is beyond walking distance or if there is inclement weather.
        15. The transportation department will make arrangements to have the evacuated students picked up at the regular release time, at the alternate site, by the normal route school buses.
        16. When a bomb threat is made during inclement weather, the Building Principal or designee shall notify the transportation department to supply buses for temporary shelters. This should not delay the school’s evacuation.
        17. No one shall re-enter the building unless the “All Clear” is sounded by the Building Principal. No electronic devices shall be used to recall students into the building.
      6. Fire Emergency Procedures
        The following emergency actions shall be taken by the appropriate staff member:

        1. Pull the fire alarm immediately if you have any reason to suspect a fire may be in the building. If possible, notify the main office, giving as many details as possible.
        2. The main office will immediately call 911.
        3. The main office will immediately advise the Building Principal or designee of the situation.
        4. The Building Principal will sound the fire alarm and evacuate the building(s).
        5. The Building Principal or designee shall notify the Superintendent’s office; the Superintendent’s office shall notify the Safety Program Coordinator.
        6. Fire extinguishers should be used only after notifying the Fire Department and only if feasible. Fire extinguishers are intended for small fires only. In addition, the user should make sure the fire extinguisher is of the proper type for the fire before using it.
        7. When the fire alarm is heard:
          1. Teachers and supervisors shall be sure that all windows and doors are closed and lights are turned off in their rooms. They should pick-up their class register and grade book and then lead students out of the building according to the evacuation route.
          2. Teachers and supervisors shall immediately check the class register to be sure all students are present. If a student is absent who was present before the evacuation, notify the Principal or fire official immediately.
      7. Natural Disasters (Tornadoes, Thunderstorms, Severe Winds, Earthquakes)
        A natural disaster includes severe weather situations, tornadoes, hazardous material accidents, floods, and earthquakes. The following emergency procedures should be taken:

        1. The Building Principal or main office staff will alert staff – the signal is “Tornado Tone.”
        2. Teachers shall step into the halls to immediately clear them by directing students to the classroom.
        3. While in the room, all teachers and students are to maintain sheltered positions.
        4. Call 911 if emergency responders are needed.
        5. Render first aid, if necessary.
        6. The Building Principal or designee will direct designated “couriers” to each classroom notifying the teacher/staff of the situation.
        7. Unless the situation requires evacuation, all doors will remain locked and personnel and students will remain stationary until the “All Clear” is sounded by the Building Principal.
      8. Weapons and Explosives on Campus
        Any report of a person armed with a weapon or explosive on campus is a “Code Red,” i.e., all doors are locked in offices, classrooms, and halls. The following emergency actions shall be taken by the appropriate staff member:

        1. Notify the main office immediately if you have any reason to believe that a weapon or explosive is on school grounds. Give the main office as many details as possible (where, who is involved, type of weapon, and if anyone is injured or is currently being threatened or being held hostage).
        2. The main office will immediately call 911.
        3. The main office will immediately advise the Building Principal or designee of the situation. The Building Principal or designee shall announce a “Code Red” over the public address system to notify staff members to lock all doors.
        4. If possible, move students safely away from the armed person. Remain calm while sending people to safety. Do not panic students by telling them that the person is armed.
        5. When a “Code Red” is called:
          1. Lock your classroom door, and, if it is your responsibility to do so, lock the hallway doors. Keep your students away from doors. If you hear a weapon fired, tell your students to immediately duck and cover. Remain this way until the Principal sounds the “All Clear” or until you are evacuated from your room by law enforcement.
          2. If you are not in a classroom, move your students to the closest securable room and lock it down.
          3. If you cannot get to a classroom before shots are fired, have all students duck and cover behind any available barrier or drop and cover if there is nothing to hide behind. Direct them to move to a protected area as soon as possible.
        6. The Building Principal or designee shall notify the Superintendent’s office; the Superintendent’s office shall notify the Safety Program Coordinator.
        7. School nurses and/or other staff give first aid for victims until emergency medical services takes over. If possible, identify injured students by using name tags or markers on their wrists or ankles.
        8. Note: If any site becomes involved in a hostage situation, the primary concern is the safety of students and staff. Individuals who take hostages are frequently emotionally disturbed or in a state of panic and the key to dealing with them is to make every attempt to avoid upsetting them any further. Communication must be handled in a non-threatening, non-joking manner. Always remember that it may take very little to cause such persons to become violent.
        9. Note: Drive-by-shootings usually happen very quickly. The perpetrators of drive-by-shootings usually leave the scene instantly. Staff members who witness such incidents should, without putting themselves into danger, attempt to get as precise a description of the vehicle as possible.
      9. Emergency Aid
        The Safety Program Coordinator shall supervise an on-going program for the provision of first-aid and emergency care (see 23 Ill.Admin.Code §1.530), that includes at a minimum the following components:

        1. First-aid and CPR courses are offered to staff members.
        2. Staff members are told how to summon emergency medical care.
        3. Adequate first-aid and emergency care equipment are readily accessible, conspicuously marked, and periodically inspected.
        4. The District’s administrative procedure 465-AP6, Plan for Responding to a Medical Emergency at a Physical Fitness Facility, is fully implemented.
        5. Each participant in an extracurricular sport must present a completed Certificate of Physical Fitness for Athletics. Parents/guardians are required to report any serious health problem their child might have experienced.
        6. Written accident reports are completed by the person having supervision over the student at the time of the accident and shall be immediately sent to the Building Principal who will forward a copy to the Superintendent.
        7. An injured student will take priority over everything else. The person having supervision over an injured student shall immediately notify the parents/guardians.

    Emergency Phone Numbers:

    Safety Coordinator(815) 692-2504
    Poison Control(800) 222-1222
    Hospital(815) 842-2828
    Fire, Police, Ambulance911
    • Managing a Crisis After the Earliest Stages Are Over
      1. The Safety Program Coordinator and Safety Team shall:
        1. Advise the Superintendent whether or not to maintain normal schedules or dismiss early. This decision will depend on the extent of the crisis and may vary from class to class, or school to school. Formulate plans if school is to be dismissed early.
        2. Communicate with school counselors.
        3. Help the designated spokesperson (see “Managing Communications About a Crisis,” below) prepare announcements to: (1) students and teachers, (2) telephone inquiries, (3) parents/guardians, and (4) the media.
        4. Help the designated spokesperson (see “Managing Communications About a Crisis,” below) prepare a memo to all teachers giving the facts about the crisis and instructions on how to share the information with students, as well as suggestions for assisting students. This memo may also invite the staff to a meeting after school. Also, facilitate a way for the teachers to share their insights, concerns and other pertinent information.
        5. Help the designated spokesperson (see “Managing Communications About a Crisis,” below) prepare a letter to parents/guardians. Include specific factual information about the event; information about how the District is handling the crisis, phone numbers for contact people: information about community resources, including phone numbers and titles of resource books. Some parents/guardians will need to be contacted by phone, particularly if their child’s reaction is severe.
        6. Supervise pre-designated rooms for media, family, etc.
        7. Arrange for responsible adults to ride buses in the vacant victims’ seats for the rest of the week.
      2. The school counselor, school psychologist, and/or social worker shall:
        1. Stay in close contact with the Safety Team and follow its requests.
        2. Identify high-risk students, staff, and parents likely to be most affected by the news (e.g., due to relationship with victim, personal history with similar crisis, recent confrontations with affected students, staff member spouses). Target these individuals for extra support.
        3. Gather and inform closest friends of the victims. Provide support and information to them before the general announcement is made. If certain close friends are absent, assure that a supportive adult gives the news to them. Try to make sure that students who are closest to the victims are picked up by parents at school.
        4. Provide individual and group counseling as needed.
        5. Contact parents of affected students with suggestions for support and further referrals. Keep records of affected students and provide follow-up services.
        6. Establish a self-referral procedure. Make referral forms available.
        7. Review and distribute open-ended questions to assist teachers with classroom discussion.
      3. The Building Principal or designee shall:
        1. Support response efforts, be available for consultation, and defer to the Safety Program Coordinator and/or Superintendent. Overall, the Building Principal should be visible, available, and supportive.
        2. Notify feeder schools so they can prepare siblings and other students regarding the crisis.
        3. Provide direction for teachers.
        4. Contact family of the deceased and inform staff and students about funeral arrangements.
      4. Teachers shall:
        1. Provide available information to students and lead classroom discussions, when warranted, that focus on coping. Answer questions without providing unnecessary details. Recognize and honor the various religious beliefs that may help students to cope. Be understanding and receptive to students’ expressions of various emotions.
        2. Be careful of TV broadcasts in the classroom. Live newscasts can be traumatizing, especially if the students are still at school.
        3. Identify students who need counseling and refer them to counseling personnel.
        4. Provide activities to reduce trauma, such as artwork, music, and writing.
        5. Alter the curriculum as needed.
        6. Discuss funeral procedures when appropriate.
        7. Know how to get assistance from other professionals should the need arise.
      5. The school nurse shall, after all injured students are stabilized and being provided emergency medical services care:
        1. Monitor reactions of traumatized children.
        2. Inform teachers and children about physical manifestations of grief.
      6. Provision for on-going opportunities to deal with the crisis include:
        1. Have additional support staff and outside professionals available.
        2. Make resources available to teachers who will be dealing with students’ reactions.
        3. Provide a list of suggested readings to teachers, parents, and students.
        4. Amend crisis response procedures as necessary.
        5. Write thank-you notes to anyone who provided (or is still providing) support.
        6. Be alert on crisis anniversaries and holidays. Often students will experience an “anniversary” grief reaction the following month or year on the date of the crisis, or when similar crises occur that remind them of the original crisis. Holidays are often difficult for students who have experienced loss.
        7. Support and explain the hospital’s visitation policy.
        8. After one week, consider raising the flag back to full mast. Remove the flowers, cards, displays, etc. and get the building back to normal.
    • Managing Communications About a Crisis
      The Safety Program Coordinator, with assistance from the Safety Team, is responsible for compiling information and preparing communications concerning a crisis. Staff members having information should provide it to the Safety Program Coordinator or a Safety Team member. The Safety Program Coordinator or designee serves as the designated spokesperson. All District communication should come from this source to ensure accuracy and creditability.All staff members are requested to refrain from spreading information about a crisis unless the information is from the Safety Program Coordinator or designated spokesperson.Office staff members are not to repeat or give any information within or outside the school unless specifically instructed to do so. They are to direct inquiries to the designated spokesperson.The designated spokesperson shall make every effort to give the maximum amount of verified information to staff members, students’ family members, and the media as quickly as possible. If the media makes reporting errors, the spokesperson should name the specific reporting agency in correcting the facts.Everyone in the school community can positively affect a crisis situation by:

      1. Staying calm and helping to bring the situation under control.
      2. Avoiding speculation as to the incident’s cause.
      3. Avoiding the assignment of blame.
      4. Helping school and law enforcement officials gather the facts – who, what, where, when, why, how, and what’s next.
      5. Being truthful.
      6. Deferring all media requests to the designated spokesperson.
      7. Comforting and supporting each other.
    • Required Notices

    A school staff member shall immediately notify the office of the Building Principal if he or she: (1) observes any person in possession of a firearm on or around school grounds; however, such action may be delayed if immediate notice would endanger students under his or her supervision; (2) observes or has reason to suspect that any person on school grounds is or was involved in a drug-related incident; or (3) observes a battery committed against any staff member. Upon receiving such a report, the Building Principal or designee shall immediately notify the local law enforcement agency, State Police, and any involved student’s parent/guardian. “School grounds” includes modes of transportation to school activities and any public way within 1000 feet of the school, as well as school property itself.

    Approved: November 17, 2005
    Amended:  January 19, 2012

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    Article 465-AP2 – Administrative Procedure – Criminal Offender Notification Laws

    Operational Services
    Administrative Procedure – Criminal Offender Notification Laws

    The following list describes laws protecting students on school grounds from individuals convicted of serious crimes:

    1. A child sex offender is prohibited from being present on school property or loitering within 500 feet of school property when persons under the age of 18 are present unless specifically permitted by statute (720 ILCS 5/11-9.3).
    2. Law enforcement must notify schools of offenders who reside or are employed in the county. See: (a) Sex Offender Community Notification Law, 730 ILCS 152/101 et seq., and (b) Child Murderer and Violent Offender Against Youth Community Notification Law, 730 ILCS 154/75-105. These laws are hereafter referred to as “offender notification laws.”
    3. The School Code (105 ILCS 5/10-21.9, amended by P.A. 96-431) lists criminal offenses that disqualify an individual from District employment if the individual was convicted of one. It requires any person hired by the District to submit to a fingerprint-based criminal history records check. The law also requires a school district to check 2 offender databases for each applicant, (a) the Statewide Sex Offender Database (a/k/a Sex Offender Registry), www.isp.state.il.us/cmvo/, and (b) the Statewide Child Murderer and Violent Offender Against Youth Database, www.isp.state.il.us/cmvo/.
    4. The provisions in the School Code described above also apply to employees of persons or firms holding contracts with a school district who have direct, daily contact with students.
    5. Conviction of an offense listed in 105 ILCS 5/10-21.9, amended by P.A. 96-431, results in the automatic revocation of a teacher’s teaching certificate (105 ILCS 5/21-23a).
    6. The offender notification laws require law enforcement to ascertain whether a juvenile sex offender or violent offender against youth is enrolled in a school and, if so, to provide a copy of the registration form to the Building Principal and any guidance counselor designated by him or her. This registration form must be kept separately from any and all school records maintained on behalf of the juvenile sex offender.

    Receipt of the Information from Law Enforcement

    The Superintendent or designee shall notify local law enforcement officials or county sheriff that he or she is the District’s official contact person for purposes of the offender notification laws. The Superintendent and/or Building Principal may at any time request information from law enforcement officials regarding sex offenders or violent offenders against youth.

    The Superintendent will provide Building Principals and other supervisors with a copy of all lists received from law enforcement officials containing the names and addresses of child sex offenders and violent offenders against youth.

    The Building Principal or designee shall provide the lists to staff members in his or her building on a need-to-know basis, but in any event:

    • A teacher will be told if one of his or her students, or a student’s parent/guardian, is on a list.
    • The school counselor, nurse, social worker, or other school service personnel will be told if a student or the parent/guardian of a student for whom he or she provides services is on a list.

    No person receiving a list shall provide it to any other person, except as provided in these procedures, State law, or as authorized by the Superintendent. Requests for information should be referred to the local law enforcement officials or State Police.

    Screening Individuals Who Are Likely to Have Contact with Students at School or School Events

    Upon receiving a list of sex offenders or violent offenders against youth from law enforcement, the Superintendent or Building Principal, or designees, shall determine if anyone is listed who is currently a District employee, student teacher, or school volunteer.

    In addition, the Superintendent and/or building principal(s) shall screen individuals who are likely to come in contact with students at school or school events as follows:

    Volunteers

    Each staff member shall submit to the Building Principal the name and address of each volunteer the staff member is supervising or whose services are being used as soon as that person is identified. The Building Principal or designee shall immediately screen the volunteer’s name and address against: (1) National Sex Offender Public Registry, www.nsopr.gov, (2) Illinois Sex Offender Registry, www.isp.state.il.us/cmvo/, and (3) the violent offenders against youth database maintained by the State Police, www.isp.state.il.us/cmvo/. If a match is found, the Building Principal shall notify the Superintendent, who shall contact the local law enforcement officials to confirm or disprove the match.

    If a match is confirmed, the Superintendent shall inform the individual, by mail and telephone call, that he or she may not be used as a volunteer. The Superintendent also shall inform relevant staff members and the Building Principal that the individual may not be used as a volunteer.

    Student Teachers and Other Students Doing Clinical Experience

    The student teacher’s higher education institution will facilitate the required background check with the Department of State Police and FBI. The Department of State Police and FBI will furnish records of convictions (unless expunged) pursuant to the fingerprint-based criminal history records check, to the higher education institution where the student teacher is enrolled and the Superintendent. See 105 ILCS 5/10-21.9(g), amended by P.A. 96-1452. Each student teacher must provide a written authorization for, and payment of the costs of, the fingerprint-based criminal history records check and checks of the Statewide Sex Offender Database and Statewide Child Murderer and Violent Offender Against Youth Database prior to participating in any field experiences in the District.

    Other Students Doing Clinical Experience

    The Building Principal shall screen the name and address of each student seeking to do clinical experience in the school as described above for volunteers. If a match is found, the Building Principal and Superintendent shall proceed as above for volunteers.

    Contractors’ Employees

    The Superintendent shall include the following in all District contracts that may involve an employee of the contractor having any contact, direct or indirect, with a student:

    The contractor shall not send to any school building or school property any employee or agent who would be prohibited from being employed by the District due to a conviction of a crime listed in 105 ILCS 5/10-21.9, amended by P.A. 96-431, or who is listed in the Statewide Sex Offender Registry or the Statewide Violent Offender Against Youth Database. The contractor shall obtain a fingerprint-based criminal history records check before sending any employee or agent to any school building or school property. Additionally, at least quarterly, the contractor shall check if an employee or agent is listed on the Statewide Sex Offender Registry or the Statewide Violent Offender Against Youth Database.

    If a staff member at any time becomes aware or suspicious that a contractor’s employee is a sex offender or violent offender against youth, the employee shall immediately notify the Superintendent. The Superintendent shall screen the name of the individual as described above for volunteers and/or contact the contractor.

    Individuals in the Proximity of a District’s School

    Each time a list of sex offenders and/or violent offenders against youth is received from a law enforcement official, the Building Principal shall review it to determine if anyone listed lives in the proximity of his or her school. The Building Principal shall attempt to alter school bus stops and the route students travel to and from school in order to avoid contact with an individual on such a list.

    Employees

    All applicants considered for District employment shall submit to a fingerprint-based criminal history records check, according to State law and School Board policy. See 105 ILCS 5/10-21.9, amended by P.A. 96-1452.

    Each time a list of sex offenders or violent offenders against youth is received from a law enforcement official, the Superintendent shall review the list to determine if an employee is on the list. If a match is found, the Superintendent shall immediately contact the local police officials to confirm or disprove the match. The Superintendent shall immediately notify the Board if a match is confirmed. The Board President will contact the Board Attorney and the Board will take the appropriate action to comply with State law that may include terminating the individual’s employment.

    Informing Staff Members and Parents/Guardians About the Law

    Building Principals or their designees shall inform parents/guardians about the availability of information concerning sex offenders during school registration and, if feasible, during parent-teacher conferences. Information should be distributed about the Statewide Sex Offender Database (a/k/a Sex Offender Registry), www.isp.state.il.us/cmvo/, and the Statewide Child Murderer and Violent Offender Against Youth Database, www.isp.state.il.us/cmvo/. Information may also be included in Student Handbooks. See the Sex Offender Community Notification Law, 730 ILCS 152/101 et seq.

    Requests for additional information shall be referred to local law enforcement officials.

    APPROVED: November 17, 2005
    AMENDED:  January 19, 2012

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    Article 465-AP3 – Administrative Procedure – School Bus Safety Rules

    Operational Services
    Administrative Procedure – School Bus Safety Rules

    The Building Principal shall distribute the following rules to all students. Those students not qualifying for school bus transportation to and from school should receive a copy because they may from time-to-time be transported to school activities by school bus.

    1. Dress properly for the weather. Make sure all drawstrings, ties, straps, etc. on all clothing, backpacks and other items, are shortened or removed to lessen the likelihood of them getting caught in bus doors, railings or aisles.
    2. Arrive on time at the bus stop and stay away from the street while waiting for the bus.
    3. Stay away from the bus until it stops completely and the driver signals you to board. Enter in single file without pushing. Always use the handrail.
    4. Take a seat right away and remain seated facing forward. Keep your hands, arms, and head inside the bus.
    5. Help keep the bus neat and clean. Keep belongings out of the aisle and away from emergency exits. Eating and drinking are not allowed on the bus.
    6. Always listen to the driver’s instructions. Be courteous to the driver and other students. Sit with your hands and feet to yourself and avoid making noises that would distract the driver or bother other passengers. Remain seated, keeping your hands, arms, feet and head inside the bus at all times.
    7. Wait until the bus pulls to a complete stop before standing up. Use the handrail when exiting the bus.
    8. Stay out of the danger zone next to the bus where the driver may have difficulty seeing you. Take five giant steps away from the bus and out of the danger zone, until you can see the driver and the driver sees you. Never crawl under a bus.
    9. If you must cross the street after you get off the bus, wait for the driver’s signal and then cross in front of the bus. Cross the street only after checking both ways for traffic.
    10. Never run back to the bus, even if you dropped or forgot something.

    APPROVED: November 17, 2005
    AMENDED:  January 19, 2012

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    Article 465-AP4 – Administrative Procedure – National Terrorism Advisory System

    Operational Services
    Administrative Procedure – National Terrorism Advisory System

    The National Terrorism Advisory System (NTAS) replaced the Homeland Security Advisory System (HSAS). The HSAS was a color-coded scale in which each color corresponded to a particular risk of terrorist attack. Instead of a color-coded scale, NTAS provides information that is specific to a credible threat.

    Posting of NTAS Alerts

    NTAS Alerts are only issued when credible information is available. NTAS Alerts are announced by the Secretary of Homeland Security, and are posted at www.dhs.gov/alerts. Additionally, the Department of Homeland Security distributes the alerts to the news media and across its social media channels.

    Levels of Information Available  

    Depending on the circumstances, the NTAS Alert may include information pertaining to the threat’s nature, the geographic region, mode of transportation, or critical infrastructure potentially affected by the threat, as well as steps that individuals and communities can take to protect themselves and help prevent, mitigate, or respond to the threat. NTAS Alerts carry an expiration date and will be automatically cancelled on that date. Updates to an Alert, as well the cancellation of an Alert, will be distributed in the same way as the original Alert.

    Threat Levels

    NTAS Alerts will state whether a threat is elevated or imminent as follows:

    A threat is elevated if there is no specific information about the timing or location.

    A threat is imminent if the threat is believed to be impending or occurring very soon.

    District Response Measures

    The following position is responsible for tracking NTAS Alerts and disseminating NTAS Alerts that merit administrative review:                                                                                      .

    After receiving an NTAS Alert, each administrator shall review the information contained in it and determine what response measures, if any, should be taken. To determine the appropriate response, the administrator should gauge the threat to District activities for which he or she is responsible and examine the suggested response measures below. Administrators should strongly consider closing the school whenever there is an imminent threat to the District.

    Risk Level to District as Determined by District Administrators after Reviewing an NTAS AlertPotential Response Measures in Addition to Those Suggested by the NTAS Alert
    Low or general risk of terrorist attackResponse measures:
    Update the school emergency operations plan, specifically the emergency plans with county, State, and federal agencies.
    Instruct employees and students to report suspicious activities or persons to the administrative office.
    Conduct emergency and disaster response training for employees at all levels.
    Implement visitor control procedures.
    Inventory emergency supplies and equipment.
    Maintain current emergency communication lists.
    Review parent/guardian notification procedures.
    Disseminate emergency communications methods and resources (i.e., where to get information) to employees, parents, and community.
    Significant risk of terrorist attackIn addition to the measures listed above, the following responses may be instituted:
    Assess increased risk with public safety officials.
    Review schools' emergency operations plan with all staff.
    Reassess facility security measures, e.g., lock exterior doors.
    Limit visitor access to school.
    Update employee and student emergency contact numbers.
    Test alternative communication capabilities.
    Test parent/guardian notification procedures.
    High risk of terrorist attackIn addition to the measures listed above, the following responses may be instituted:
    Take additional precautions at public events, e.g., hiring additional security staff, restricting public access, or canceling the event.
    Review field and class trip decisions.
    Designate an alternative communications center located off school property.
    Increase communication with parents/guardians and community via website and email distribution.
    Inform parents/guardians of procedures to reunite children with parents/guardians should schools close mid-day.
    Severe risk of terrorist attackIn addition to measures listed above, the following measures may be instituted:
    Assess threat circumstances to determine status of school openings and closings.
    Address critical emergency needs under the direction of public safety officials.
    Review and communicate parent-child reunification process.
    Increase building security throughout the school system.
    Continue staff, parent, and community communication.

    If school is open:
    Cancel outside activities and field trips.
    Curtail regular and/or extracurricular bus service.
    Prohibit visitor access.
    Request police department to increase patrols around school.
    Prohibit parking near buildings.
    In case of a building lockdown, ensure each school building has a reasonable supply of food, drinking water, medical supplies, back-up communication equipment, generator, batteries, etc.

    To access NTAS Alerts please refer to the following link:

    NTAS Alert Website: www.dhs.gov/alerts

    To sign up to receive NTAS Alerts via email:

    public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USDHS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USDHS_164 

    To add NTAS Alerts to a website:

    www.dhs.gov/files/programs/ntas-developer-resources.shtm

    For further information on the NTAS please refer to the following links:

    www.dhs.gov/files/programs/ntas.shtm

    www.dhs.gov/files/publications/ntas-public-guide.shtm

    www.dhs.gov/files/publications/ntas-questions-answers.shtm

    For a sample NTAS Alert please refer to the following link:

    www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/ntas/ntas-sample-alert.pdf

    POLICY APPROVED: November 17, 2005
    POLICY AMENDED:  January 19, 2012

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    Article 465-AP5 – Administrative Procedure – Unsafe School Choice Option

    Operational Services
    Administrative Procedure – Unsafe School Choice Option

    Beginning in 2002, NCLB required states to implement an unsafe school choice option (20 U.S.C. §7912). Illinois complied by adopting two statutes: (1) 105 ILCS 5/2-3.134 requires ISBE to maintain data and publish a list of persistently dangerous schools, and (2) 105 ILCS 5/10-21.3a requires each school board to adopt a policy governing the transfer of students within the district from a persistently dangerous school to another public school in the district. This administrative procedure implements the policy. It incorporates the guidance given by the U.S. Department of Education, Unsafe School Choice Option, Non-Regulatory Guidance, 7-23-02, www.ed.gov/policy/elsec/guid/unsafeschoolchoice.doc.

    Unsafe School Choice Option for Students in Persistently Dangerous Schools

    ActorAction
    ISBEIdentifies each Illinois school that is a persistently dangerous school as defined in 105 ILCS 5/10-21.3a (attached).
    As of June 2009, ISBE has not identified a persistently dangerous school.
    Building Principal or designeeWithin 10 calendar days of identification, or longer time if necessary, notifies by U.S. mail, the parents/guardians of students attending a persistently dangerous school, of that school's status as persistently dangerous.
    SuperintendentKeeps the Board informed as appropriate.
    Determines which, if any, schools will receive students assigned to a persistently dangerous school.
    To the extent possible, the recipient school should be making adequate yearly progress and not identified as being in school improvement, corrective action, or restructuring. The recipient school may be a public charter school.
    If a recipient school is not available in the District, the Superintendent will explore other appropriate options, e.g., intergovernmental agreements with another district to accept transfer students.
    The needs and preferences of affected students and parents/guardians will be considered.
    Forms a committee to develop and implements a corrective action plan.
    Building Principal or designeeWithin 20 calendar days of identification, or longer time if necessary, informs parents/guardians of the following:
    1. The status of the corrective action plan; and
    2. The identities of any available school or public charter school into which students may transfer.
    Parents/guardiansAs soon as possible after being informed of the unsafe school choice option, confers with the building principal concerning whether to exercise the transfer option.
    Building Principal or designeeExecutes any requested transfers as soon as possible. Transfers will be in effect at least while the original school is identified as persistently dangerous. When determining the transfer length, the Principal considers the student's ability to succeed if returned to the transferring school.
    Superintendent or designeeUpon corrective action plan's completion, requests that ISBE remove the school from the list of persistently dangerous schools.

    Unsafe School Choice Option for Any Student Who Is a Victim of a Violent Criminal Offense Occurring on School Grounds During Regular School Hours or During a School-Sponsored Event

    ActorAction
    Building Principal or designeeNotifies the Superintendent that as student was a victim of a violent crime, as defined by 725 ILCS 120/3 (attached), occurring on school grounds during regular school hours or during a school-sponsored event.
    SuperintendentAs soon as possible, determines which, if any, schools are available recipients for a student who was a victim of a violent crime while in school or on school grounds.
    To the extent possible, the recipient school should be making adequate yearly progress and has not been identified as being in school improvement, corrective action, or restructuring. The recipient school may be a public charter school.
    If a recipient school is not available in the District, the Superintendent will explore other appropriate options, e.g., an agreement with a neighboring district to accept the student.
    The needs and preferences of the affected student and his or her parents/guardians shall be considered.
    Keeps the Board informed as appropriate.
    Building Principal or designeeAs soon as possible, notifies the student's parents/guardians that the student may transfer to another school, provided another school is available.
    Parents/guardiansAs soon as possible after being informed of the unsafe school choice option, confers with the building principal concerning whether to exercise the transfer option.
    Building Principal or designeeExecutes any requested transfer as soon as possible. When determining the transfer length, considers the student's educational needs as well as other factors affecting the student's ability to succeed if returned to the transferring school.

    ***********************************************************************************

    Definitions for “Persistently Dangerous School”

    105 ILCS 5/10-21.3a

    §10-21.3a(b). In order to be considered a persistently dangerous school, the school must meet all of the following criteria for 2 consecutive years:

    1. Have greater than 3% of the students enrolled in the school expelled for violence-related conduct;
    2. Have one or more students expelled for bringing a firearm to school as defined in 18 U.S.C. 921;
    3. Have at least 3% of students enrolled in the school exercise the individual option to transfer schools pursuant to subsection (c) of this section (105 ILCS 5/10-21.3a(c), see the second section of this procedure).

    Definitions for “Crime Victim” and “Violent Crime”

    725 ILCS 120/3 (current as of September 1, 2003)

    §3. The terms used in this Act, unless the context clearly requires otherwise, shall have the following meanings:
    (a) “Crime victim” means (1) a person physically injured in this State as a result of a violent crime perpetrated or attempted against that person or (2) a person who suffers injury to or loss of property as a result of a violent crime perpetrated or attempted against that person or (3) a single representative who may be the spouse, parent, child or sibling of a person killed as a result of a violent crime perpetrated against the person killed or the spouse, parent, child or sibling of any person granted rights under this Act who is physically or mentally incapable of exercising such rights, except where the spouse, parent, child or sibling is also the defendant or prisoner or (4) any person against whom a violent crime has been committed or (5) any person who has suffered personal injury as a result of a violation of Section 11-501 of the Illinois Vehicle Code, or of a similar provision of a local ordinance, or of Section 9-3 of the Criminal Code of 1961, as amended.

    (c) “Violent Crime” means any felony in which force or threat of force was used against the victim, or any offense involving sexual exploitation, sexual conduct or sexual penetration, domestic battery, violation of an order of protection, stalking, or any misdemeanor which results in death or great bodily harm to the victim or any violation of Section 9-3 of the Criminal Code of 1961, or Section 11-501 of the Illinois Vehicle Code, or a similar provision of a local ordinance, if the violation resulted in personal injury or death, and includes any action committed by a juvenile that would be a violent crime if committed by an adult. For the purposes of this paragraph, “personal injury” shall include any Type A injury as indicated on the traffic accident report completed by a law enforcement officer that requires immediate professional attention in either a doctor’s office or medical facility. A Type A injury shall include severely bleeding wounds, distorted extremities, and injuries that require the injured party to be carried from the scene.

    APPROVED: November 17, 2005
    AMENDED:  January 19, 2012

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    Article 465-AP6 – Administrative Procedure – Plan for Responding to a Medical Emergency at an Indoor Physical Fitness Facility

    Operational Services
    Administrative Procedure – Plan for Responding to a Medical Emergency at an Indoor Physical Fitness Facility

    The following operations implement School Board policy 465, Safety, requiring a plan for responding to medical emergencies at an indoor physical fitness facility. These operations shall be completed consistent with the Physical Fitness Facility Medical Emergency Procedures Act, 210 ILCS 74; the Illinois Department of Public Health Rules, Part 527, “Physical Fitness Medical Emergency Preparedness Code;” and Prairie Central’s Emergency Response Protocol.

    Role of the Superintendent

    The Superintendent appoints a staff member to coordinate the operations in this Procedure who will be known as the “Plan Coordinator.”

    Plan Coordinator:

    John Capasso                           Superintendent                        

    Name                                       Position

    The Superintendent files this plan with the Dept. of Public Health, Division of EMS & Highway Safety, 500 E. Monroe – 8th Floor, Springfield, IL 62701. 77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.400(a). Files an updated plan with the IDPH after a change in the facility that affects the ability to comply with a medical emergency, such as the facility was closed for more than 45 days. 77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.400(c).

    Dates plan submitted:

                                                                                                               

                                                                                                               

    The Superintendent decides, with input from the Plan Coordinator, the schedule for purchasing AEDs. 210 ILCS 74/50.

    Indoor Facility – Every district must have all applicable facilities equipped with an AED.

    Outdoor Facility – A district with 4 or fewer physical fitness facilities must have at least two such facilities in compliance; its third facility by July 1, 2011; and its fourth facility by July 1, 2012. A district with more than 4 physical fitness facilities must have 50% of those facilities in compliance; 75% by July 1, 2011; and 100% by July 1, 2012.

    If the AED becomes inoperable, the district must replace or repair it within 30 days. 77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.600.

    Designates each Building Principal as the individual who must be notified in the event of a medical emergency. 77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.400(a).

    BuildingOffice Contact
    Chatsworth ElementaryKaren Hazelrigg
    Chenoa ElementaryDaniel Groce
    Meadowbrook ElementaryPatricia Boyd
    Westview ElementaryBrian Quam
    Prairie Central Upper ElementaryPaula Crane
    Prairie Central Junior HighTonya Dieken
    Prairie Central High SchoolDaniel Casillas

    The Superintendent follows the requirements of 77 Ill.Admin.Code §525.500 upon receiving a completed report that an AED was used.

    Role of Plan Coordinator

    Responsibilities Concerning Emergency Responders

    With the Building Principal, the plan coordinator identifies all staff members who, through their education or training, are appropriate emergency responders for specific facilities. If possible, train all emergency responders in CPR and AED use.

    Facility                                                Emergency Response Providers

    All facilities                                         All staff                                  

                                                                                                               

                                                                                                               

    Responsibilities Concerning AED Users

    The plan coordinator determines the appropriate number of trained AED users and anticipated rescuers or users needed for each facility equipped with an AED. Each facility with an AED must have at least one trained AED user on staff during staffed business hours (210 ILCS 74/15, amended by P.A. 96-748) and take reasonable measures to ensure that anticipated rescuers or users are trained pursuant to 410 ILCS 4/15 and 77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.800.

    Working with the Building Principal, the plan coordinator identifies trained AED users and requests that other appropriate staff members and anticipated rescuers or users become trained.

    Facility                                                 Trained AED Users

    All facilities                                         All staff                                  

                                                                                                                 

                                                                                                                 

    Responsibilities Concerning AED Registration

    The plan coordinator coordinates with local emergency medical services systems (77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.500).   The plan coordinator notifies an agent of the local emergency communications or vehicle dispatch center of the existence, location, and type of the automated external defibrillator (410 ILCS 4/20(b); 77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.500).

    The plan coordinator makes any other required notifications in accordance with 77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.500.

    Responsibilities Concerning Location of AED and Other First Aid Equipment

    Indoor Facility – The plan coordinator decides, with input from the Building Principal or designee, where to place the AED and other first aid equipment so that their location will be conspicuous, easily accessible, and convenient; the AED must be mobile and accessible at all times (77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.600).

    Outdoor Facility – The plan coordinator ensures that the AED is placed within 300 feet of the outdoor facility in an open building with unimpeded access that has marked directions to the location of the AED at its entrances (77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.600 (c)).

    FacilityNumberFirst Aid and AED Location
    Chatsworth Elementary1East wall across from office
    Chenoa Elementary1Middle hall, east of main office
    Meadowbrook Elementary1Hallway, west of office, near gym
    Westview Elementary1East wall, north of office
    Prairie Central Upper Elementary1Commons area
    Prairie Central Junior High3West hallway; east hallway; portable
    Prairie Central High School4Near office; vocational wing; 2nd floor, at north turn; portable

    The plan coordinator keeps a copy of the AED’s manual with the AED (77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.700(b)).

    Responsibilities Concerning Notification and Posting

    Along with the Building Principal, the plan coordinator notifies all staff members of the location of any AEDs as well as the instructions for responding to medical emergencies (77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.800(b)).

    Responsibilities Concerning Training

    The plan coordinator coordinates, with input from the Building Principal, the training of: (1) all staff members who regularly supervise students in physical fitness facilities in the use of CPR and, if appropriate, AEDs, and (2) any non-employee coaches, instructors or other similarly situated anticipated rescuers or users (77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.800 and 210 ILCS 74/15(b-5) and (b-10)).

    Responsibilities Concerning Instructions for Responding to Medical Emergencies

    Along with the Building Principal, the plan coordinator notifies all facility staff of the location of any AEDs and the Step-by-Step Emergency Response Plan described below (77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.800(b)).

    The plan coordinator coordinates, along with the Building Principal, the posting of the Step-by-Step Emergency Response Plan described below (77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.800(b)).

    Responsibilities Concerning Maintenance and Testing of AEDs

    The plan coordinator ensures that all AEDs are maintained and tested according to manufacturer’s guidelines (77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.700(a)).

    Keeps a copy of the maintenance and testing manual at the facility and keeps a copy of the manual with each AED (77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.700(b)).

    Role of Building Administration
    In a conspicuous place in the physical fitness facility, the building administrator posts: (1) the list of all staff members who are emergency responders, and (2) the Step-by-Step Emergency Response Plan described below (77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.400(a)).

    The building administrator posts a notice at the facility’s main entrance stating that an AED is located on the premises.

    The building administrator receives notice in the event of a medical emergency (77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.400(a)).]

    Role of School Nurse
    Along with the Plan Coordinator, the school nurse helps staff members understand the instructions for responding to medical emergencies.

    These instructions must provide that the AED should be operated only by trained AED users, unless the circumstances do not allow time to be spent waiting for a trained AED user to arrive (77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.800(c)).

    Role of Trained AED Users and/or Other Emergency Responders
    According to their training, the AED user uses appropriate emergency responses upon the occurrence of any sudden, serious, and unexpected sickness or injury that would lead a reasonable person, possessing an average knowledge of medicine and health, to believe that the sick or injured person required urgent or unscheduled medical care (77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.400(a)).

    According to their training, AED users use the AED to help restore a normal heart rhythm when a person’s heart is not beating properly (77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.400(a)).

    The AED user calls 9-1-1 for medical emergencies and whenever an AED is used. 77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.400(b).

    AED user informs the Building Principal whenever the AED or other emergency response is used. 77 Ill.Admin.Code §527.400(b).

    Whenever an AED is used, the AED user completes the Automated External Defibrillator Incident Report and forwards it to the Superintendent for compliance with the requirements of 77 Ill.Admin.Code §525.500(a).

    Role of Facility Staff Members and Users
    Facility staff members follow the Step-by-Step Emergency Response Plan described below:

    1. Facility staff members immediately notify the building’s emergency responder(s) whose contact information is posted in the facility. Under life and death circumstances call 9-1-1 without delay.
    2. Facility staff members bring the first aid equipment and AED to the emergency scene. The AED should be operated only by trained AED users for the intended purpose of the AED, unless the circumstances do not allow time for a trained AED user to arrive.
    3. Facility staff members immediately inform the Building Principal or designee of the emergency.
    4. The emergency responder will take charge of the emergency. This person will apply first aid, CPR, and/or the AED, as appropriate.
    5. If necessary, the emergency responder instructs someone to call 9-1-1, providing the location in the building and which entrance to use. This person should make sure someone is sent to open the door for paramedics and guide them to the scene.
    6. When paramedics arrive and assume care of the victim, the emergency responder or other staff person notifies the victim’s parent/guardian or relative.
    7. If an AED was used, the person using it completes the Automated External Defibrillator Incident Report. If appropriate, a supervising staff member completes an accident report.
    8. If an adult refuses treatment, the emergency responder documents the refusal and, if possible, asks the adult to sign a statement stating that he or she refused treatment.

    APPROVED: January 19, 2006
    AMENDED: February 16, 2012

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    Article 465-AP6-E1 – Administrative Procedure – Exhibit – School Staff AED Notification Letter

    Operational Services
    Administrative Procedure – Exhibit – School Staff AED Notification Letter

    On District letterhead
    Date:

    To:       Staff members

    Re:       Notification to School Staff of the Physical Fitness Facility Medical Emergency Response Instructions and AED Availability

    We would like to notify you about our plan for responding to medical emergencies that might occur in our physical fitness facilities. This plan includes access to an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) in the following locations in these facilities:

    FacilityNumberFirst Aid and AED Location
    Chatsworth Elementary1East wall across from office
    Chenoa Elementary1Middle hall, east of main office
    Meadowbrook Elementary1Hallway, west of office, near gym
    Westview Elementary1East wall, north of office
    Prairie Central Upper Elementary1Commons area
    Prairie Central Junior High3West hallway; east hallway; portable
    Prairie Central High School4Near office; vocational wing; 2nd floor, at north turn; portable

    The AEDs are strategically placed and readily accessible to predetermined AED users to maximize rapid use. The AED is available during school hours and after school during any activity or program organized by the school and supervised by a school employee. The predetermined AED users are school nurses and any other person who has received AED training (American Heart Association, American Red Cross, or equivalent training) and has a completion card on file with the Superintendent. Any anticipated rescuers or users should now also be trained and certified.

    The following information is posted with each AED:

    1. Instructions to immediately call 9-1-1 and instructions for emergency care.
    2. Instructions for using an AED.

    Please contact me if you would like information on becoming a trained AED user. If you anticipate that your duties make you more likely to use an AED, you should become trained and certified. It is important to note that the Physical Fitness Facility Medical Emergency Preparedness Act and the Local Governmental and Governmental Employees Tort Immunity Act protect staff members from liability. We appreciate your support.

    Sincerely,

    John Capasso

    Superintendent & Plan Coordinator

    APPROVED:  January 19, 2006
    AMENDED:   February 16, 2012

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    Article 465-AP6-E2 – Administrative Procedure – Exhibit – School Staff AED Notification Letter

    Operational Services
    Administrative Procedure – Exhibit – School Staff AED Notification Letter

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    Article 465-AP7 – Administrative Procedure – Targeted School Violence Prevention Program

    Operational Services
    Administrative Procedure – Targeted School Violence Prevention Program

    Threat assessment procedures work best when incorporated into an overall Targeted School Violence Prevention Program strategically developed and collectively implemented by local school officials, District staff, student body members, and the community. This administrative procedure contains four sections as follows:

    1. Glossary of Terms
    2. Targeted School Violence Plan
    3. Preparedness for a Targeted School Violence Crisis, Response, and Recovery
    4. Threat Assessment (Three Phases)
      • Phase One:       Identification
      • Phase Two:      Inquiry
      • Phase Three:    Investigation

    Glossary of Terms
    Threat – An expression of intent to harm someone that may be spoken, written, or expressed in some other way, such as through gestures.

    Targeted School Violence – Includes school shootings and other school-based attacks where the school was deliberately selected as the location for the attack and was not simply a random site of opportunity.

    Targeted School Violence Prevention Program – The overall process used to create a District and school environment that is conducive to learning by identifying, managing, and preventing threats and acts of Targeted School Violence.

    Targeted School Violence Prevention Plan (TSVP Plan) – The strategic procedures used to integrate a Targeted School Violence Prevention Program into a District’s existing policies and procedures.

    Targeted School Violence Prevention Team (TSVP Team) – A District level team that the Superintendent creates to develop a Targeted School Violence Prevention Plan and oversee the District’s Targeted School Violence Prevention Program.

    Threat Assessment – A rational approach to prevent school violence through evaluating students that demonstrate potentially dangerous behavior. Developed by the U.S. Secret Service and adapted for use in school settings, it aims to first assess the seriousness of the threat and then the appropriate response to resolve it and ultimately prevent an act of Targeted School Violence.

    Threat Assessment Team – A building-level team that performs a threat assessment when activated by the Building Principal.

    It may include the Building Principal, Assistant Building Principal, School Resource Officer, School Psychologist, and School Counselor or Social Worker.

    Targeted School Violence Prevention Plan

    Following are the strategic procedures to integrate a Targeted School Violence Prevention Program into the District’s existing policies and procedures.

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    Article 465-AP7 – Administrative Procedure – Exhibit – Threat Assessment Decision Tree

    Operational Services
    Administrative Procedure – Exhibit – Threat Assessment Decision Tree

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    Article 465-AP7 – Administrative Procedure – Exhibit – Threat Assessment Documentation

    Operational Services
    Administrative Procedure – Exhibit – Threat Assessment Documentation

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    Article 465-AP7 – Administrative Procedure – Exhibit – Targeted School Violence Prevention and Threat Assessment Education

    Operational Services
    Administrative Procedure – Exhibit – Targeted School Violence Prevention and Threat Assessment Education

    On District letterhead

    Date:

    To:       District Staff and Parents

    From:   Building Principal

    Re:       Targeted School Violence Prevention Program

    Our District has a standard procedure for responding to student threats of violence.  Below is a brief synopsis of situations where school officials want individuals to bring forth information identifying a threat or situation of concern to the Building Principal.  Once identified, the Building Principal will determine whether a threat exists and whether to engage in further investigation.

    Any situation or student of concern should be brought forward.  Threat assessment is a valuable component of a comprehensive approach to preventing targeted school violence.  The identification of threats is everyone’s responsibility:  our students, parents, staff, and community members.

    What Is a Threat?

    A threat is an expression of intent to harm someone that may be spoken, written, or expressed in some other way, such as through gestures.  Threats may be direct (I’m going to beat you up or I’m going to blow this place up!) or indirect (Come and watch what I am going to do to him/her.).  A threat can be vague (I’m going to hurt him.) or implied (You better watch out.).  Any possession of a weapon or mention of one is a possible threat.  Sometimes students make threats that are in fun or may be “just kidding” but sometimes a threat is very serious and/or criminal.  When you are in doubt as to whether the statement is kidding or serious, the responsible thing to do is to report it.

    What Can Staff and Parents Do?

    Educate students about what a threat is, encourage students not to make threats in the first place, and reiterate that seeking help to prevent someone from getting hurt or hurting another is appropriate.

    APPROVED:   February 16, 2012

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    Article 465 – Exhibit – Accident or Injury Form

    Operational Services
    Exhibit – Accident or Injury Form

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    Article 465 – Exhibit – Memo to Staff Members Re Contacts by Media About a Crisis

    Operational Services
    Exhibit – Memo to Staff Members Re Contacts by Media About a Crisis

    If the media attempts to contact you about a death or other crisis, please follow these guidelines:

      • It is perfectly correct to tell a reporter that you would rather not comment on the incident especially if it has been an emotional strain. Rather than shouting “No comment” (which sounds like you are trying to hide something), say something like, “this incident has affected the school community greatly and I would prefer to not comment on it at this time.” One should then refer the reporter to the Safety Program Coordinator or the designated spokesperson.
      • According to School Board policy and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, the only information about a student that the school is allowed to release is a verification of his or her attendance at the school. If the parents give permission, certain general information (address, date and place of birth, participation in sports or activities, awards received, etc.) may also be released. In the event of parental approval, that information will be given to the media by the Superintendent or the designated spokesperson.
      • Comments such as the following should be avoided: “He was a B student,” “She was having trouble in class and I had referred her to the social worker last week,” and, of course, “He was constantly in trouble for dealing drugs and smoking on school grounds.” For the most part, it is better to avoid comments about individual students. If a reporter persists with these questions, say something like, “Board policy prohibits me from commenting on any student. Furthermore, I do not wish to infringe upon the family’s right to privacy in this matter.”
      • If you are comfortable with it, you may make comments about how the crisis has affected on you individually. If the incident involved an athlete, the coach might say, “_________’s death is very tragic and the team and I will miss him.”
      • You may also address actions the school is taking to deal with the situation. For example, “Although this is a terrible situation, we are fortunate to have a crisis plan to counsel students and faculty who are understandably upset.”
      • Do not agree to set up interviews with students. All requests for interviews should be directed to the Safety Program Coordinator or the designated spokesperson.
      • Do not speculate or comment on the cause of death, especially in an apparent suicide or murder. Tell reporters that information on the death should be obtained from the police department.
      • Remember, you do not have to answer any questions. Simply refer all reporters to the Safety Program Coordinator or the designated spokesperson.

    APPROVED: November 17, 2005
    AMENDED: February 16, 2012

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    Article 465 – Exhibit – Emergency Medical Information for Students Having Special Needs or Medical Conditions Who Ride School Buses

    Operational Services
    Exhibit – Emergency Medical Information for Students Having Special Needs or Medical Conditions Who Ride School Buses

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    Article 465 – Exhibit – Letter to Parents Regarding Student Safety

    Operational Services
    Exhibit – Letter to Parents Regarding Student Safety

    On District letterhead

    Date

    Re:       Student Safety

    Dear Parents/Guardians:

    Student safety is our District’s top priority. In addition to physical safety, the District is concerned with students’ emotional well-being and will help students cope with an emergency or disaster and its aftermath.  The following outlines our emergency and disaster response plans.

    Safety Plans
    The District has plans for all four phases of emergency and disaster management:

    1. Preparedness – planning for an emergency or disaster event;
    2. Response – planned response to an emergency or disaster event;
    3. Recovery – the process of returning to normal operations; and
    4. Mitigation – steps taken to minimize the effects of an emergency or disaster.

    These phases are covered in each school’s site-based safety plan.  In addition, the District has a Safety Program Coordinator and each school has a Crisis Management Team.

    Communications

    The District will disseminate emergency information via its website, information hotline, through the media, and by telephone contact.

    Emergency Responses

    Emergency responses will depend on the circumstances and may include lockdown or evacuation.  During a lockdown, no one may enter or leave the building until it is safe to do so.  For evacuation purposes, each school has at least one off-campus site where students and staff assemble to be accounted for and temporarily housed.

    In the unlikely event an emergency response is needed at your child’s school, staff members will be totally engaged supervising students.  We will attempt to provide information through the District’s information hotline, __________________, and/or website ______________________.

    If students are evacuated, students at                                              School will go to                                                                                                                . You may pick-up your child at this location after notifying the school official in charge.  Additional instructions will be given in the event of an evacuation, including alternative methods to return your child home.

    Cooperation and Assistance Request

    During any emergency or potential disaster and for the safety of all students and staff, please follow the instructions of the District’s Safety Program Coordinator as well as the Building Principal.  These instructions will be widely disseminated.

    Defamatory or disruptive behavior will only lessen our response effectiveness.

    If you have any questions, please feel free to contact the District office or your child’s Principal.  In the meantime, thank you for your cooperation and support.

    Website Address:                                                              

    Information Hotline Number:                                           

    Sincerely,

    John Capasso

    Superintendent

    APPROVED:   February 16, 2012

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    Article 465 – Exhibit – Informing Parents About Offender Community Notification Laws

    Operational Services
    Exhibit – Informing Parents About Offender Community Notification Laws

    On District letterhead, website, and/or in student handbook

    Date:

    To:       Parents/Guardians

    Re:       Offender Community Notification Laws

    State law requires a Building Principal or teacher to notify parents/guardians during school registration or parent-teacher conferences that information about sex offenders and violent offenders against youth is available to the public.

    You may find the Illinois Sex Offender Registry on the Illinois State Police’s website at:

    http://www.isp.state.il.us/sor/.

    You may find the Illinois Statewide Child Murderer and Violent Offender Against Youth Registry on the Illinois State Police’s website at:

    http://www.isp.state.il.us/cmvo/.

    APPROVED:         February 16, 2012

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    Article 471 – Resource Conservation

    Operational Services
    Resource Conservation

    The Superintendent or designee shall manage a program of energy and resource conservation for the District that includes:

    1. Periodic review of procurement procedures and specifications to ensure that purchased products and supplies are reusable, durable, or made from recycled materials, if economically and practically feasible.
    2. Purchasing recycled paper and paper products in amounts that will, at a minimum, meet the specifications in The School Code, if economically and practically feasible.
    3. Periodic review of procedures on the reduction of solid waste generated by academic, administrative, and other institutional functions. These procedures shall:  (a) require recycling the District’s waste stream, including landscape waste, computer paper, and white office paper, if economically and practically feasible; (b) include investigation of the feasibility of potential markets for other recyclable materials that are present in the District’s waste stream; and (c) be designed to achieve, before July 1, 2020, at least a 50% reduction in the amount of solid waste that is generated by the District.
    4. Adherence to energy conservation measures.

    LEGAL REF.:  105 ILCS 5/10-20.19c.

    APPROVED:  November 17, 2005
    AMENDED:   February 16, 2012

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    Article 471-AP – Administrative Procedure – Resource Conservation

    Operational Services
    Administrative Procedure – Resource Conservation

    Definitions

    De-inked stock – Paper that has been processed to remove inks, clays, coatings, binders, and other contaminants.

    High grade printing and writing papers – Includes offset-printing paper, duplicator paper, writing paper (stationery), tablet paper, office paper, note pads, xerographic paper, envelopes, form bond including computer paper and carbonless forms, book papers, bond papers, ledger paper, book stock, and cotton fiber papers.

    Paper and paper products – High-grade printing and writing papers, tissue products, newsprint, unbleached packaging, and recycled paperboard.

    Postconsumer material – Only those products generated by a business or consumer, that have served their intended end uses, and that have been separated or diverted from solid waste; wastes generated during the production of an end product are excluded.  Postconsumer material includes:

    • Paper, paperboard, and fibrous waste from retail stores, office buildings, homes and so forth, after the waste has passed through its end usage as a consumer item, including used corrugated boxes, old newspapers, mixed-waste paper, tabulating cards, and used cordage; and
    • All paper, paperboard, and fibrous wastes that are diverted or separated from the municipal waste stream.

    Recovered paper material – Paper waste generated after the completion of the papermaking process, such as postconsumer material, envelope cuttings, bindery trimmings, printing waste, cutting and other converting waste, butt rolls, and mill wrappers, obsolete inventories, and rejected unused stock.  “Recovered paper material,” however, does not include fibrous waste generated during the manufacturing process such as fibers recovered from waste water or trimmings of paper machine rolls (mill broke), or fibrous by-products of harvesting, extraction or woodcutting processes, or forest residues such as bark.  Recovered paper material includes:

    • Postconsumer material;
    • Dry paper and paperboard waste generated after completion of the papermaking process (that is, those manufacturing operations up to and including the cutting and trimming of the paper machine reel into smaller rolls or rough sheets), including envelope cuttings, bindery trimmings, and other paper and paperboard waste resulting from printing, cutting, forming and other converting operations, or from bag, box, and carton manufacturing, and butt rolls, mill wrappers, and rejected unused stock; and
    • Finished paper and paperboard from obsolete inventories of paper and paperboard manufacturers, merchants, wholesalers, dealers, printers, converters or others.

    Recycled paperboard – Includes paperboard products, folding cartons and pad backings.

    Tissue products Includes toilet tissue, paper towels, paper napkins, facial tissue, paper doilies, industrial wipers, paper bags, and brown papers.  These products shall also be unscented and shall not be colored.

    Unbleached packaging – Includes corrugated and fiber storage boxes.

    Procurement Procedures and Specifications for Products and Supplies

    Procurement procedures and specifications for products and supplies shall be periodically reviewed to ensure that the District is:  (a) purchasing products and supplies that are reusable, durable, or made from or contain recycled materials, if economically and practically feasible, and (b) giving preference to products and supplies containing the highest amount of recycled material and that  are consistent with the effective use of the product or supply, if economically and practically feasible.

    Recycled Paper and Paper Products Purchases

      1. Whenever economically and practically feasible, recycled paper and paper products shall be purchased according to the following minimum percentages of the District’s total dollar value of paper and paper products:
        • Beginning July 1, 2008 – 10%
        • Beginning July 1, 2011 – 25%
        • Beginning July 1, 2014 – 50%
        • Beginning July 1, 2020 – 75%

    All paper purchased for publishing student newspapers must be recycled newsprint.  Paper and paper products purchased from private sector vendors pursuant to printing contracts are exempted from this requirement.

    1. Wherever economically and practically feasible, recycled paper and paper products shall contain postconsumer or recovered paper materials as follows:
      • Recycled high grade printing and writing paper shall contain at least 50% recovered paper material and shall consist of the following percentages of deinked stock or postconsumer material on the dates listed:
        • Beginning July 1, 2008 – 25%
        • Beginning July 1, 2010 – 30%
        • Beginning July 1, 2012 – 40%
        • Beginning July 1, 2014 – 50%
      • Recycled tissue products shall contain at least 45% postconsumer material.
      • Recycled newsprint shall contain at least 80% postconsumer material.
      • Recycled unbleached packaging shall contain at least 55% postconsumer material.
      • Recycled paperboard shall contain at least 95% postconsumer material.

    These regulations do not apply to art materials, nor to any newspapers, magazines, textbooks, library books or other copyrighted publications that are purchased or used by the District or any school or attendance center within the District, or that are sold in any school supply store operated by or within any such school or attendance center.

    Solid Waste Reduction

    The Superintendent will appoint a team of interested individuals representing various District departments to direct the District’s efforts to achieve, before July 1, 2020, at least a 50% reduction in the amount of solid waste that the District generates.  The team shall:

    1. Periodically review methods and procedures to reduce solid waste generated by academic, administrative, and other institutional functions. These procedures must be designed to, when economically and practically feasible, recycle the District’s waste stream, including without limitation landscape waste, computer paper, and white office paper.
    2. Identify indicators to monitor the District’s progress toward achieving the solid waste reduction goal. As necessary, the procedures and methods shall be adjusted and refined.
    3. Make periodic progress reports to the Superintendent or designee.

    The team shall devise and oversee methods for making the following activities part of the District culture:

    1. Staff members actively pursue waste reduction and prevention activities. Examples include:
      1. Printing and copying individual documents on both sides of the page.
      2. Setting computer software for default two-sided printing including word processing, spreadsheets, electronic mail, and others.
      3. Printing or copying only the pages needed.
      4. Routing memos and newsletters.
      5. Providing trays to collect and reuse one-sided paper.
      6. Reducing unwanted mail and eliminate excess mailings.
    2. Staff members and students seek to reuse or recycle materials to divert them from the waste stream whenever possible.
    3. A training plan instructs staff members and students in waste reduction and recycling practices.
    4. The District’s solid waste reduction program is publicized and its benefits are emphasized, including cost savings by lowering supply acquisition and disposal costs.
    5. An incentive program to reduce solid waste exists, e.g., through school recognition programs.
    6. Staff and students are encouraged to be innovative and suggest improvements to procedures and practices.

    LEGAL REF.: 105 ILCS 5/10-20.19c.

    APPROVED:  February 16, 2012

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    Article 480 – Risk Care Management – Personnel

    Operational Services
    Risk Care Management

    The safety of every student, employee, visitor or member of the public using school facilities or on school property is a matter of serious concern at all times. School buildings and grounds shall be regularly inspected for health, fire and safety hazards. Employees shall be alert to hazardous practices or situations, especially when students are moving about within the buildings or on playgrounds or other school property. Rules, practices and understandings shall be developed and followed which will anticipate and eliminate potential hazardous conditions.

    All personnel shall share in the responsibility for observing and reporting hazardous conditions that develop within the buildings or on school grounds. In addition, it is the responsibility of each and every employee to be fully aware of the condition of their work area and the equipment used in the performance of their duties and to recognize, report and responsibly handle potentially hazardous conditions, which may exist.

    All employees shall be well-rehearsed in and familiar with the District’s Crisis Management Plan, as it may exist from time to time, and as the plan applies to their work sites. In the event of an emergency, employees shall follow the appropriate reporting and response procedures as developed by the Superintendent or his/her designee.

    APPROVED: November 17, 2005

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    Article 480-AP – Administrative Procedure – Risk Care Management

    Operational Services
    Administrative Procedure – Risk Care Management

    Prairie Central Community Unit School District #8 shall have in operation a comprehensive Risk Management Program that shall reduce or prevent the District’s exposure to liability.  It is of the utmost importance for the District: (1) to ensure that statutory and common law, health and safety rights are extended to all visitors, employees, and students;  (2) to make certain that the District’s buildings and grounds are maintained in a safe condition; and (3) to provide careful supervision and protection of all the District’s real and personal property, including vehicles.

    The Illinois local Government and Governmental Tort Immunity Act (Ill. Rev. Stat., Ch. 85, 1-101 et seq) provides for a school district to levy a tax which when collected will pay the cost of Risk Care Management.  In addition, Section (9-107) provides for funds raised pursuant to this Section to be used:

    …to pay the operating and administrative costs and expenses including the cost of legal services and the wages and salaries of employees in connection with defending or otherwise protecting itself against any liability or loss described hereinabove and under Federal or State common or statutory law, the Workers’ Compensation Act, the Workers’ Occupation Disease Act and the Unemployment Insurance Act, to purchase insurance, to purchase claim services, to pay for judgments or settlements, or to provide protection to the local public entity or its employees or, pursuant to an intergovernmental contract, other local public entities or their employees.

    The District’s Risk Management Program shall provide for: (1) Identification of the various components of the Program, (2) Clearly delineated personnel responsibilities, (3) Adequate insurance against liability exposure, (4) Identified and allowable costs for the maintenance of the Risk Management Program.

    Superintendent
    The general overall responsibility for the development and maintenance of the District’s Risk Management Program rests with the Superintendent of Schools.  The Superintendent shall be responsible for development of the Program, identifying the various components of the Program, and delegating responsibilities for those components to the appropriate personnel, as necessity indicates.  It is expected that the Superintendent would continually evaluate the effectiveness of the Program and be apprised of needed revisions, additions, or deletions to the components and assigned responsibilities.  A primary component of the Risk Management Program is the provision of an Insurance/Compensation Program that will provide protection to the District against liability.  The Superintendent, who serves in a business official capacity, is assigned the responsibility for the administration of the component of Risk Management Program.  He/she shall be the District’s liaison to the various consulting services, claim and adjustment services, and insurance companies.  In addition he/she shall be responsible for all communications concerning claims against, or on behalf of, the District.  Because the Superintendent is responsible for the insurance and claims component of the Risk Management Program, remediation and the District’s Transportation Risk Management, it is expected that he/she will devote ten percent (10%) of his/her time toward fulfillment of these duties.

    Chief of Maintenance/Custodians
    The District’s Risk Management Program in relation to the safe conditions of the buildings and grounds, and protection of the District’s real and personal property, shall primarily be the responsibility of the Chief of Maintenance/Custodial staff members.  Their responsibilities and duties shall include, but not be limited to:

    1. The development and identification of the various components of responsibilities concerning inspection of buildings, grounds and equipment to provide protection to the local district, its students, employees, and the public. Within this parameter, they shall be responsible for the daily inspection of said buildings and grounds, the development and operation of the District’s building security.
    2. The maintenance of the legal and safe conditions of buildings and grounds. They are responsible for the District’s compliance with State and federal Laws regarding students, employees and the general public’s health and safety.  Custodial/Maintenance staff shall routinely inspect said buildings and grounds for unsafe conditions and make recommendations for addressing those deficiencies.
    3. Assist in the coordination of all personnel performing maintenance duties within the Risk Management Program. It is expected that all contractual/ regular custodians would devote ten (10%) percent of their time in daily inspection of their respective building or grounds responsibilities to ensure a risk-free environment.
    4. The awareness of, support and assistance to, contractual services in such a manner that the District meets all the requirements for freedom from tort situations.

    Bus Drivers
    It is expected that bus drivers will spend approximately ten percent (10%) of their time to ensure that their vehicle is free from any situation that would produce risk or tort possibilities.  Their duties will include the drivers’ daily inspection of their buses for safety problems and supervision of students riding the bus.

    Behind-the-Wheel Drivers Education Teachers
    All district Behind the Wheel Drivers’ Education teachers are responsible for safety inspections of vehicles, both for student and employee safety and protection of District property.  This component of the Driver Education Teacher responsibility is assumed to account for ten percent (10%) of the teacher’s time.

    Building-Level Administrators, Miscellaneous Teachers
    The District’s Risk Management Program in relation to the health and safety of District students and personnel is a substantial responsibility of the building principals.  The degree of this responsibility (time commitment) varies in accordance with the activity, number of students involved, age of students and number of personnel involved.  Building principals shall provide for the protection of students and school personnel, and freedom from exposure to tort producing situations that arise from, but are not limited to:

    1. Incidents in lunchrooms or playgrounds (protection). Supervisors (100%)
    2. Incidents during school athletics. Coaches (15%)
    3. Incidents during physical education classes. Physical education teachers (15%)
    4. Incidents occurring during agriculture or home economics classes. Vocational teachers (15%)
    5. Incidents in connection with transportation, arriving at or departing from school.
    6. Incidents due to acts of fellow students—in or outside of classrooms. Regular classroom teachers (5%)
    7. Incidents due to lack or insufficiency of supervision: before school, after school, passing periods, noon hour or evening activities.

    It is expected that each building principal would expend approximately fifteen percent (15%) of his/her time meeting their responsibilities associated with Risk Care Management.

    Nurses (CSN, RN, LPN)
    A primary responsibility of school nurses is the protection of the health and safety of students and personnel.  This contractual position is directly involved with the District’s compliance to State Health Laws and ensuring that students have been physically examined in a manner that allows that the students is in a risk-free physical environment, both in relation to him/herself, and in relation to other students and district personnel.  The portion of her time devoted to limiting and/or avoiding tort situations is no less than fifty percent (50%).

    Food Services Director, Head Cooks, Café Workers
    The Food Services Director has the responsibility of supervising the protection of students from health problems due to contaminated supplies, improperly stored, cooked or handled food or milk.  She is also responsible for the protection of students and employees from harm due to improper or unsafe mechanical devices associated with the preparation and serving of the meals.  The anticipated portion of her time devoted to these important activities is no less than fifty percent (50%).  Head Cooks’ and Café Workers’ time commitment is ten percent (10%).

    Special Education Teachers, Special Education Cooperative
    The responsibility for providing Special Education Services are directly interwoven into the District’s Risk Management/Tort Avoidance Program.  The appropriate areas are as follows:

    1. The guarantee of protection of the constitutional and statutory rights of Special Education students.
    2. The reduction of exposure to tort situations involving the legal and proper student testing, evaluation, identification and placement of Special Education students.
    3. Ensuring the confidentiality of students with psychological profiles and records.
    4. The discipline of Special Education students.

    Due to the potential exposure to Tort producing possibilities associated with the instruction and supervision of Special Education students, it is expected that special education teachers are expected to spend fifteen percent (15%) of their time in this regard and fifty percent (50%) of costs associated with administration of the special education cooperative would be fulfilled through the Risk Management Program.

    Miscellaneous
    The responsibilities of playground supervisors for recess, before and after school supervision, bus monitors and cafeteria supervision are solely and completely within the realm of Risk Management functions.  One hundred percent (100%) of compensation associated with those assignments is covered through the program.

    APPROVED:  November 17, 2005

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    Article 480-E – Exhibit – Risk Care Management Review Certification Form

    Operational Services
    Exhibit – Risk Care Management Review Certification Form

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    Article 485 – Pandemic Preparedness

    Operational Services
    Pandemic Preparedness

    The School Board recognizes that the District will play an essential role along with the local health department and emergency management agencies in protecting the public’s health and safety if an influenza pandemic occurs. A pandemic influenza is a worldwide outbreak of a virus for which there is little or no natural immunity and no vaccine; it spreads quickly to people who have not been previously exposed to the new virus.
    To prepare the School District community for a pandemic, the Superintendent or designee shall: (1) learn and understand the roles that the federal, State, and local government would play in an epidemic; (2) form a pandemic planning team consisting of appropriate District personnel and community members to identify priorities and oversee the development and implementation of a comprehensive pandemic influenza school action plan; and (3) build awareness of the final plan among staff, students, and community.

    Emergency School Closing
    In the case of a pandemic, any decision for an emergency school closing will be made by the Superintendent in consultation with and, if necessary, at the direction of the District’s local health department, emergency management agencies, and Regional Office of Education.

    LEGAL REF.: 105 ILCS 5/10-16.7 and 5/10-20.5.
    115 ILCS 5/1 et seq.

    APPROVED: February 16, 2012

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    Article 485-AP1 – Administrative Procedure – School Action Steps for Pandemic Influenza

    Operational Services
    Administrative Procedure – School Action Steps for Pandemic Influenza

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    Article 485-AP2 – Administrative Procedure – Pandemic Influenza Surveillance and Reporting

    Operational Services
    Administrative Procedure – Pandemic Influenza Surveillance and Reporting

    During all levels of a pandemic flu outbreak, monitoring and documenting the number of students and faculty who are absent and report having influenza is critical.  Keeping track of these numbers helps health officials determine whether:  (1) the outbreak is increasing in scope, (2) to declare an epidemic and (3) to close schools.

    The following information assists officials to monitor illness rates and the potential for an epidemic:

    • Basic surveillance level definitions and response actions with instructions as outlined below.
    • Website links to reporting form(s) to submit to the local public health department.
    • Sample attendance log to document flu-related absences.
    Surveillance LevelsResponse Actions
    Standard Surveillance -
    Reported illnesses are within expected range.
    Monitor attendace for increased reports of absence due to flu-like illness.
    Do not report absences to the local health department.
    Heightened Surveillance -
    Reported illnesses exceed expected range.
    Monitor weekly attendance for flu-like illness/absences on Weekly Influenza Census.
    Begin morning flu check first hour of school; screen those who report positive for symptoms.
    Log absences due to flu-like illness on Daily Pandemic Influenza Census Log.
    Intensive Surveillance -
    Reported illnesses significantly exceed expected range.
    Monitor daily attendance and log absences on Daily Influenza Census or Daily Pandemic Influenza Log.
    Continue morning flu check.
    Send daily absence report to local health department upon request.
    Begin preparation for potential school closure.

    APPROVED: February 16, 2012