Article 600 – Educational Philosophy and Objectives

Instruction
Educational Philosophy and Objectives

The District’s educational program will seek to provide an opportunity for each student to develop to his or her maximum potential.  The objectives for the educational program are to:

  1. Foster students’ self-discovery, self-awareness, and self-discipline.
  2. Develop students’ awareness of and appreciation for cultural diversity.
  3. Stimulate students’ intellectual curiosity and growth.
  4. Provide students with fundamental career concepts and skills.
  5. Help students develop sensitivity to the needs and values of others and a respect for individual and group differences.
  6. Help each student strive for excellence and instill a desire to reach the limit of his or her potential.
  7. Encourage students to become life long learners.
  8. Provide an educational climate and culture free of bias concerning the protected classifications identified in policy 700.01, Equal Educational Opportunities.

In order for the Board to monitor whether the educational program is attaining these objectives and to be knowledgeable of current and future resource needs, the Superintendent shall prepare an annual report that includes:

  1. A review and evaluation of the present curriculum.
  2. A projection of curriculum and resource needs.
  3. An evaluation of, and plan to eliminate, any bias in the curriculum or instructional materials and methods concerning the classifications referred to in item 8, above.
  4. Any plan for new or revised instructional program implementation.
  5. A review of present and future facility needs.

POLICY APPROVED: March 16, 2006
POLICY AMENDED:  August 16, 2012

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Article 603 – School Accountability

Instruction
School Accountability

According to the Illinois General Assembly, the primary purpose of schooling is the transmission of knowledge and culture through which students learn in areas necessary to their continuing development and entry into the world of work. To fulfill that purpose, the State Board of Education prepared State Goals for Learning with accompanying Illinois Learning Standards.

The School Board gives priority in the allocation of resources, including funds, time, personnel, and facilities, to fulfilling this purpose.

Quality Assurance
The Board continuously monitors student achievement and the quality of the District’s work.  The Superintendent shall supervise the following quality assurance components, in accordance with State statute and State Board of Education rules, and continuously keep the Board informed:

  1. Prepare each school’s annual recognition application and quality assurance appraisal, whether internal or external, to assess each school’s continuous school improvement.
  2. If applicable, implement a No Child Left Behind Act plan, including the completion of the NCLB Consolidated Application, and seek Board approval where necessary or advisable.
  3. Continuously assess whether the District and its schools are making adequate yearly progress as defined by State law.
  4. If applicable, develop District and School Improvement Plans, present them for Board approval, submit them to the State Superintendent for verification, and supervise their implementation. If applicable, develop a restructuring plan for any school that remains on academic watch status after a fifth annual calculation.
  5. Prepare a school report card, present it at a regular Board meeting, and disseminate it as provided in State law.

School Choice for Students Enrolled in a School Identified for Improvement, Corrective Action, or Restructuring
This section applies to only those students enrolled in a school identified by the Board for school improvement, corrective action, or restructuring as defined by federal law. Those students may transfer to another public school within the District, if any, that has not been so identified. If there are no District schools available into which a student may transfer, the Superintendent or designee shall, to the extent practicable, establish a cooperative agreement with other districts in the area. A student who transfers to another school under this policy may remain at that school until the student completes the highest grade at that school. The District shall provide transportation only until the end of the school year in which the transferring school ceases to be identified for school improvement or subject to corrective action or restructuring. All transfers and notices provided to parents/guardians and transfer requests are governed by State and federal law.

Students from low-income families shall be provided supplemental educational services as provided in federal law if they attend any District school that:  (1) failed to make adequate yearly progress for 3 consecutive years, or (2) is subject to corrective action or restructuring.

LEGAL REF.: No Child Left Behind Act, §1116, 20 U.S.C. §6316.
34 C.F.R. §§200.32, 200.33, 200.42, and 200.43.
105 ILCS 5/2-3.25d, 5/2-3.63, 5/2-3.64, 5/10-21.3a, and 5/27-1.
23 Ill.Admin.Code Part 1, Subpart A: Recognition Requirements.

POLICY APPROVED: March 16, 2006
POLICY AMENDED:  January 17, 2013

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Article 605 – School Year Calendar and Day

Instruction
School Year Calendar and Day

School Calendar
The School Board, upon the Superintendent’s recommendation and subject to State regulations, annually establishes the dates for opening and closing classes, teacher institutes and in-services, the length and dates of vacations, and the days designated as legal school holidays. The school calendar shall have a minimum of 185 days to ensure 176 days of actual student attendance.

Commemorative Holidays
The teachers and students shall devote a portion of the school day on each commemorative holiday designated in The School Code to study and honor the commemorated person or occasion. The Board may, from time to time, designate a regular school day as a commemorative holiday.

School Day
The Board establishes the length of the school day with the recommendation of the Superintendent and subject to State law requirements.  The Superintendent or designee shall ensure that observances required by State law are followed during each day of school attendance.

LEGAL REF.:        105 ILCS 5/10-19, 5/10-24.46, 5/18-8.05, 5/18-12, 5/18-12.5, 5/24-2, 5/27-3, 5/27-18, 5/27-19, 5/27-20, 5/27-20.1, 5/27-20.2, and 20/1.
23 Ill.Admin.Code §1.420(f).
Metzl v. Leininger, 850 F.Supp. 740 (N.D. Ill., 1994), aff’d by 57 F.3d 618 (7th Cir., 1995).

POLICY APPROVED: March 16, 2006
POLICY AMENDED:    August 16, 2012

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Article 610 – Organization of Instruction

Instruction
Organization of Instruction

The School District has instructional levels for grades pre-kindergarten/ early childhood special education through twelve.  The Superintendent shall annually present to the School Board a plan for organizing instructional levels and assigning them to school facilities in order to:

  1. Support the District’s educational program,
  2. Maximize facility usage without undue overcrowding, and
  3. Provide substantially comparable instructional programs across the District.

Students, for instructional purposes, may be placed in groups within a school that do not necessarily follow grade level designations.  For purposes of attendance reporting and other records, however, each student is assigned a grade-level placement.

Kindergarten
The District maintains a full-day kindergarten with an instructional program that fulfills the District’s curriculum goals and objectives and the requirements of the State law.  The District also offers a half-day kindergarten for those parents/guardians who request a half-day program.

LEGAL REF.: 105 ILCS 5/10-20.19a, 5/10-20.37, and 5/10-22.18.
23 Ill.Admin.Code §1.420.

POLICY APPROVED: March 16, 2006
POLICY AMENDED:  August 16, 2012

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Article 614 – Class Size Policy

Instruction
Class Size Policy

The Board of Education will maintain class sizes throughout the District in an effort to achieve optimal instruction, given a number of factors, including but not limited to the needs of students, teacher qualifications, available space, budgetary constraints, balance among like attendance centers, and the current Collective Bargaining Agreement. The Board of Education may increase or cap class enrollments, and transfer students from building to building as necessary and appropriate.

POLICY ADOPTED: June 21, 1999
POLICY AMENDED: November 15, 2012

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Article 620 – Curriculum Development

Instruction
Curriculum Development

Adoption
The Superintendent shall recommend a comprehensive curriculum that is aligned with:

  1. The District’s educational philosophy and goals,
  2. Student needs as identified by research, demographics, and student achievement and other data,
  3. The knowledge, skills, and abilities required for students to become life-long learners,
  4. The minimum requirements of State and federal law and regulations for curriculum and graduation requirements,
  5. The curriculum of non-District schools that feed into or from a District school, provided that the necessary cooperation and information is available,
  6. The Illinois State Learning Standards and any District learning standards, and
  7. Any required State or federal student testing.

The School Board will adopt, upon recommendation of the Superintendent, a curriculum that meets the above criteria.

Experimental Educational Programs and Pilot Projects
The Superintendent may recommend experimental educational programs and/or pilot projects for Board consideration.  Proposals must include goals, material needs, anticipated expenses, and an evaluation process.  The Superintendent shall submit to the Board periodic progress reports for programs that exceed one year in duration and a final evaluation with recommendation upon the program’s completion.

Single-Gender Classes and Activities
The Superintendent may recommend a program of nonvocational single-gender classes and/or activities to provide diverse educational opportunities and/or meet students’ identified educational needs.  Participation in the classes or activities must be voluntary, both genders must be treated with substantial equality, and the program must otherwise comply with State and federal law and with Board policy 700.01, Equal Educational Opportunities.  The Superintendent must periodically evaluate any single-gender class or activity to ensure that:  (1) it does not rely on overly broad generalizations about the different talents, capabilities, or preferences of either gender, and (2) it continues to comply with State and federal law and with Board policy 700.01, Equal Educational Opportunities.

Development
The Superintendent shall develop a curriculum review program to monitor the current curriculum and promptly suggest changes to make the curriculum more effective, to take advantage of improved teaching methods and materials, and to be responsive to social change, technological developments, student needs, and community expectations.

The curriculum review program shall:

  1. Regularly evaluate the curriculum and instructional program.
  2. Ensure the curriculum continues to meet the stated adoption criteria.
  3. Include input from a cross-section of teachers, administrators, parents/guardians, and students, representing all schools, grade levels, disciplines, and specialized and alternative programs.
  4. Coordinate with the process for evaluating the instructional program and materials.

Curriculum Guides and Course Outlines
The Superintendent shall develop and provide subject area curriculum guides to appropriate staff members.

LEGAL REF.:        34 C.F.R. Part 106.
105 ILCS 5/10-20.8 and 5/10-19.

POLICY APPROVED: March 16, 2006
POLICY AMENDED:  August 16, 2012

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Article 620-AP – Administrative Procedure – Curriculum Development

Instruction
Administrative Procedure – Curriculum Development

Faculty Curriculum Committee
The Faculty Curriculum Committee assists in the District’s curriculum planning process and provides the Superintendent with recommendations and supportive summaries.  The Committee shall serve in an advisory capacity only.

The Faculty Curriculum Committee will:

  1. Engage in two-way communication with teachers in order to address questions and concerns, keep everyone informed, and cooperatively strive for continuous improvement.
  2. Provide system‑wide coordination of curriculum and student learning experiences.
  3. Identify and categorize problems related to curriculum.
  4. Research instructional methods and curriculum, utilizing available resources.
  5. Engage in long-range planning for the continuous improvement of the curriculum.

The Superintendent or designee appoints Committee members and directs the Committee providing specific tasks and time-frames.

Curriculum Guides and Course Outlines
Development of guides:

  1. Curriculum guides are best developed by the staff and teachers who are to use them.
  2. When entire staff participation is not feasible, the Superintendent or designee will direct staff representatives and/or relevant department heads to study, create, and revise the guides.
  3. Completed guides will be given to the Superintendent.

Use of guides:

  1. Curriculum guides serve as a framework from which a teacher will develop units of study, individual lesson plans, and approaches to instruction that will serve the students’ particular needs at a particular time. The guides shall be used to map the logical sequence of instruction.
  2. In subjects where sequence is important, such as mathematics, teachers shall be expected to adhere to the guide. In subjects where sequential learning is less important, the teacher may be given a greater degree of freedom in respect to sequence.
  3. In all cases, sufficient latitude shall be permitted to provide the teacher with time to teach the current, topical, and incidental issues that add to motivation and meaningful teaching and learning.
  4. The Building Principal and/or department heads shall see that optimum use is made of available curriculum guides.

 

POLICY APPROVED: August 16, 2012

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Article 620.01 – Curriculum Council

Instruction
Curriculum Council

The Curriculum Council is assembled to advise the superintendent in all matters related to PK-12 curriculum.  The by-laws of the Curriculum Council are below.

Article I:  Name

The committee shall be called the Prairie Central Curriculum Council

Article II:  Purpose

The Prairie Central Curriculum Council purposes shall be as follows:

  1. To provide for adequate and continual collaboration and communication on all matters related to PK-12 curriculum and instruction.
  2. To provide for District-wide coordination and articulation of curriculum related to programs of instruction and student learning experiences.
  3. To identify and categorize problems related to curriculum and instruction, and to establish priorities with respect to academic areas.
  4. To review studies and research in the areas of curriculum and instruction, utilizing all the resources available to the school system, and use such to educate the faculty, board and community.
  5. To make recommendations to the superintendent and Board of Education on the basis of study and research. Areas of responsibility shall include, but not be limited to:
    1. School improvement planning
    2. Curricular changes
    3. Textbook adoption
    4. Technology and software adoption
    5. Staff development planning
  6. To engage in long-range planning aimed at the continuous improvement of education in the Prairie Central Community Unit School District #8.

Article III:  Meetings

The Prairie Central Curriculum Council shall meet four (4) times per year during the school term.

Article IV:  Membership

  1. The Prairie Central Curriculum Council shall be composed of the following:
    1. All grade and department chairs.
    2. The curriculum coordinator.
    3. One (1) parent representative.
    4. Two (2) representatives from the Board of Education.
    5. The superintendent, technology coordinator, software coach, and sitting PCEA president shall be ex-officio members of the council.
    6. Although they may not vote, other members of the administrative and teacher staff are welcome to be present at meetings as observers.
  2. The committee shall select the Council chair and Council vice-chair from the grade and department chair membership for one (1)-year terms, with the Council vice-chair becoming Council chair following the chair’s term of office.
  3. The curriculum coordinator shall serve as secretary.
  4. Selection of members:
    1. Department and grade chairs are automatically appointed to the Council for the duration of their terms.
    2. The Board of Education representatives shall be selected by the Board.
    3. The parent representative shall be selected by the Council.
  5. New members shall be named in April and begin service in September.

Article V:  Term of Office

  1. Terms on the Council are defined below.
    1. Department/grade chairs, curriculum coordinator:             While holding position
    2. Technology coordinator, software coach, superintendent, PCEA president: While holding position
    3. Parent member, Board members:             One (1)-year term
  2. With the exception of grade/department chair members, unexpired terms shall be appointed by the Council chair.

Article VI:  Amendments and Recommendations

Amendments and recommendations:

  1. May be proposed by any member of the Council in written form.
  2. Shall be ratified no sooner than the next meeting of the Council.
  3. Shall be ratified by a two-thirds majority of the Council members, provided a quorum is present.
  4. Once ratification is attained, the topic shall not be revisited for one (1) year.
  5. May be accepted by the superintendent.
  6. May be accepted by Prairie Central Board of Education.

By-laws:

  1. The Council chair may call additional meetings during the school term.
  2. A majority of the membership must be present to vote on any Council business.
  3. The secretary shall be responsible for sharing the proceeds of the meeting with not only the affected parties, but the professional staff as a whole.

POLICY APPROVED: March 16, 2006
POLICY AMENDED:  August 16, 2012
POLICY AMENDED:  August 18, 2016

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Article 623 – Access to Electronic Networks

Instruction
Access to Electronic Networks

Electronic networks, including the Internet, are a part of the District’s instructional program and serve to promote educational excellence by facilitating resource sharing, innovation, and communication.  The Superintendent shall develop an implementation plan for this policy and appoint system administrator(s).

The School District is not responsible for any information that may be lost or damaged, or become unavailable when using the network, or for any information that is retrieved or transmitted via the Internet.  Furthermore, the District will not be responsible for any unauthorized charges or fees resulting from access to the Internet.

Curriculum and Appropriate Online Behavior
The use of the District’s electronic networks shall: (1) be consistent with the curriculum adopted by the District as well as the varied instructional needs, learning styles, abilities, and developmental levels of the students, and (2) comply with the selection criteria for instructional materials and library resource center materials. As required by federal law and Board policy 626, Curriculum Content, students will be educated about appropriate online behavior, including but not limited to: (1) interacting with other individuals on social networking websites and in chat rooms, and (2) cyber-bullying awareness and response. Staff members may, consistent with the Superintendent’s implementation plan, use the Internet throughout the curriculum.

The District’s electronic network is part of the curriculum and is not a public forum for general use.

Acceptable Use
All use of the District’s electronic networks must be: (1) in support of education and/or research, and be in furtherance of the goals stated herein, or (2) for a legitimate school business purpose. Use is a privilege, not a right. Students and staff members have no expectation of privacy in any material that is stored, transmitted, or received via the District’s electronic networks or District computers. General rules for behavior and communications apply when using electronic networks. The District’s Authorization for Electronic Network Access contains the appropriate uses, ethics, and protocol.  Electronic communications and downloaded material, including files deleted from a user’s account but not erased, may be monitored or read by school officials.

Internet Safety
Technology protection measures shall be used on each District computer with Internet access. They shall include a filtering device that protects against Internet access by both adults and minors to visual depictions that are: (1) obscene, (2) pornographic, or (3) harmful or inappropriate for students, as defined by federal law and as determined by the Superintendent or designee. The Superintendent or designee shall enforce the use of such filtering devices. An administrator, supervisor, or other authorized person may disable the filtering device for bona fide research or other lawful purpose, provided the person receives prior permission from the Superintendent or system administrator. The Superintendent or designee shall include measures in this policy’s implementation plan to address the following:

  1. Ensure staff supervision of student access to online electronic networks,
  2. Restrict student access to inappropriate matter as well as restricting access to harmful materials,
  3. Ensure student and staff privacy, safety, and security when using electronic communications,
  4. Restrict unauthorized access, including “hacking” and other unlawful activities, and
  5. Restrict unauthorized disclosure, use, and dissemination of personal identification information, such as, names and addresses.

Authorization for Electronic Network Access
Each staff member must sign the District’s authorization for electronic network access as a condition for using the District’s electronic network. Each student and his or her parent(s)/guardian(s) must sign the authorization before being granted unsupervised use.

All users of the District’s computers to access the Internet shall maintain the confidentiality of student records. Reasonable measures to protect against unreasonable access shall be taken before confidential student information is loaded onto the network.

The failure of any student or staff member to follow the terms of the authorization for electronic network access, or this policy, will result in the loss of privileges, disciplinary action, and/or appropriate legal action.

LEGAL REF.:        No Child Left Behind Act, 20 U.S.C. §6777.
Children’s Internet Protection Act, 47 U.S.C. §254(h) and (l).
Enhancing Education Through Technology Act, 20 U.S.C §6751 et seq.
47 C.F.R. Part 54, Subpart F, Universal Service Support for Schools and Libraries.
720 ILCS 135/0.01.

APPROVED: February 21, 2008
AMENDED:  August 16, 2012

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Article 623-AP – Administrative Procedure – Web Publishing Guidelines

Instruction
Administrative Procedure – Web Publishing Guidelines

General Requirements
All material published on the District’s website must have educational value and/or support the District guidelines, goals, and policies.  Material appropriate for web publishing includes information about the District and its School Board members, agendas, policies, appropriate administrative procedures, Department activities or services, schools, teachers or classes, student projects, and student extracurricular organizations. Personal information, not related to education, will not be allowed on the District’s website.

The District technology coordinator shall implement a centralized process for review and uploading of material onto the District’s website to ensure that, before material is published, it complies with District policy and procedures. The District technology coordinator shall supervise the efforts of all staff members responsible for web publishing at each level of District web publishing and, when appropriate, hold in-serve opportunities for those staff members.  The staff members responsible for web publishing are identified in these procedures in the section Different Levels of Web Publication.  The District technology coordinator shall provide regular feedback and suggestions to the Superintendent regarding these Guidelines.

All content published on the District’s website must:

  1. Comply with all State and federal law concerning copyright, intellectual property rights, and legal uses of network computers.
  2. Comply with Board policies, administrative procedures, these Guidelines, and other District guidelines provided for specific levels of publishing.
  3. Be limited in size. Due to limited storage space and varying network speeds, file sizes must be approved by the District technology coordinator.
  4. Comply with the publishing expectations listed below.

Material that fails to meet these Guidelines or is in violation of Board policy and/or procedures shall not be published on the District’s website.  The District reserves the right to remove any material in violation of its policy or procedures.  Failure to follow these Guidelines or Board policy and/or procedures may result in loss of privileges, disciplinary action, and/or appropriate legal action.

Publishing Expectations
The following are minimum expectations for all District web pages:

  1. The style and presentation of web published material should be of high quality and designed for clarity and readability. Material shall not be published in violation of the District’s procedures on Acceptable Use of Electronic Networks, including material that is defamatory, abusive, obscene, profane, sexually oriented, threatening, racially offensive, or harassing or material that invades the privacy of any individual.  Anonymous messages are prohibited.
  2. Correct grammar and spelling are expected.
  3. All information must be verifiable.
  4. Publications must include a statement of copyright when appropriate and indicate that permission has been secured when including copyrighted materials.
  5. Publications must identify affiliation with the District, school, and/or department.
  6. Widespread use of external links to non-District websites is discouraged, but if used, the external sites must contain appropriate educational materials and information as exclusively determined by the District. Every effort should be made to insure that all links are operational. Every link to an external website must open a new browser window.
  7. Relevant dates are required on all publications, including the date on which the publication was placed on the District’s website. Each site should contain the date the page was last updated.
  8. All publications must include the District email address of the staff member responsible for the page. This provides a contact person for questions or comments.  If a student is the publisher, the sponsoring staff member’s email must be included as the responsible person. Only District staff members may act as student sponsors.
  9. Use of the District’s website for personal or financial gain is prohibited. No commercial or private accounts should be listed on any District web pages.
  10. All documents should be previewed on different web browsers, especially Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, or Microsoft Internet Explorer, before being posted on the District’s website.

For more information about these expectations or other issues related to web publishing, please contact the System Administrator.

Protecting Student and Staff Privacy
Personal information concerning students or staff members, including home addresses and telephone numbers, shall not be published on District web pages.

A student’s last name, last name initial, and grade-level shall not be published on District web pages.  In addition, student records shall not be disclosed. In warranted), the sponsoring staff member should contact the Building Principal who may seek permission from the student’s parents/guardians.  Web pages shall not display student pictures with a student identified by his or her name unless written parental permission was first granted (e.g., by executing the form Using a Photograph or Videotape of a Student). Student email addresses, whether a personal or District account, shall not be listed on any District web page.

Submitting Material to Be Published
Everyone submitting material for publication on the District’s website shall have signed an Authorization for Electronic Network Access.  Before material is published on the District’s website, the author must authorize the District in writing to publish the material, unless the District owns the copyright.  All material submitted by a teacher or other staff member for publication on the District’s website is deemed “work for hire,” and the copyright in those works vests in the District. All material submitted for the District’s website is subject to treatment as a District-sponsored publication.

Different Levels of Web Publication
The following guidelines provide specific information regarding web publishing at different levels within the District. At each level, a staff member is identified as being responsible for web publishing at that level.  This individual’s web publishing efforts are supervised by the District technology coordinator.

District-Level
The District technology coordinator conducts the District-level web publishing efforts and supervises other levels of web publishing.  District-level publishing includes the District’s homepage as well as any publishing activities representing the District as a whole, e.g., information about Board meetings, Board policy, and schedules.

Department-Level
District departments (e.g., Transportation, Personnel, or Curriculum) may publish their own web pages as part of the District’s website.  The department is ultimately responsible for the department’s web pages, but may appoint a staff member as the department’s webmaster to fulfill the maintenance, reviewing, and uploading tasks.  The department shall keep the District technology coordinator informed of who is the department webmaster.

The web-published material should coincide with that department’s printed material.  The District technology coordinator should be consulted before publishing potentially sensitive material, e.g., school comparisons or student data.

The department front pages should maintain the look and feel of the District homepage – the connection to the District should be obvious.  Links to the main website’s “home” must be included at the bottom of main pages, and the District’s logo must be included at the top of main front pages of each department.

School-Level
The building principal is ultimately responsible for his or her respective school’s webpages, but may appoint a staff member as the school webmaster to fulfill the maintenance, reviewing, and uploading tasks.  The building principal shall keep the District technology coordinator informed of who is the school webmaster.  All official material originating from the school will be consistent with the District style and content guidelines.  The building principal or school webmaster may develop guidelines for the various sections of and contributors to the school’s web pages.

Staff-Level
Any teacher or other staff member wanting to create web pages for use in class activities or to provide a resource for other teachers or staff members shall notify the school webmaster of his or her desired publishing activities.

Student/Personal-Level
Student and personal web pages are not allowed on the School District’s web server, without the approval of a staff members, building principal, technology coordinator, and superintendent.

POLICY APPROVED: November, 2001
POLICY AMENDED:  April 18, 2013

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Article 623.03 – Teaching About Religions

Instruction
Teaching About Religions

The School District’s curriculum may include the study of religions as they relate to geography, history, culture, and the development of various ethnic groups. The study of religions shall give neither preferential nor derogatory treatment to any single religious belief or to religion in general. The study of religions shall be treated as an academic subject with no emphasis on the advancement or practice of religion.

LEGAL REF.: School Dist. of Abington Twp v. Schempp, 374 U.S. 203 (1963).
Allegheny County v. ACLU Pittsburgh Chapter, 492 U.S. 573, 109 S.Ct. 3086, 106 L.Ed.2d 472 (1989).

POLICY APPROVED: March 16, 2006

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Article 623.03-AP – Administrative Procedure – Teaching About Religions

Instruction
Administrative Procedure – Teaching About Religions

The following are guidelines for teaching about religions:

  1. Instruction must be age appropriate to ensure that students will not believe the District is sponsoring religion.
  2. Instruction may expose students to religious views, but may not impose any particular views.
  3. Instruction must be informational, not indoctrination.
  4. Instruction must be academic, not devotional.
  5. Instruction may study what people believe, but may not teach a student what to believe.
  6. Instruction should strive for student awareness of a variety of religions, but should not press for student acceptance of any one religion.

Within the parameters of the academic study of religion, teachers may display objects, artifacts, and symbols that illustrate a variety of religious customs, beliefs, and expressions.  Any classroom and school display presented as a part of religious studies or holiday activities must meet the following criteria:

  1. The display will be exhibited on a temporary basis.
  2. The display will be constructed in a manner that presents no endorsement, favoritism, or promotion of a single religion or religious belief.
  3. The display will include non-secular as well as secular symbols.
  4. The display will include appropriate descriptive labels attached to the symbols.

Individual student participation in the preparation of a religious study display or a religious holiday display is strictly voluntary.  If the display is a class activity, any student who wishes not to participate must be given an alternative assignment.

POLICY APPROVED: March 16, 2006

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Article 625.04 – Teaching About Controversial Issues

Instruction
Administrative Procedure – Teaching About Controversial Issues

The Superintendent shall ensure that all school-sponsored presentations and discussions of controversial or sensitive topics in the instructional program, including those made by guest speakers, are:

  • Age-appropriate. Proper decorum, considering the students’ ages, should be followed.
  • Consistent with the curriculum and serve an educational purpose.
  • Informative and present a balanced view.
  • Respectful of the rights and opinions of everyone. Emotional criticisms and hurtful sarcasm should be avoided.
  • Not tolerant of profanity or slander. Disruptive conduct is prohibited and may subject a student to discipline.

The District specifically reserves its right to stop any school-sponsored activity that it determines violates this policy, is harmful to the District or the students, or violates State or federal law.

POLICY APPROVED: March 16, 2006
POLICY AMENDED:  August 16, 2012

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Article 626 – Curriculum Content

Instruction
Curriculum Content

The curriculum shall contain instruction on subjects required by State statute or regulation as follows:

  1. In kindergarten through grade 8, subjects include: (a) language arts, (b) reading, (c) other communication skills, (d) science, (e) mathematics, (f) social studies, (g) art, (h) music, and (i) drug and substance abuse prevention. A reading opportunity of 60 minutes per day will be promoted for all students in kindergarten through grade 3 whose reading levels are one grade level or more lower than their current grade level.
  2. In grades 9 through 12, subjects include: (a) language arts, (b) writing intensive course, (c) science, (d) mathematics, (e) social studies including U.S. history, (f) foreign language, (g) music, (h) art, (i) driver and safety education , and (j) vocational education.

Students otherwise eligible to take a driver education course must receive a passing grade in at least 8 courses during the previous 2 semesters before enrolling in the course. The Superintendent or designee may waive this requirement if he or she believes a waiver to be in the student’s best interest. The course shall include classroom instruction on distracted driving as a major traffic safety issue. Automobile safety instruction covering traffic regulations and highway safety must include instruction on the consequences of alcohol consumption and the operation of a motor vehicle. The eligibility requirements contained in State law for the receipt of a certificate of completion from the Secretary of State shall be provided to students in writing at the time of their registration.

  1. In grades 7 through 12, as well as in interscholastic athletic programs, steroid abuse prevention must be taught.
  2. In kindergarten through grade 12, provided it can be funded by private grants or the federal government, violence prevention and conflict resolution must be stressed, including: (a) causes of conflict, (b) consequences of violent behavior, (c) non-violent resolution, and (d) relationships between drugs, alcohol, and violence.
  3. In grades kindergarten through 12, age-appropriate Internet safety must be taught, the scope of which shall be determined by the Superintendent or designee. The curriculum must incorporate policy 623, Access to Electronic Networks and, at a minimum, include: (a) education about appropriate online behavior, (b) interacting with other individuals on social networking websites and in chat rooms, and (c) cyberbullying awareness and response.
  4. In all grades, character education must be taught including respect, responsibility, fairness, caring, trustworthiness, and citizenship in order to raise students’ honesty, kindness, justice, discipline, respect for others, and moral courage.
  5. In all schools, citizenship values must be taught, including: (a) patriotism, (b) democratic principles of freedom, justice, and equality, (c) proper use and display of the American flag, (d) the Pledge of Allegiance, and (e) the voting process.
  6. In all grades, physical education must be taught including a developmentally planned and sequential curriculum that fosters the development of movement skills, enhances health-related fitness, increases students’ knowledge, offers direct opportunities to learn how to work cooperatively in a group setting, and encourages healthy habits and attitudes for a healthy lifestyle. Unless otherwise exempted, all students are required to engage daily during the school day in a physical education course. For exemptions and substitutions, see Policies entitled, Credit for Alternative Courses and Programs, and Course Substitution, and Exemption from Physical Activity.
  7. In all schools, health education must be stressed, including: (a) proper nutrition, (b) physical fitness, (c) components necessary to develop a sound mind in a healthy body, and (d) dangers and avoidance of abduction. The Superintendent shall implement a comprehensive health education program in accordance with State law.
  8. In all schools, career/vocational education must be taught, including: (a) the importance of work, (b) the development of basic skills to enter the world of work and/or continue formal education, (c) good work habits and values, (d) the relationship between learning and work, and (e) if possible, a student work program that provides the student with work experience as an extension of the regular classroom. A career awareness and exploration program must be available at all grade levels.
  9. In grades 9 through 12, consumer education must be taught, including: financial literacy; installment purchasing; budgeting, savings, and investing; banking; simple contracts; income taxes; personal insurance policies; the comparison of prices; homeownership; and the roles of consumers interacting with agriculture, business, labor unions, and government in formulating and achieving the goals of the mixed free enterprise system.
  10. In all schools, conservation of natural resources must be taught, including: (a) home ecology, (b) endangered species, (c) threats to the environment, and (d) the importance of the environment to life as we know it.
  11. In all schools, United States history must be taught, including: (a) the principles of representative government, (b) the Constitutions of the U.S. and Illinois, (c) the role of the U.S. in world affairs, (d) the role of labor unions, and (e) the role and contributions of ethnic groups, including but not limited to, the African Americans, Albanians, Asian Americans, Bohemians, Czechs, French, Germans, Hispanics (including the events related to the forceful removal and illegal deportation of Mexican-American U.S. citizens during the Great Depression), Hungarians, Irish, Italians, Lithuanians, Polish, Russians, Scots, and Slovakians in the history of this country and State.

In addition, all schools shall hold an educational program on the United States Constitution on Constitution Day, each September 17, commemorating the September 17, 1787 signing of the Constitution. However, when September 17 falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or holiday, Constitution Day shall be held during the preceding or following week.

  1. In grade 7 and all high school courses concerning S. history or a combination of U.S. history and American government, students must view a Congressional Medal of Honor film made by the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation, provided there is no cost for the film.
  2. In all schools, the curriculum includes a unit of instruction on the Holocaust and crimes of genocide, including Nazi atrocities of 1933-1945, Armenian Genocide, the Famine-Genocide in Ukraine, and more recent atrocities in Cambodia, Bosnia, Rwanda, and Sudan.
  3. In all schools, the curriculum includes a unit of instruction on the history, struggles, and contributions of women.
  4. In all schools, the curriculum includes a unit of instruction on Black History, including the history of the African slave trade, slavery in America, and the vestiges of slavery in this country, as well as the struggles and contributions of African-Americans.
  5. In all schools offering a secondary agricultural education program, the curriculum includes courses as required by 105 ILCS 5/2-3.80.
  6. In all schools, instruction during courses as determined by the Superintendent or designee on disability history, awareness, and the disability rights movement.

LEGAL REF.: 5 ILCS 465/3 and 465/3a.
20 ILCS 2605/2605-480.
105 ILCS 5/2-3.80(e) and (f), 5/27-3, 5/27-3.5, 5/27-5, 5/27-6, 5/27-7, 5/27-12, 5/27-12.1, 5/27-13.1, 5/27-13.2, 5/27-20.3, 5/27-20.4, 5/27-20.5, 5/27-21, 5/27-22, 5/27-23, 5/27-23.3, 5/27-23.4, 5/27-23.7, 5/27-23.8, 5/27-24.2, 435/, and 110/3.
625 ILCS 5/6-408.5.
23 Ill.Admin.Code §§1.420, 1.430, and 1.440.
Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2005, Pub. L. No. 108-447, Section 111 of Division J.
Protecting Children in the 21st Century Act, Pub.  L. No. 110-385, Title II, 122 stat. 4096 (2008).
47 C.F.R. §54.520.

POLICY APPROVED: March 16, 2006
POLICY AMENDED:  August 16, 2012

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Article 626-AP – Administrative Procedure – Comprehensive Health Education Program

Instruction
Administrative Procedure – Comprehensive Health Education Program

The major educational areas of the District’s comprehensive health education program are described below:

  1. In all elementary and secondary schools the health program shall include human ecology and health; human growth and development; the emotional, psychological, physiological, hygienic, and social responsibilities of family life (including sexual abstinence until marriage); prevention and control of disease, and course material and instruction to advise students of the Abandoned Newborn Infant Protection Act. The program shall include information about cancer, including without limitation, types of cancer, signs and symptoms, risk factors, the importance of early prevention and detection, and information on where to go for help.
  2. The grades 6-12 health program shall include the prevention, transmission and spread of AIDS; public and environmental health; consumer health; safety education and disaster survival; mental health and illness; personal health habits; alcohol and drug use and abuse (including the medical and legal ramifications of alcohol, drug, and tobacco use and abuse during pregnancy); sexual abstinence until marriage; tobacco; nutrition; and dental health. Secondary schools shall include sexual assault awareness.
  3. The following areas may also be included as in the curricula: basic first aid (including cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the Heimlich maneuver); heart disease; diabetes; stroke; the prevention of child abuse, neglect, and suicide; and teen dating violence in grades 8 through 12.
  4. In grades 5-12, the health program shall include instruction on alcohol and drug use and abuse, including the consequences of drug and substance abuse.
  5. In grades K-8, students should be provided with age-appropriate information about the dangers of drug abuse. The District’s educational program shall offer drug education units that are integrated into the curricula and are designed to promote effective methods for the prevention and avoidance of drug and substance abuse.
  6. In grades 7-12, the program shall include the prevention of abuse of anabolic steroids. In addition, coaches and sponsors of interscholastic athletic programs shall provide instruction on steroid abuse prevention to students participating in these programs.
  7. The family life and sex education program shall be developed in a sequential pattern and related in depth and scope to the students’ physical, emotional, and intellectual maturity level. Family life courses offered in grades 6-12, shall include information regarding the alternatives to abortion and information regarding the prevention, transmission, and spread of AIDS. Course content shall be age-appropriate.

Class sessions which deal exclusively with human sexuality may be conducted separately for males and females.

  1. The health program in grades K-8 shall include annual instruction on the danger of and how to avoid abduction as part of the District’s regular curriculum. Students shall be given, as appropriate, information on child sexual abuse.
  2. Students shall be provided parenting education in grades 6-12.
  3. Students shall be provided safety education in all grades.
  4. All students shall receive age-appropriate instruction on motor vehicle safety and litter control.
  5. Students in grades 9 or 10 shall receive instruction on donations and transplants of organs/tissue and blood.

No student shall be required to take or participate in any class or course on AIDS, family life instruction, sex abuse, or organ/tissue transplantation, if his or her parent/guardian submits a written objection to the Building Principal. Parents/guardians of students in grades kindergarten through 8 shall be given at least 5 days written notice before instruction on avoiding sex abuse begins. Refusal to take or participate in any such course or program shall not be reason for disciplinary action or academic penalty.

Parents/guardians shall be provided the opportunity to preview all print and non-print materials used for instructional purposes.

LEGAL REF.: 105 ILCS 5/27-9.1, 5/27-9.2, 5/27-13.2, 5/27-17, 5/27-23, 5/27-23.1, 5/27-23.3, 5/27-23.5, 5/27-26, and 110/3.

POLICY APPROVED: March 16, 2006
POLICY AMENDED:  August 16, 2012

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Article 626-E – Exhibit – Notice to Parents or Guardians of Students Enrolled in Family Life and Sex Education Classes

Instruction
Exhibit – Notice to Parents or Guardians of Students Enrolled in Family Life and Sex Education Classes

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Article 626.01 – School Wellness

Instruction
School Wellness

Student wellness, including good nutrition and physical activity, shall be promoted in the District’s educational program, school activities, and meal programs. This policy shall be interpreted consistently with Section 204 of the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004.

Goals for Nutrition Education and Nutrition Promotion
The goals for addressing nutrition education and nutrition promotion include the following:

  • Schools will support and promote good nutrition for students.
  • Schools will foster the positive relationship between good nutrition, physical activity, and the capacity of students to develop and learn.
  • Nutrition education will be part of the District’s comprehensive health education curriculum.

Goals for Physical Activity
The goals for addressing physical activity include the following:

  • Schools will support and promote an active lifestyle for students.
  • Physical education will be taught in all grades and shall include a developmentally planned and sequential curriculum that fosters the development of movement skills, enhances health-related fitness, increases students’ knowledge, offers direct opportunities to learn how to work cooperatively in a group setting, and encourages healthy habits and attitudes for a healthy lifestyle.
  • During the school day, all students will be required to engage in a daily physical education course, unless otherwise exempted.
  • The curriculum will be consistent with and incorporate relevant Illinois Learning Standards for Physical Development and Health as established by the Illinois State Board of Education.

Nutrition Guidelines for Foods Available in Schools During the School Day
Students will be offered and schools will promote nutritious food and beverage choices consistent with the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans and Food Guidance System published jointly by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Agriculture. In addition, in order to promote student health and reduce childhood obesity, the Superintendent or designee shall  control food sales that compete with the District’s non-profit food service in compliance with the Child Nutrition Act. Food service rules shall restrict the sale of foods of minimal nutritional value, as defined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, in the food service areas during the meal periods and comply with all applicable rules of the Illinois State Board of Education.

Guidelines for Reimbursable School Meals
Reimbursable school meals served shall meet, at a minimum, the nutrition requirements and regulations for the National School Lunch Program and/or School Breakfast Program.

Monitoring
The Superintendent or designee shall provide periodic implementation data and/or reports to the Board concerning this policy’s implementation sufficient to allow the Board to monitor and adjust the policy.  This report must include without limitation each of the following:

  • An assessment of the District’s implementation of the policy
  • The extent to which schools in the District are in compliance with the policy
  • The extent to which the policy compares to model local school wellness policies
  • A description of the progress made in attaining the goals of the policy

Community Input
The Superintendent or designee will invite suggestions and comments concerning the development, implementation, and improvement of the school wellness policy from parents, students, representatives of the school food authority, teachers of physical education, school health professionals, the school board, school administrators, and community.

LEGAL REF.: Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004, PL 108-265, Sec. 204.
Child Nutrition Act of 1966, 42 U.S.C. §1771 et seq.
National School Lunch Act, 42 U.S.C. §1758.
Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, 42 U.S.C. §1758b, PL 111-296.
42 U.S.C. §1779, as implemented by 7 C.F.R. §210.11.
105 ILCS 5/2-3.139.
23 Ill.Admin.Code Part 305, Food Program.
ISBE’s “School Wellness Policy” Goal, adopted Oct. 2007.

POLICY ADOPTED:   February 17, 2004
POLICY AMENDED:  December 20, 2012

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Article 627 – Student Social and Emotional Development

Instruction
Student Social and Emotional Development

Student social and emotional development shall be incorporated in the District’s educational program and shall be consistent with the social and emotional development standards to be contained in the Illinois Learning Standards. The objectives for addressing the needs of students for social and emotional development through the educational programs are to:

  1. Enhance students’ school readiness, academic success, and use of good citizenship skills;
  2. Foster a safe, supportive learning environment where students feel respected and valued;
  3. Teach social and emotional skills to all students;
  4. Partner with families and the community to promote students’ social and emotional development; and
  5. Prevent or minimize mental health problems in students.

LEGAL REF.:  Children’s Mental Health Act of 2003, 405 ILCS 49/1 et seq.

POLICY APPROVED: March 16, 2006

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Article 628 – Using Animals in the Educational Program

Instruction
Using Animals in the Educational Program

Animals may be brought into school facilities for educational purposes according to procedures developed by the Superintendent assuring: (a) the animal is appropriately housed, humanely cared for, and properly handled, and (b) students will not be exposed to a dangerous animal or an unhealthy environment.
Experiments on living animals are prohibited; however, behavior studies that do not impair an animal’s health or safety are permissible. The dissection of dead animals or parts of dead animals shall be allowed in the classroom only when the dissection exercise contributes to or is a part of an illustration of pertinent study materials. All dissection of animals shall be confined to the classroom and must comply with The School Code.
Students who object to performing, participating in, or observing the dissection of animals are excused from classroom attendance without penalty during times when such activities are taking place. No student will be penalized or disciplined for refusing to perform, participate in, or observe a dissection. The Superintendent or designee shall inform students of: (1) their right to refrain from performing, participating in, or observing dissection, and (2) which courses contain a dissection unit and which of those courses offers an alternative project.

LEGAL REF.: 105 ILCS 5/2-3.122, 5/27-14, and 112/.

POLICY APPROVED: March 16, 2006
POLICY AMENDED: January 17, 2013

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Article 628-AP – Administrative Procedure – Dissection of Animals

Instruction
Administrative Procedure – Dissection of Animals
ActorActionTime
Building PrincipalIdentifies: (1) which, if any, courses contain a dissection project, and (2) the available alternative projects.
“Dissection” includes cutting, killing, preserving, or mounting of living or dead animals or animal parts for scientific study; it does not include the cutting, preserving, or mounting of: (1) meat or other animal products that have been processed for use as food or in the preparation of food, or (2) wool, silk, glue, or other commercial or artistic products derived from animals. 105 ILCS 112/10.
Students who object to performing, participating in, or observing a dissection must be excused from classroom attendance without penalty. 105 ILCS 112/.
Throughout the curriculum development process
Ensures that course descriptions indicate which courses contain a dissection unit. For such courses, indicates that objecting students have the right to refrain, and the availability, if any, of an alternative.Annually when course offerings and descriptions are distributed to students
Guidance Counselors and TeachersReminds objecting students to check the expectations and requirements of the post-secondary schools that they may be interested in attending. 105 ILCS 112/20(b).Whenever a student may choose between dissection and an alternative program
StudentsIf dissection is objectionable, asks the teacher to be excused from the dissection project and requests an alternative project.Within the first 10 days of the course, if possible
All Staff MembersDo not penalize or discriminate against a student in any way for refusing to perform, participate in, or observe dissection.Continuously

POLICY APPROVED: March 16, 2006
POLICY AMENDED: February 21, 2013

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Article 628-E – Exhibit – Guidelines and Application for Using Animals in School Facilities

Instruction
Administrative Procedure – Dissection of Animals

Article 629 – Programs for Students At-Risk of Academic Failure

Instruction
Programs for Students At-Risk of Academic Failure

The Superintendent or designee shall develop, maintain, and supervise a program for students at risk of academic failure or dropping out of school. The program shall include education and support services addressing individual learning styles, career development, and social needs, and may include without limitation one or more of the following:

  • Parent-teacher conferences
  • Counseling services by social workers and/or guidance counselors
  • Counseling services by psychologists
  • Psychological testing
  • Truants’ alternative and optional education program
  • Alternative school recommendation
  • Community agency services
  • Alternative learning opportunities program, in conformity with the Alternative Learning Opportunities Law, as it may be amended from time to time
  • Graduation incentives program
  • Remediation program

Any student who is below the age of 20 years is eligible to enroll in a graduation incentives program if he or she:

  1. Is considered a dropout according to State law;
  2. Has been suspended or expelled;
  3. Is pregnant or is a parent;
  4. Has been assessed as chemically dependent; or
  5. Is enrolled in a bilingual education or LEP program.

LEGAL REF.: 105 ILCS 5/2-3.41, 5/2-3.64, 5/2-3.66, 5/2-3.66b, 5/13B-1 et seq., 5/26-2a, 5/26-13, 5/26-14, and 5/26-16.
23 Ill.Admin.Code Part 210.

POLICY APPROVED: March 16, 2006
POLICY AMENDED:    August 16, 2012

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Article 630 – Education of Children With Disabilities

Instruction
Education of Children With Disabilities

The School District shall provide a free appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment and necessary related services to all children with disabilities enrolled in the District, as required by the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and implementing provisions of the School Code, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans With Disabilities Act. The term “children with disabilities,” as used in this policy, means children between ages 3 and 21 (inclusive) for whom it is determined, through definitions and procedures described in the Illinois State Board of Education’s Special Education rules, that special education services are needed.

It is the intent of the District to ensure that students who are disabled within the definition of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 are identified, evaluated, and provided with appropriate educational services. Students may be disabled within the meaning of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act even though they do not require services pursuant to the IDEA.

For students eligible for services under IDEA, the District shall follow procedures for identification, evaluation, placement, and delivery of services to children with disabilities provided in the Illinois State Board of Education’s Special Education rules. For those students who are not eligible for services under IDEA, but, because of disability as defined by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, need or are believed to need special instruction or related services, the District shall establish and implement a system of procedural safeguards. The safeguards shall cover students’ identification, evaluation, and educational placement. This system shall include notice, an opportunity for the student’s parent(s)/guardian(s) to examine relevant records, an impartial hearing with opportunity for participation by the student’s parent(s)/guardian(s), representation by counsel, and a review procedure.

The District may maintain membership in one or more cooperative associations of school districts that shall assist the District in fulfilling its obligations to the District’s disabled students.
If necessary, students may also be placed in nonpublic special education programs or education facilities.

LEGAL REF.: Americans With Disabilities Act, 42 U.S.C. §12101 et seq.
Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004, 20 U.S.C. §1400 et seq.
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Section 504, 29 U.S.C. §794.
105 ILCS 5/14-1.01 et seq., 5/14-7.02, and 5/14-7.02a.
23 Ill.Admin.Code Part 226.

POLICY APPROVED: April 20, 2006
POLICY AMENDED: August 16, 2012

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Article 630-AP1 – Administrative Procedure – Special Education Procedures Assuring the Implementation of Comprehensive Programming for Children with Disabilities

Instruction
Administrative Procedure – Special Education Procedures Assuring the Implementation of Comprehensive Programming for Children with Disabilities

In its continuing commitment to help school districts and special education cooperatives comply with ISBE requirements for procedure, the special education committee of the Ill. Council of School Attorneys prepared model special education procedures.  ISBE has approved these procedures as conforming to 23 Ill.Admin.Code §226.710.  This ISBE rule contains the requirements for special education procedures that must be adopted by each school district and cooperative entity. The IASB/ISBE model procedures are approximately 80 pages and are available on the IASB website: http://iasb.com/law/icsaspeced.cfm.

POLICY APPROVED: September 20, 2012

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Article 630-AP2 – Administrative Procedure – Access to Classrooms and Personnel

Instruction
Administrative Procedure – Access to Classrooms and Personnel

Access to classrooms and personnel is permitted in limited situations by Section 105 ILCS 5/14-8.02(g-5), amended by P.A. 96-657.  Guidelines follow:

  1. These guidelines apply to access requested by the parent/guardian of a student receiving special education services or being evaluated for eligibility, an independent educational evaluator, or a qualified professional retained by or on behalf of a parent/guardian or child. A qualified professional means “an individual who holds credentials to evaluate the child in the domain or domains for which an evaluation is sought or an intern working under the direct supervision of a qualified professional, including a master’s or doctoral degree candidate.” These individuals are referred to in this procedure as visitors.
  2. Visitors will be afforded reasonable access to educational facilities, personnel, classrooms, and buildings and to the child. To minimize disruption, reasonable access means that the parent(s)/guardian(s) or qualified professional retained by or on behalf of a parent/guardian or child is allowed access once per school quarter for up to one hour or one class period. A visitor may request the authorized administrator to grant longer or additional observations based on individual circumstances and provide any supporting documentation in support of such a request. A professional evaluator can request longer or additional observations in his or her initial request. The administrator may grant, deny, or modify the request, and the administrator’s decision shall be final.
  3. Visitors must comply with:
    1. School safety, security, and visitation policies at all times.
    2. Applicable privacy laws, including those laws protecting the confidentiality of education records such as the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act and the Illinois School Student Records Act.
    3. Board policy 830.02, Visitors to and Conduct on School Property. Visitors may not disrupt the educational process.
  4. If the visitor is a parent/guardian, he or she will be afforded reasonable access as described above for the purpose of:
    1. Observing his or her child in the child’s current educational placement, services, or program, or
    2. Visiting an educational placement or program proposed for the child by the IEP team.
  5. If the visitor is an independent educational evaluator or a qualified professional retained by or on behalf of a parent or child, he or she must be afforded reasonable access of sufficient duration and scope for the purpose of conducting an evaluation of the child, the child’s performance, the child’s current educational program, placement, services, or environment, or any educational program, placement, services, or environment proposed for the child, including interviews of educational personnel, child observations, assessments, tests, or assessments of the child’s educational program, services, or placement or of any educational program proposed by the IEP team, services, or placement. If one or more interviews of school personnel are part of the evaluation, the interviews must be conducted at a mutually agreed upon time, date, and place that do not interfere with the school employee’s school duties. The Building Principal or designee may limit interviews to personnel having information relevant to the child’s current educational services, program, or placement or to a proposed educational service, program, or placement.
  6. Prior to visiting a school, school building, or school facility, a visitor must complete 630-AP2, E1, Request to Access Classroom(s) or Personnel for Special Education Evaluation and/or Observation Purposes. This form serves to:
    1. Inform the Building Principal or designee in writing of the proposed visit(s), the purpose, and the duration, and
    2. Identify requested dates/times for the visit(s) to facilitate scheduling.
  7. The student’s parent/guardian must consent in writing to the student being interviewed by the named evaluator as part of a visit. The parent/guardian will grant this consent by completing 630-AP2, E1, Request to Access Classroom(s) or Personnel for Special Education Evaluation and/or Observation Purposes.
  8. The student’s parent/guardian, or the student, if he or she is over the age of 18, must execute an Authorization to Release Student Record Information before an independent educational evaluator or a qualified professional retained by or on behalf of a parent/guardian or child will be given access to student school records or to personnel who would likely release such records during discussions about the student. If a student is over the age of 12 and the records contain mental health and/or developmental disability information, the student must also be requested to sign the Authorization to Release information before any observation by or disclosure of school student records or information to a visitor.
  9. The visitor must acknowledge, before the visit, that he or she is obligated to honor students’ confidentiality rights and refrain from any re-disclosure of such records. The visitor will provide this acknowledgment and agreement by completing 630-AP2, E1, Request to Access Classroom(s) or Personnel for Special Education Evaluation and/or Observation Purposes.
  10. The Building Principal or designee will attempt to arrange the visit(s) at times that are mutually agreeable. The Building Principal or designee will accompany any visitor for the duration of the visit, including during any interviews of staff members.
  11. If the visitor is a professional retained by the parent/guardian, the visitor must provide identification and credentials before the visit.
  12. This procedure applies to any public school facility, building, or program and to any facility, building, or program supported in whole or in part by public funds. The student’s case manager or other District designee must facilitate such visit(s) when the student attends a program outside of the School District, such as at a private day program or residential program, provided it is supported in whole or in part by public funds.

POLICY APPROVED: September 20, 2012

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Article 630-AP3 – Administrative Procedure – Service Animals

Instruction
Administrative Procedure – Service Animals

State and federal law allow a student with a disability to be accompanied by a service animal that is individually trained to perform work or tasks for the benefit of a student. The animal may accompany the student to all school functions, whether in or outside the classroom. Use this procedure to identify and manage legal and practical issues when a student with a disability uses a service animal at school.

Definitions
Service Animal – A dog or any other animal that is individually trained to perform tasks for the benefit of a student with a disability according to State law (105 ILCS 5/14-6.02). Federal law defines as any dog that is individually trained to perform tasks or work for the benefit of a student with a disability (28 C.F.R. §§35.104 and 35.136). Federal law also explains that other species of animals, whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained, are not service animals.

Under federal law, disability includes a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability. The “work or tasks performed” must be directly related to the student’s disability. Examples of work or tasks include, but are not limited to assisting a student who is blind or has low vision with navigation and other tasks; alerting a student who is deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds; providing non-violent protection or rescue work; pulling a wheelchair; assisting a student during a seizure; alerting a student  to the presence of allergens; retrieving items such as medicine or the telephone; providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to a student with mobility disabilities; and helping a student with psychiatric and neurological disabilities by preventing or interrupting impulsive or destructive behaviors or performing other duties.

For more information about the definition of service animal, see the U.S. Dept. of Justice, Civil Rights Div., Disability Rights Section, document titled Service Animals at:

www.ada.gov/service_animals_2010.htm.

Handler – An individual who has and maintains control over the service animal. This individual may be the student using the service animal. Control of the service animal means using a harness, leash, or other tether, unless the handler is unable because of a disability to use one of these devices or their use would interfere with the service animal’s safe, effective performance of work or tasks. If or when these devices are not used, control of the service animal must be accomplished through voice control, signals, or other effective means.

ActorAction
Parent/GuardianInforms the School District of the need for a service animal to accompany their disabled child to school.

Cooperates with the District to successfully incorporate the service animal into the educational environment.
Superintendent or designeeDiscusses this procedure with the Building Principal, other appropriate administrative and special education staff, and the Board Attorney.

The Board Attorney will be a necessary participant in the District’s efforts to manage the issues presented by service animals being used in school facilities. The Superintendent may want to authorize the Building Principal to consult with the Board Attorney as needed for this issue.

Contacts the District’s insurance carrier(s) to assess appropriate coverage for issues involving service animals, including a handler.
Informs all Building Principals and Special Education Coordinators that any disabled student has the right to be accompanied by a service animal “that is individually trained to perform tasks or work for the benefit of a student” at any school facility or function.

105 ILCS 5/14-6.02 grants students with a disability the right to bring a service animal to school. Schools must modify their policies, practices, or procedures to permit the use of a service animal by a student with a disability (28 C.F.R. §35.136).

Discusses 63-AP3, E1, Guidelines for Service Animals in School Facilities, with building principals and instructs them to: (1) inform their individual building staff of these guidelines when service animals are present in their individual buildings, and (2) use this exhibit as an internal District document to ensure legitimate safety interests of staff and students. It may not be used as an agreement between the District and its students and their parents/guardians as a condition of the student using a service animal.
IEP and/or 504 TeamFor a student who is not already identified as disabled, follows the District’s evaluation procedures for determining whether a student is a student with a disability within the meaning of IDEA or Section 504. See Board policy 630, Education of Children with Disabilities.
If a student does not qualify as a student with a disability, consult the Board Attorney before excluding the service animal from the school. This will ensure that there are not special circumstances that require the school to allow access despite a student’s non-disabled status.
For a student with an IEP or Section 504 plan, or who qualifies for one, determines:

  1. 1. Whether the service animal is a required related service to ensure the provision of a “free appropriate public education” (FAPE), and/or

  2. 2. Whether the service animal is an appropriate reasonable accommodation for the student’s disability.



Permits the use of the service animal if the answer to either of the above questions is positive (i.e., determines that the service animal will perform tasks for the benefit of a student with a disability).
Informs the parent/guardian that the student’s service animal may accompany the student to school, and explain that the service animal must be under the control of its handler at all times and housebroken (28 C.F.R. 35.136).
If the school excludes the service animal:

  1. 1. Notifies the parent/guardian in writing of the reasons for the exclusion and the right to appeal. Provides any required procedural safeguard notices. See 23 Ill.Admin.Code Part 226; Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (34 C.F.R. Parts 104 and 300); and 630-AP1, E1, Notice to Parents/Guardians Regarding Section 504 Rights.

  2. 2. Gives the student with a disability the opportunity to participate in all of the school’s services, programs, or activities without having the service animal at the school facility.

Building PrincipleWhen notice of the need for a service animal in a school facility is provided:
Balances student’s need for the service animal and the legitimate safety interests of other students and staff by ensuring the service animal will meet the guidelines listed in 630-AP3, E1, Guidelines for Service Animals in School Facilities. Takes appropriate steps to inform the student’s parent/guardian of any unmet guidelines and what actions must be taken to meet these guidelines and avoid exclusion of the service animal.

Discusses 630-AP3, E1, Guidelines for Service Animals in School Facilities, with building staff. Requests to be immediately informed if the animal’s behavior does not conform to these guidelines.
Ensures that the District conducts a criminal background check on any handler(s) pursuant to policy on resource persons and volunteers.

The ADA regulation, 28 C.F.R. §§35.130(f) and 35.136(h), and the Illinois White Cane Act, 775 ILCS 30/, both prohibit charging a disabled individual a deposit or a surcharge as a condition to allowing a service animal to accompany the disabled individual. Consult the Board Attorney about payment of any criminal background screening fees for an adult handler.

Creates a plan with the student’s parent/guardian and the handler for:

  1. 1. Integrating the animal into the classroom and school environment (assemblies, cafeteria, library, etc.), and

  2. 2. Meeting the service animal’s basic needs during the school day.

  3. Any plan depends on the individual student’s service animal arrangement, any management issues, and the schedules within each individual building. The school staff is not required to provide care or assistance except in special circumstances (see 28 C.F.R. §35.136(e). Consider addressing: where the animal will relieve itself, who disposes of the waste, where the animal drinks water, and who provides it, etc. Note: While the school is not required to provide staff to take the animal outside, it may need to provide a staff member to accompany a student outside if the student is the animal’s handler (see 28 C.F.R. §35.130(b)(7).

    Checks with the school nurse regarding any known allergies among students attending the school.

    Manages identified students’ competing educational interests by:

    1. 1. Consulting the Board Attorney.

    2. 2. Minimizing contact between any allergic students and the service animal.

    3. 3. Creating a method to monitor identified competing educational interests between students based upon the individual facts of the situation.

    4. 4. Responding to future unidentified competing educational interests and managing them immediately.

    5. 5. Modifying any other conditions as the individual facts of the situation require.


    6. See Kalbfleisch ex rel. v. Columbia Community Unit School District, Ill.App.3d 1105, for a discussion about the balancing of interests. Other helpful publications include:

      • The U.S. Department of Education’s “Reasonable Accommodation Handbook,” Section C10, provides information about balancing competing interests in the context of a service animal’s presence in the work environment. It is available at:

      • The Ill. Attorney General Office’s “Disability Rights Service Animals: A Guide for Illinois Businesses and Other Public Accommodations,” available at:

      • The U.S. Dept. of Justice’s “Commonly Asked Questions about Service Animals in Places of Business,” available at:


      Facilitates the dissemination of accurate information about the presence of the service animal at school while respecting privacy rights.
      Considers creating a joint communication from the Building Principal and the parent/guardian of the student using a service animal. The communication should inform other students and their parents/guardians about the placement of a service animal in their educational setting.
      Providing a joint communication allows the school to exchange the information needed to balance competing educational interests without violating federal or State laws that govern student records. See Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), 20 U.S.C. §1232g, and its implementing rules at 34 C.F.R. Part 99; Ill. School Student Records Act, 105 ILCS 10/, and its implementing rules at 23 Ill.Admin.Code Part 375. FERPA prohibits schools from disclosing personally identifiable information from students’ education records without the consent of a parent or eligible student, unless an exception applies. See policy 735, Student Records.

      Prepares a list of answers to anticipated questions.
      Educates students, staff, and the community about the rights of students to use service animals in the school and the consequences for mistreatment of animals. See Humane Care of Animals Act (510 ILCS 70/4.03, 70/4.04, and 70/7.15 make it unlawful to meddle or tamper with a service dog or to tease, strike or mistreat one); White Cane Law (775 ILCS 30/3 makes it unlawful to interfere with the rights of a disabled person); Guide Dog Access Act (720 ILCS 630/1 makes it unlawful to deny right of entry and use of facilities of any public place of accommodation).
      Contacts the student’s parent/guardian if at any time the animal fails to meet the guidelines listed in 630-AP3, E1, Guidelines for Service Animals in School Facilities.

      When a service animal arrives at school without notice:
      Keeps the animal with the student if the service animal is obviously:

      1. 1. Able to perform tasks or work for the benefit of a student with a disability,

      2. 2. Able to stay under the control of its handler and, if not, the handler can take effective action to control it, and

      3. Housebroken.


      4. Informs staff that the animal may not be taken away from the student.
        Informs the parent/guardian of this procedure and requests their cooperation with the District to successfully incorporate the service animal into the educational environment.
        Excludes the animal and contacts the student’s parent/guardian if the animal does not obviously meet the conditions in 630-AP3, E1, Guidelines for Service Animals in School Facilities.
        Contacts animal control if the Principal or designee believes the animal is not properly vaccinated, licensed, may be dangerous, or is sick.

LEGAL REF.: 105 ILCS 5/14-6.02.
Humane Care for Animals Act, 510 ILCS 70/.
Guide Dog Access Act, 720 ILCS 630/.
Illinois White Cane Act, 775 ILCS 30/.
28 C.F.R. Part 35.
28 C.F.R. §36.104.
34 C.F.R. Parts 100 and 300.

POLICY APPROVED: September 20, 2012

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Article 630-AP3 – Administrative Procedure – Exhibit – Guidelines for Service Animals in School Facilities

Instruction
Administrative Procedure – Exhibit – Guidelines for Service Animals in School Facilities

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Article 630-AP4 – Administrative Procedure – Care of Students with Diabetes

Instruction
Administrative Procedure – Care of Students with Diabetes

The Ill. Council of School Attorneys prepared material for implementing the Care of Students with Diabetes Act (105 ILCS 145/, added by P.A. 96-1485). This material includes:

  1. Sample procedures for the care of students with diabetes
  2. Answers to FAQs on: process for selecting a delegated care aide; training; developing a diabetes care plan; classroom management; and sample authorization, release, and acknowledgement

The material is posted on the IASB website, iasb.com/law/diabmats.cfm.

School officials should periodically check the IASB website for updates to the material that are made in response to legislation or other developments.

POLICY APPROVED:  September 20, 2012

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Article 630-E1 – Exhibit – Notice to Parents/Guardians Regarding Section 504 Rights

Instruction
Exhibit – Notice to Parents/Guardians Regarding Section 504 Rights

On District letterhead

Date:

Dear Parent/Guardian:

Re:       Section 504 Rights

The Rehabilitation Act of 1973, commonly referred to as Section 504, is a nondiscrimination statute enacted by the U.S. Congress. The Act’s purpose is to: (1) protect the rights of individuals with disabilities in programs and activities that receive federal financial assistance from the U.S. Dept. of Education (ED), and (2) assure that disabled students have educational opportunities and benefits equal to those provided to non-disabled students.

An eligible student under Section 504 is a student who: has a record of having, or is regarded as having, a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits a major life activity as defined by 34 C.F.R. §104.3.

This notice describes the rights assured by Section 504 to those disabled students who do not qualify under IDEA. The intent of this notice is to keep you fully informed concerning decisions about your student and to inform you of your rights if you disagree with any decisions in reference to Section 504.

Please keep this explanation for future reference.

Parents/Guardians and/or students have the right to:

  1. Be informed by the School District of your rights and procedural safeguards under Section 504 in an understandable language. 34 C.F.R. Parts 104 and 300. The purpose of this notice is to advise parents/guardians and/or students of these rights. 23 Ill.Admin.Code §§226.500, 510 and 610.
  2. An appropriate education designed to meet a student’s individual educational needs as adequately as the needs of non-disabled students are met. 34 C.F.R. §104.33.
  3. Free educational services except for those fees that are imposed on non-disabled students or their parents/guardians. Insurers and similar third parties are not relieved from an otherwise valid obligation to provide or pay for services provided to a disabled student. 34 C.F.R. §§104.33 and 300.14; 23 Admin Code §22.240.
  4. A placement in the least restrictive environment. 34 C.F.R. §104.34.
  5. Facilities, services, and activities that are comparable to those provided for non-disabled students. 34 C.F.R. §104.34.
  6. An evaluation prior to an initial Section 504 placement and any subsequent significant change in placement. 34 C.F.R. §104.34.
  7. Testing and other evaluation procedures conforming to the requirements of 34 C.F.R. §104.35 as to validation, administration, areas of evaluation, etc. The District shall consider information from a variety of sources, including aptitude and achievement tests, teacher recommendations, physical conditions, social and cultural background, adaptive behavior, physical or medical reports, student grades, progress reports, parent/guardian observations, anecdotal reports and standardized test scores. 34 C.F.R. §104.35; 23 Admin. Code §226.110.
  8. Placement decisions made by a group of persons, i.e., a Section 504 committee, including the parent(s)/guardian(s) persons knowledgeable about the student, the meaning of the evaluation data, the placement options and the legal requirements for the least restrictive environment and comparable facilities. 34 C.F.R. §§ 104.34 and 104.35.
  9. Periodic reevaluations. 34 C.F.R. §104.35.
  10. A notice prior to any action by the District in regard to the identification, evaluation, or placement of the student. 34 C.F.R. §104.36.
  11. Examine relevant records. 34 C.F.R. §104.36.
  12. An impartial due process hearing regarding the student’s identification, evaluation or educational placement including an opportunity for parental participation in the hearing and representation by an attorney. 34 C.F.R. §104.36.
    You must file a written Parental Request for an Impartial Due Process Hearing with the District Section 504 compliance coordinator or designee, if you disagree with the decision of the Section 504 committee. The request must be submitted to the District Section 504 compliance coordinator within 10 calendar days from the time you received the written notice of the District’s Section 504 committee decision. The Parental Request for an Impartial Due Process Hearing Officer, is designed to assist parents in requesting an impartial due process hearing and is available online at: www.isbe.state.il.us/spec-ed/pdfs/dp_parental_19-86a.pdf.The hearing will be scheduled before an impartial hearing officer and you will be notified in writing of the date, time, and place for the hearing. The hearing will conform to the requirements of 34 C.F.R. §300.512 and Section 14-8.02a of the School Code (105 ILCS 5/14-8.02a.). 34 C.F.R. §104.36; 23 Ill.Admin.Code §226.625. The impartial hearing officer shall issue a written decision, including findings of fact and conclusions of law, within 10 days after the conclusion of the hearing and send by certified mail a copy of the decision to the parents/guardians or student (if the student requests the hearing), the School District, the Director of Special Education, legal representatives of the parties, and the State Board of Education. 105 ILCS 5/14-8.02a(h).  The Section 504 compliance coordinator is Dr. John Capasso, District Superintendent, 605 N. Seventh, Fairbury, IL  61739, Ph. 815.692.2504.
  13. A review by a court of competent jurisdiction of the impartial hearing officer’s decision. 34 C.F.R. §104.36. Any appeal must be filed in a court of competent jurisdiction within 120 days after the impartial due process hearing officer’s decision is mailed to the party. 105 ILCS 5/14-8.02a(i).
  14. File a complaint with the District’s Section 504 coordinator or designee concerning Section 504 matters other than your student’s identification, evaluation and/or placement. The Section 504 coordinator or designee will investigate the allegations to the extent warranted by the nature of the complaint in an effort to reach a prompt and equitable resolution.
  15. File a complaint with the Office of Civil Rights. The Illinois regional Office of Civil Rights is located in Chicago at:

Chicago Office for Civil Rights
U.S. Department of Education
Citigroup Center
500 West Madison Street, Suite 1475
Chicago, IL 60661
Phone: 312/730-1560
Fax:    312/730-1567
TDD:    877/521-2172
Email:  OCR.Chicago@ed.gov

If you would like more information about the differences between Section 504 and IDEA, see Protecting Students with Disabilities FAQ about Section 504 and the Education of Children with Disabilities, available at: www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/504faq.html.

Sincerely,

Superintendent

POLICY APPROVED: September 20, 2012

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Article 630-E2 – Exhibit – Request to Access Classroom(s) or Personnel for Special Education Evaluation and/or Observation Purposes

Instruction
Exhibit – Request to Access Classroom(s) or Personnel for Special Education Evaluation and/or Observation Purposes

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Article 630.02 – Program for the Gifted

Instruction
Program for the Gifted

The Superintendent or designee shall implement an education program for gifted and talented learners. If the State Superintendent of Education issues a Request for Proposals because sufficient State funding is available to support local programs of gifted education, the Superintendent or designee shall inform the Board concerning the feasibility and advisability of developing a “plan for gifted education” that would qualify for State funding.

Eligibility to participate in the gifted program shall not be conditioned upon race, religion, sex, disability, or any factor other than the student’s identification as a gifted or talented learner.

In order to allow the School Board to monitor this policy, the Superintendent or designee shall report at least annually on the status of the District’s gifted program.

LEGAL REF.: 105 ILCS 5/14A-5 et seq.
23 Ill.Admin.Code Part 227.

POLICY APPROVED: April 20, 2006
POLICY AMENDED: September 20, 2012

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Article 630.10 – Title I Programs

Instruction
Title I Programs

The Superintendent or designee shall pursue funding under Title I, Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged, of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, to supplement instructional services and activities in order to improve the educational opportunities of educationally disadvantaged or deprived children.

All District schools, regardless of whether they receive Title I funds, shall provide services that, taken as a whole, are substantially comparable. Teachers, administrators, and other staff shall be assigned to schools in a manner that ensures equivalency among the District’s schools. Curriculum materials and instructional supplies shall be provided in a manner that ensures equivalency among the District’s schools.

Title I Parental Involvement
The District maintains programs, activities, and procedures for the involvement of parents/guardians of students receiving services, or enrolled in programs, under Title I. These programs, activities, and procedures are described in District-level and School-level compacts.

District-Level Parental Involvement Compact
The Superintendent or designee shall develop a District-Level Parental Involvement Compact according to Title I requirements. The District-Level Parental Involvement Compact shall contain: (1) the District’s expectations for parental involvement, (2) specific strategies for effective parent involvement activities to improve student academic achievement and school performance, and (3) other provisions as required by federal law. The Superintendent or designee shall ensure that the Compact is distributed to parents/guardians of students receiving services, or enrolled in programs, under Title I.

School-Level Parental Involvement Compact
Each Building Principal or designee shall develop a School-Level Parental Involvement Compact according to Title I requirements. This School-Level Parental Involvement Compact shall contain: (1) a process for continually involving parents/guardians in its development and implementation, (2) how parents/guardians, the entire school staff, and students share the responsibility for improved student academic achievement, (3) the means by which the school and parents/guardians build and develop a partnership to help children achieve the State’s high standards, and (4) other provisions as required by federal law. Each Building Principal or designee shall ensure that the Compact is distributed to parents/guardians of students receiving services, or enrolled in programs, under Title I.

LEGAL REF.: Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, 20 U.S.C. §6301 6514.

POLICY APPROVED: April 20, 2006

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Article 630.10-AP1 – Administrative Procedure – Checklist for Development, Implementation, and Maintenance of Parent Involvement Compacts for Title I Programs

Instruction
Administrative Procedure – Checklist for Development, Implementation, and Maintenance of Parent Involvement Compacts for Title I Programs

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Article 630.10-AP2 – Administrative Procedure – Notice to Parents Required by No Child Left

Instruction
Administrative Procedure – Notice to Parents Required by No Child Left
  1. Improving Basic Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies
    1. Annual report cards. Districts must disseminate an annual report card with aggregate information, including student achievement (designated by category), graduation rates, district performance, teacher qualifications, and other required information.
    2. Progress review. Districts must disseminate the results for its yearly progress review of each school.
    3. Teacher and paraprofessional qualifications. At the beginning of each school year, a school district that receives funds under this part shall notify the parents of each student attending any school receiving funds under this part that the parents may request, and the district will provide the parents on request, information regarding the professional qualifications of the student’s classroom teachers, including, at a minimum, the following:
      1. Whether the teacher has met the State qualifications and licensing criteria for the grade levels and subject areas in which the teacher provides instruction.
      2. Whether the teacher is teaching under emergency or other provisional status.
      3. The teacher’s baccalaureate degree major and any other graduate certifications or degrees.
      4. Whether paraprofessionals provide services to the student and, if so, their qualifications.
    4. Student achievement. Districts must provide to parents information on the level of achievement of the parent’s child in each of the State academic assessments.
    5. Non-highly qualified teachers. Districts must provide parents timely notice that the parent’s child has been assigned, or has been taught for 4 or more consecutive weeks by, a teacher who is not highly qualified.
  2. English Language Learners
    1. Language instruction educational programs. Districts must inform a parent of a limited English proficient child identified for participation, or participating in, such a program of the reasons for their child being identified, their child’s level of English proficiency, instructional method, how their child’s program will meet their child’s needs, how the program will help the child to learn English, exit requirements for the program to meet the objectives of any limited English proficiency, and information regarding parental rights.
    2. Insufficient language instruction educational programs. Each district using funds provided under this part to provide a language instruction educational program that has failed to make progress on the annual measurable achievement objectives described in Section 3122 for any fiscal year for which Part A is in effect, shall separately inform the parents of a child identified for participation in such a program, or participating in such program, of such failure not later than 30 days after such failure occurs.
    3. Outreach. Each district shall implement an effective means of outreach to parents of limited English proficient students to inform the parents regarding how they can be involved in their children’s education, and be active participants in assisting their children to attain English proficiency, achieve at high levels in core academic subjects, and meet challenging State academic achievement standards and State academic content standards expected of all students.  In addition, the outreach shall include holding, and sending notice of opportunities for, regular meetings for formulating and responding to parent recommendations.
  3. Academic Assessment and Local Education Agency and School Improvement
    1. Schools identified for school improvement, corrective action, or re-structuring. Districts shall promptly provide to parents of each student enrolled in an elementary school or a secondary school identified for school improvement under §6316(b)(1)(E)(i), for corrective action under §6316(b)(7)(C)(i), or for restructuring under §6316(b)(8)(A)(i).
      1. An explanation of what the identification means, and how the school compares in terms of academic achievement to other district schools and the State educational agency;
      2. The reasons for the identification;
      3. An explanation of what the school identified for school improvement is doing to address the problem;
      4. An explanation of what the district or State educational agency is doing to help the school address the achievement problem;
      5. An explanation of how the parents can become involved in addressing the academic issues that caused the school to be identified for school improvement; and
      6. An explanation of the parents’ option to transfer their child to another public school under paragraphs (1)(E), (5)(A), (7)(C)(i), (8)(A)(i), and subsection (c)(10)(C)(vii) (with transportation provided by the agency when required by paragraph (9)) or to obtain supplemental educational services for the child, in accordance with subsection (e).
    2. Schools identified for restructuring. Whenever the school fails to make adequate yearly progress and/or is restructured, the district shall provide the teachers and parents with an adequate opportunity to comment and participate in developing a plan.
    3. Schools identified for corrective action – supplemental services notice. The district shall provide annual notice to parents of each student enrolled in an elementary school or a secondary school identified for school improvement under §6316(b)(1)(E)(i), for corrective action under §6316(b)(7)(C)(i), or for restructuring under §6316(b)(8)(A)(i).
      1. The availability of supplemental education services;
      2. The identity of approved providers that are within the district or whose services are reasonably available in neighboring districts; and
      3. A brief description of those services, qualifications, and demonstrated effectiveness of each such provider.
  4. Parental Involvement
    1. Parental involvement policies. Parents shall be notified of the parental involvement policy in an understandable and uniform format and, to the extent practicable, provided in a language the parents can understand.  Such policy shall be made available to the local community and updated periodically to meet the changing needs of parents and the school.
    2. Meeting and information. Each school shall:
      1. Convene an annual meeting, at a convenient time, to which all parents of participating children shall be invited and encouraged to attend, to inform parents of their school’s participation, and to explain the requirements of this part, and the right of the parents to be involved;
      2. Offer a flexible number of meetings;
      3. Involve parents, in an organized, ongoing, and timely way, in the planning, review, and improvement of programs including the planning, review, and improvements of the school parental involvement policy and the joint development of the schoolwide program plan under §1114(b)(2);
      4. Provide parents of participating children:
        • Timely information about programs under this part;
        • A description and explanation of the curriculum in use at the school, the forms of academic assessment used to measure student progress, and the proficiency levels students are expected to meet; and
        • If requested by parents, opportunities for regular meetings to formulate suggestions and to participate, as appropriate, in decisions relating to the education of their children, and respond to any such suggestions as soon as practicably possible.
  5. Voluntary Public School Choice Program
    The district shall provide to parents of students in the area to be served by the Voluntary Public School Choice program with prompt notice of:

    1. The existence of the program;
    2. The program’s availability; and
    3. A clear explanation of how the program will operate.
  6. Education of Homeless Children and Youths
    1. Notice of rights. The district shall provide written notice, at the time any homeless child or youth seeks enrollment in such school, and at least twice annually while the child or youth is enrolled in such school, to the parent/guardian of the child or youth (or, in the case of an unaccompanied youth, the youth) that:
      1. Shall be signed by the parent/guardian;
      2. Sets the general rights provided under this subtitle;
      3. Specifically states:
        • The choice of schools homeless children and youths are eligible to attend,
        • That no homeless child or youth is required to attend a separate school for homeless children or youths,
        • That homeless children and youths shall be provided comparable services including transportation services, educational services, and meals through school meals programs;
        • That homeless children and youths should not be stigmatized by school personnel; and
        • Includes contact information for the local liaison for homeless children and youths.
    2. Assistance to unaccompanied youth. In the case of an unaccompanied homeless youth, the district shall ensure that the homeless liaison assists in placement or enrollment decisions under this subparagraph, considers the views of such unaccompanied youth, and provides notice to such youth of the right to appeal.
    3. Public notice of rights. Each district shall ensure that public notice of the educational rights of homeless children is disseminated where such children and youths receive services under this Act, such as schools, family shelters, and soup kitchens.
  7. Student Privacy
    1. Notice of privacy policy. The student privacy policies developed by a district shall provide for reasonable notice of the adoption or continued use of such policies directly to the parents of students enrolled in schools served by that district.  At a minimum, the district shall:
      1. Provide such notice at least annually, at the beginning of the school year, and within a reasonable period of time after any substantive change in such policies; and
      2. Offer an opportunity for the parent to opt the student out of the activity.
    2. Notification of specific events. Each district shall directly notify parents/guardians, at least annually at the beginning of the school year, of the specific or approximate dates when activities described in 20 U.S.C. §1232h(c)(2)(C) are scheduled.
    3. Notice of existing policy. All districts shall provide reasonable notice of such existing policies to parents and guardians of students, e.g., “The School Board has adopted and continues to use policies regarding student privacy, parental access to information, and administration of certain physical examinations to minors.  Copies of those policies are available on request.”

    LEGAL REF.:

      1. NCLB §6311(h)(2); 20 U.S.C. §6311(h)(2).
      2. NCLB §6316 (a)(1)(C); 20 U.S.C. §6316(a)(1)(C).
      3. NCLB §6311(h)(6)(A); 20 U.S.C. §6311(h)(6)(A).
      4. NCLB §6311(h)(6)(B)(i); 20 U.S.C. §6311(h)(6)(B)(i).
      5. NCLB §6311(h)(6)(B)(ii); 20 U.S.C. §6311(h)(6)(B)(ii).
      1. 1. NCLB §1112(g)(l)(A) and (g)(2), and §3302(a); 20 U.S.C. §6312(g)(1)(A) and (g)(2); 20 U.S.C. §7012(a).
      2. NCLB §1112(g)(l)(B), and §3302(b); 20 U.S.C. §6312(g)(1)(A) and (g)(2); 20 U.S.C. §7012(a).
      3. NCLB §1112(g)(4) and §3302(e); 20 U.S.C §6312(g)(4); 20 U.S.C. §7012(e)(1).
      1. NCLB §6316(b)(6); 20 U.S.C. §6316(b)(6).
      2. NCLB §6316(b)(8)(C); 20 U.S.C. §6316(b)(8)(C).
      3. NCLB §6316(e)(2)(A); 20 U.S.C. §6316(e)(2)(A).
      1. 1. NCLB §1118(b); 20 U.S.C. §6318(b).
      2. NCLB §1118(c); 20 U.S.C. §6318(c).
    1. NCLB §5245(a); 20 U.S.C. §7225d(a).
      1. 1. NCLB §722(e)(3)(C); 42 U.S.C. §11432(e)(3)(C).
      2. NCLB §722(g)(2)(B)(iii); 42 U.S.C. §11432(g)(3)(B)(iii).
      3. NCLB §722(g)(6)(A)(v); 42 U.S.C. §1432(g)(6)(A)(v).
      1. NCLB §1061(c)(2)(A); 20 U.S.C. §1232h(c)(2)(A).
      2. NCLB §1061; 20 U.S.C. §1232h(c)(2)(B).
      3. NCLB §1061(c)(3); 20 U.S.C. §1232h(c)(3).

POLICY APPROVED: April 20, 2006
POLICY AMENDED:  September 20, 2012

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Article 630.10-AP3 – Administrative Procedure – No Child Left Behind Checklist

Instruction
Administrative Procedure – No Child Left Behind Checklist

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Article 630.10-E1 – Exhibit – District-Level Parental Involvement Compact

Instruction
Exhibit – District-Level Parental Involvement Compact

This District-level compact provides an understanding of the joint responsibility of the District and parents/guardians to improve students’ academic achievement and school performance.  To that end, the District provides opportunities for parents/guardians involvement at the District level by:

  1. The District involves parents/guardians in the joint development of the District’s plan to help low-achieving children meet challenging achievement and academic standards 20 U.S.C. §6312), and the process of school review and improvement (20 U.S.C. §6316) by:
  • Establishing a District-level committee with parents/guardians liaisons from each building as well as representatives from other impacted programs, including Head Start.
  • Establishing meaningful, ongoing two-way communication between the District, staff and parents/guardians.
  • Developing a District newsletter to communicate to parents/guardians about the plan and seek their input and participation.
  • Training personnel on how to collaborate effectively with families with diverse backgrounds that may impede parents/guardians participation, e.g., illiteracy or language difficulty.
  1. The District provides the coordination, technical assistance, and other support necessary to assist participating schools in planning and implementing effective parents/guardians involvement activities to improve student academic achievement and school performance by:
  • Providing ongoing District-level workshops to assist buildings in planning and implementing improvement strategies.
  • Establishing training programs for building liaisons to bring the communication and facilitation skills to the buildings they represent.
  • Providing information to parents/guardians about the various assessment tools and instruments that will be developed to monitor progress.
  • Seeking input from parents/guardians in developing workshops.
  1. The District builds the capacity of schools and parents/guardians for strong parental involvement by:
  • Providing ongoing communication about the District-wide committee through District newsletters or other written or electronically communicated means.
  • Engaging the building PTO’s to actively seek out and involve parents/guardians through regular communication updates and information sessions.
  • Utilizing PTO’s to assist in identifying effective communication strategies based on their members’ needs.
  • Providing a master calendar of District meetings to discuss pertinent topics.
  1. The District coordinates and integrates parents/guardians involvement strategies under this compact with parents/guardians involvement strategies under other programs, such as, the Head Start program, Reading First program, Early Reading First program, Even Start program, Parents as Teachers program, and Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters, and State-run preschool programs by:
  • Involving District and program representatives to assist in identifying specific population needs.
  • Sharing data from other programs to assist in developing new initiatives to improve academic achievement and school improvement.
  1. The District conducts, with the involvement of parents/guardians, an annual evaluation of the content and effectiveness of the parents/guardians involvement policy in improving the academic quality of the schools served under Title I, including identifying barriers to greater participation by parents/guardians in activities authorized by this section (with particular attention to parents/guardians who are economically disadvantaged, are disabled, have limited English proficiency, have limited literacy, or are of any racial or ethnic minority background), and use the findings of such evaluation to design strategies for more effective parents/guardians involvement, and to revise, if necessary, the parents/guardians involvement policies described in this section by:
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of the content and communication methods through a variety of methods, including: focus groups, surveys, workshops, and informal coffees with District and building administrative staff, parents/guardians, and teachers.
  • Identifying barriers to effective evaluation by language support or other assistance as needed.
  • Identifying potential policy and compact changes to revise and improve program(s).
  1. The District involves parents/guardians in the activities of the schools served under Title I by:
  • Providing communication and calendar information to parents/guardians of upcoming meetings, discussions or events and encouraging their participation.
  • Providing Building Principal and PTO coordination of events.

POLICY APPROVED: April 20, 2006
POLICY AMENDED:  September 20, 2012

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Article 630.10-E2 – Exhibit – School-Level Parental Involvement Compact

Instruction
Exhibit – School-Level Parental Involvement Compact

This school-level parent involvement compact provides an understanding of the joint responsibility of the District and parents/guardians for improving student academic achievement and school performance.  The District provides opportunities for parent/guardian involvement at the school level by:

Parent/Guardian Involvement

  1. Convening an annual meeting, at a convenient time, to which all parents/guardians of participating children are invited and encouraged to attend, to inform parents/guardians of their school’s participation under Title I and to explain the requirements of Title I, and the right of the parents/guardians to be involved. The Building Principal or designee shall:
  • Invite all parents/guardians of participating children to the annual meeting at school.
  • Explain the rights of parents/guardians to be involved in establishing this compact.
  • Introduce and involve the building representatives on the District-level committee.
  • Provide an overview of Title I and give parents/guardians an opportunity to express questions and concerns.
  • Indicate the mechanisms by which the committee work will be communicated.
  • Seek the involvement and input of parents/guardians.
  • Provide child care so that all parents/guardians who would otherwise be unable to attend may attend.
  1. Offering a flexible number of meetings, such as meetings in the morning or evening, and may provide, with funds provided by the relevant provision in Title I, transportation, child care, or home visits, as such services relate to parental involvement. The Building Principal or designee shall:
  • Provide parents/guardians with opportunities to ask questions and dialogue informally about student academic achievement and school performance.
  • Engage building-based parent organizations to assist with communication and implementation needs.
  • Develop and use outreach programs to involve community groups and organizations.
  1. Involving parents/guardians in an organized, ongoing, and timely way, in the planning, review, and improvement of programs under Title I, including the planning, review, and improvement of the school parental involvement policy and the joint development of the school-wide program plan (under 20 U.S.C. §6314(b)(2)), except that if a school has in place a process for involving parents/guardians in the joint planning and design of the school’s programs, the school may use that process, if such process includes an adequate representation of parents/guardians of participating children. The Building Principal or designee shall:
  • Identify and establish a process by which an adequate representation of parents/guardians of participating children can occur.
  • Establish a schedule for the building-based committee to plan, review, and recommend improvements to the District parent involvement policy.
  1. The Building Principal or designee shall:
  • Provide parents/guardians of participating children timely information about programs.
  • Communicate updates through use of school newsletters, the District website, email and telephone contact, and home visits if needed.
  1. The Building Principal or designee will provide a description and explanation of the curriculum in use at the school, the forms of academic assessment used to measure student progress, and the proficiency levels students are expected to meet.
  2. The Building Principal or designee shall:
  • Provide parents/guardians, upon request, opportunities for regular meetings to formulate suggestions and to participate, as appropriate, in decisions relating to the education of their children, and respond to any suggestions as soon as practicably possible.
  • Develop a feedback loop for parents/guardians to ask questions and receive follow-up.
  1. If the school-wide plan under 20 U.S.C. §6314(b)(2) is not satisfactory to the parents/guardians of participating children, the Building Principal or designee shall:
  • Submit any comments when the school makes the plan available to the School Board.
  • Provide a process for parents/guardians to express concerns and complaints.

Shared Responsibilities for High Student Academic Achievement

  1. The School is responsible for providing a high-quality curriculum and instruction in a supportive and effective learning environment that enables the children served under Title I to meet the State’s student academic achievement standards. Each parent/guardian is responsible for supporting their children’s learning by:
  • Monitoring attendance, homework, and television viewing.
  • Volunteering in their child’s classroom and participating, as appropriate, in decisions relating to their children’s education and extracurricular activities.
  1. Communication between teachers and parents/guardians occurs on an ongoing basis through:
  • Parent-teacher conferences in elementary schools, at least annually, during which the compact shall be discussed as the compact relates to the individual child’s achievements.
  • Frequent reports to parents/guardians on their child’s progress.
  • Reasonable access to staff, opportunities to volunteer and participate in their child’s class, and observation of classroom activities.

Building Capacity for Involvement
To ensure effective involvement of parents/guardians and to support a partnership among the school’s involved, each school shall:

  • Provide assistance to parents/guardians in understanding the State’s academic content standards and State student academic achievement standards, State and local academic assessments, and how to monitor a child’s progress and work with educators to improve the achievement of their children.
  • Provide materials and training, such as, literacy, technology, etc., to help parents/guardians work with their children to improve their children’s achievement.
  • Educate teachers and other staff in the value and utility of contributions of parents/guardians and how to effectively communicate and work with parents/guardians as equal partners.
  • Implement and coordinate parent/guardian programs that will build ties between them and the school.
  • To the extent feasible and appropriate, coordinate and integrate parent/guardian involvement programs and activities with Head Start, Reading First, Early Reading First, Even Start, the Home Instruction Programs for Preschool Youngsters, the Parents as Teachers Program and public preschool and other programs and conduct other activities, such as parent/guardian resource centers, that encourage and support parents/guardians in more fully participating in their children’s education.
  • Ensure that information is sent to the parents/guardians of participating children in a format and language that parents/guardians can understand.
  • Involve parents/guardians in the development of training for teachers, Building Principals, and other educators to improve the effectiveness of such training.
  • Provide necessary literacy training from funds provided by the relevant provision in Title I if the District has exhausted all other reasonably available sources of funding for such training.
  • Pay reasonable and necessary expenses associated with local parental involvement activities, including transportation and child care costs to enable parents/guardians to participate in school-related meetings and training sessions.
  • Train parents/guardians to encourage and enhance the involvement of other parents/guardians.
  • Use outreach programs to involve community groups and organizations.
  • Arrange school meetings at a variety of times, or conduct in-home conferences between teachers and other educators, in order to maximize parental involvement and participation.
  • Adopt and implement model approaches to improving parental involvement.
  • Establish a District-wide parent advisory council to provide advice on all matters related to parental involvement in supported programs.
  • Develop appropriate roles for community-based organizations and businesses in parent/guardian involvement activities.
  • Provide such other reasonable support for parental involvement activities under this section as parents/guardians may request.

In carrying out the parental involvement requirements of this compact, the school, to the extent practicable, will provide full opportunities for the participation of parents/guardians with limited English proficiency or disabilities, including providing information and school reports in a format and, to the extent practicable, in a language such parents/guardians understand.

POLICY APPROVED: April 20, 2006
POLICY AMENDED:  September 20, 2012

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Article 630.12 – Education of Homeless Children

Instruction
Education of Homeless Children

Each child of a homeless individual and each homeless youth has equal access to the same free, appropriate public education, as provided to other children and youths, including a public pre-school education. A “homeless child” is defined as provided in the McKinney Homeless Assistance Act and State law. The Superintendent shall act as or appoint a Liaison for Homeless Children to coordinate this policy’s implementation.

A homeless child may attend the District school that the child attended when permanently housed or in which the child was last enrolled. A homeless child living in any District school’s attendance area may attend that school.

The Superintendent or designee shall review and revise rules or procedures that may act as barriers to the enrollment of homeless children and youths. In reviewing and revising such procedures, consideration shall be given to issues concerning transportation, immunization, residency, birth certificates, school records and other documentation, and guardianship. Transportation shall be provided in accordance with the McKinney Homeless Assistance Act and State law. The Superintendent or designee shall give special attention to ensuring the enrollment and attendance of homeless children and youths who are not currently attending school. If a child is denied enrollment or transportation under this policy, the Liaison for Homeless Children shall immediately refer the child or his or her parent/guardian to the ombudsperson appointed by the Regional Superintendent and provide the child or his or her parent/guardian with a written explanation for the denial. Whenever a child and his or her parent/guardian who initially share the housing of another person due to loss of housing, economic hardship, or a similar hardship continue to share the housing, the Liaison for Homeless Children shall, after the passage of 18 months and annually thereafter, conduct a review as to whether such hardship continues to exist in accordance with State law.

LEGAL REF.: McKinney Homeless Assistance Act, 42 U.S.C. §11431 et seq.
105 ILCS 45/1-1 et seq.

POLICY APPROVED: March 16, 2006

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Article 630.12-AP – Administrative Procedure – Education of Homeless Children

Instruction
Administrative Procedure – Education of Homeless Children
ActorAction
Superintendent
Preliminary Steps
Serve as or designate an appropriate staff person, who may also be a coordinator for other federal programs, to serve as a Liaison for Homeless Children. 42 U.S.C. §11432 (g)(1)(J)(ii).
Under the McKinney Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. §11434a), “homeless children” means individuals who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence (within the meaning of Section 11302(a)(1)). The term includes: 42 U.S.C. §11434a.
1. Children and youths who are sharing the housing of other persons due to loss of housing, economic hardship, or a similar reason; are living in motels, hotels, trailer parks, or camping grounds due to the lack of alternative adequate accommodations; are living in emergency or transitional shelters; are abandoned in hospitals; or are awaiting foster care placement;
2. Children and youths who have a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings (within the meaning of Section 11302(a)(2)(C);
3. Children and youths who are living in cars, parks, public spaces, abandoned buildings, substandard housing, bus or train stations, or similar settings; and
4. Migratory children (Sec. 1309 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965) who qualify as homeless under this subtitle because the children are living in clauses (1) through (3) above.
Under State law, 105 ILCS 45/1-5, “homeless person, child, or youth” includes, but is not limited to, any of the following:
1. An individual who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime place of abode.
2. An individual who has a primary nighttime place of abode that is:
a. A supervised publicly or privately operated shelter designed to provide temporary living accommodations (including welfare hotels, congregate shelters, and transitional housing);
b. An institution that provides a temporary residence for individuals intended to be institutionalized; or
c. A public or private place not designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings.
Liaison for Homeless Children
Duties
Review the information provided at www.isbe.net/homeless/default.htm in order to become aware of the resources and training materials provided by the Illinois State Board of Education with regard to the education of homeless children.
Ensure that homeless children are identified by school personnel and through coordinated activities with other entities and agencies. 42 U.S.C. §11432(g)(6)(A)(i).
Ensure that homeless children enroll in, and have full and equal opportunity to succeed in District programs. 42 U.S.C. §11432(g)(6)(A)(ii).
Ensure that homeless families and children receive educational services for which they are eligible and make referrals to health, mental health, dental, and other appropriate services. 42 U.S.C. §11432(g)(6)(A)(iii).
Inform parent(s)/guardian(s) of educational and related opportunities available to their child or ward, and provide them with meaningful opportunities to participate in their child or ward’s education. 42 U.S.C. §11432(g)(6)(A)(iv).
Disseminate public notice of the educational rights of homeless students in the location where homeless children receive services (such as schools, family shelters, and soup kitchens). 42 U.S.C. §11432(g)(6)(A)(v).
Mediate enrollment disputes to: 42 U.S.C. §11432(g)(3)(E) and 42 U.S.C. §11432(g)(6)(A)(vi).
a. Ensure the child is immediately admitted to the school in which enrollment is sought, pending resolution of the dispute;
b. Provide the homeless child’s parent/guardian with a written explanation of the school's decision regarding school selection or enrollment, including their rights to appeal the decision;
c. Complete the dispute resolution process as expeditiously as possible; and
d. In the case of an unaccompanied youth, ensure that the youth is immediately enrolled in school pending resolution of the dispute.
Fully inform the parent/guardian of a homeless child, and any unaccompanied youth, of all transportation services and assist in accessing transportation services. 42 U.S.C. §11432(g)(6)(A)(vii).
Assist unaccompanied youth in placement/enrollment decisions, consider the youth’s wishes in those decisions, and provide notice to the youth of the right to appeal such decisions. 42 U.S.C. §11432(g)(3)(B)(ii).
Assist children who do not have immunizations or medical records in obtaining necessary immunizations and/or medical records. 42 U.S.C. §11432(g)(3)(C)(iii).
Collaborate with State and local social service agencies that provide services to the homeless as well as with community and school personnel responsible for the provision of education and related services to homeless children and youths. 42 U.S.C. §11432(g)(5)(A) and (g)(6)(C).
Conduct a hardship review whenever a child and his or her parent/guardian who initially share the housing of another person due to loss of housing, economic hardship, or a similar hardship continue to share the housing; a hardship review should be performed after the passage of 18 months and annually thereafter. 105 ILCS 45/1-25(a-5).
Refer the child or his or her parent/guardian to the ombudsperson appointed by the Regional Superintendent whenever a school denies a homeless child enrollment or transportation, and provide the child or his or her parent/guardian with a written statement of the basis for the denial. 105 ILCS 45/1-25(a).
Parent(s)/guardian(s)
Assignment
Choose the child’s attendance center between the following options (105 ILCS 45/1-10 controls because it exceeds the rights granted to parent(s)/guardian(s) in federal law.):
a. Continuing the child’s education in the school of origin for as long as the child remains homeless or, if the child becomes permanently housed, until the end of the academic year during which the housing is acquired; or
b. Enrolling the child in any school that non-homeless students who live in the attendance area in which the child or youth is actually living are eligible to attend.
The term “school of origin” means the school that the student attended when permanently housed or the school in which the student was last enrolled. 42 U.S.C. §11432(g)(3)(G) and 105 ILCS 45/1-5.
Building Principal Where Homeless Student Will be Enrolled
Enrollment
Shall immediately enroll the homeless child, even if the child is unable to produce records normally required for enrollment, e.g., previous academic records, medical records, proof of residency, or other documentation. 42 U.S.C. §11432(g)(3)(C)(i) and 105 ILCS 45/1-20.
Shall immediately contact the school last attended by the child to obtain relevant academic and other records. 42 U.S.C. §11432(g)(3)(C)(ii) and 105 ILCS 45/1-20.
If the child needs to obtain immunizations, or immunization or medical records, shall immediately refer the child’s parent/guardian to the Liaison for Homeless Children. 42 U.S.C. §11432(g)(3)(C)(iii) and 105 ILCS 45/1-20.
Maintain records for the homeless student that are ordinarily kept for students according to District policy and procedure on student school records. 42 U.S.C. §11432(g)(3)(D).
Ensure each homeless student is provided services comparable to services offered to other students including the following: 42 U.S.C. §11432(g)(4).
a. Transportation services;
b. Educational services for which the student meets the eligibility criteria, such as services provided under Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 or similar State or local programs;
c. Educational programs for children with disabilities and educational programs for students with limited English proficiency;
d. Programs in vocational and technical education as well as programs for gifted and talented students; and
e. School nutrition programs.
Shall require a parent/guardian of a homeless student, if available, to submit contact information. 42 U.S.C. §11432(g)(3)(H) and 105 ILCS 45/1-20.
Transportation Director and Building Principal Where Homeless Student Will be Enrolled
Transportation
Ensure transportation is provided to a homeless student, at the request of the parent/guardian (or in the case of an unaccompanied youth, the Liaison), to and from the school of origin. 42 U.S.C. §11432(g)(1)(J)(iii); State law, found at 105 ILCS 45/1-15, is superseded by federal law. The term “school of origin” means the school that the student attended when permanently housed or the school in which the student was last enrolled. 42 U.S.C. §11432(g)(3)(G). Transportation shall be arranged as follows: 42 U.S.C. §11432(g)(1)(J)(iii).
1. If the homeless student continues to live in the area served by the school district in which the school of origin is located, the student’s transportation to and from the school of origin shall be provided or arranged by the district in which the school of origin is located.
2. If the homeless student’s living arrangements in the area served by the district of origin terminate and the student, though continuing his or her education in the school of origin, begins living in an area served by another school district, the district of origin and the district in which the homeless student is living shall agree upon a method to apportion the responsibility and costs for providing the student with transportation to and from the school of origin. If the local educational agencies are unable to agree upon such method, the responsibility and costs for transportation shall be shared equally.
Superintendent or Designee
Dispute
If a dispute arises, shall inform the homeless child’s parent(s)/guardian(s) of the availability of an investigator, sources for low-cost or free legal assistance, and other advocacy services in the community.
Each Regional Superintendent appoints an ombudsperson to provide resource information and resolve disputes at schools within his or her jurisdiction relating to the rights of homeless children under this Act. 105 ILCS 45/1-25. The Homeless Family Placement Act governs shelter placement. 310 ILCS 85/1 et seq.

POLICY APPROVED: March 16, 2006

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Article 630.14 – Migrant Students

Instruction
Migrant Students

The Superintendent will develop and implement a program to address the needs of migrant children in the District.

This program will include a means to:

  1. Identify migrant students and assess their educational and related health and social needs.
  2. Provide a full range of services to migrant students including applicable Title I programs, special education, gifted education, vocational education, language programs, counseling programs, and elective classes.
  3. Provide migrant children with the opportunity to meet the same statewide assessment standards that all children are expected to meet.
  4. Provide advocacy and outreach programs to migrant children and their families and professional development for District staff.
  5. Provide parents/guardians an opportunity for meaningful participation in the program.

Migrant Education Program for Parents/Guardians Involvement
Parents/guardians of migrant students will be involved in and regularly consulted about the development, implementation, operation, and evaluation of the migrant program.

Parents/guardians of migrant students will receive instruction regarding their role in improving the academic achievement of their children.

LEGAL REF.: No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, §1301 et seq., 20 U.S.C. §6391 et seq.
34 C.F.R. §200.80 et seq.
105 ILCS 5/14B-6

POLICY APPROVED: March 16, 2006
POLICY AMENDED:  November 15, 2012

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Article 630.16 – Home and Hospital Instruction

Instruction
Home and Hospital Instruction

A student who is absent from school, or whose physician anticipates that the student will be absent from school, because of a medical condition may be eligible for instruction in the student’s home or hospital. Eligibility shall be determined by State law and the Illinois State Board of Education rule governing the continuum of placement options for home/hospital services. Appropriate educational services from qualified staff will begin no later than 5 school days after receiving a physician’s written statement. Instructional or related services for a student receiving special education services will be determined by the student’s individualized education program.

A student who is unable to attend school because of pregnancy will be provided home instruction, correspondence courses, or other courses of instruction (1) before the birth of the child when the student’s physician indicates, in writing, that she is medically unable to attend regular classroom instruction, and (2) for up to 3 months after the child’s birth or a miscarriage.

Periodic conferences will be held between appropriate school personnel, parent(s)/guardian(s), and hospital staff to coordinate course work and facilitate a student’s return to school.

LEGAL REF.: 105 ILCS 5/10-22.6a, 5/14-13.01, 5/18-4.5, and 5/18-8.05.
23 Ill.Admin.Code §§1.610 and 226.300.

POLICY ADOPTED: July 25, 1986
POLICY AMENDED: September 20, 2012

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Article 630.18 – Language Learners

Instruction
Language Learners

The District offers opportunities for resident English Language Learners to develop high levels of academic attainment in English and to meet the same academic content and student academic achievement standards that all children are expected to attain.  The Superintendent or designee shall develop and maintain a program for Language Learners that will:

  1. Assist all English Language Learners to achieve English proficiency, facilitate effective communication in English, and encourage their full participation in school activities and programs as well as promote participation by the parents/guardians of English Language Learners.
  2. Appropriately identify students with limited English-speaking ability.
  3. Comply with State law regarding the Transitional Bilingual Educational Program (TBE) or Transitional Program of Instruction (TPI), whichever is applicable.
  4. Comply with any applicable State and federal requirements for the receipt of grant money for English Language Learners and programs to serve them.
  5. Determine the appropriate instructional program and environment for English Language Learners.
  6. Annually assess the English proficiency of English Language Learners and monitor their progress in order to determine their readiness for a mainstream classroom environment.
  7. Include English Language Learners, to the extent required by State and federal law, in the District’s student assessment program to measure their achievement in reading/language arts and mathematics.
  8. Provide information to the parents/guardians of English Language Learners about: (1) the reasons for their child’s identification, (2) their child’s level of English proficiency, (3) the method of instruction to be used, (4) how the program will meet their child’s needs, (5) specific exit requirements of the program, (6) how the program will meet their child’s individualized education program, if applicable, and (7) information on parent/guardian rights.  Parents/guardians will be regularly apprised of their child’s progress and involvement will be encouraged.

Parent Involvement
Parents/guardians of English Language Learners will be:  (1) given an opportunity to provide input to the program, and (2) provided notification regarding their child’s placement in, and information about, the District’s English Language Learners program.

LEGAL REF.: 20 U.S.C. §§6312-6319 and 6801.
34 C.F.R. Part 200.
105 ILCS 5/14C-1 etseq.
23 Ill.Admin.Code Part 228.

POLICY APPROVED: March 16, 2006
POLICY AMENDED:  November 15, 2012

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Article 635.01 – Extended Instructional Programs

Instruction
Extended Instructional Programs

The District may offer the following programs in accordance with State law and the District’s educational philosophy:

  1. Nursery schools for children between the ages of 2 and 6 years.
  2. Before-and after-school programs for students in grades K-6.
  3. Child care and training center for pre-school children and for students whose parents work.
  4. Model day care program in cooperation with the State Board of Education.
  5. Tutorial program.
  6. Adult education program.
  7. Outdoor education program.
  8. Summer school, whether for credit or not.
  9. Independent study, whether for credit or not.
  10. Chemically dependent prevention program for students who are, or whose parents/guardians are, chemically dependent.
  11. Activities to address intergroup conflict.
  12. Volunteer service credit program.
  13. Vocational academy.

Reasonable fees may be charged.

LEGAL REF.:  105 ILCS 5/10-22.18a, 5/10-22.18b, 5/10-22.18c, 5/10-22.20, 5/10-22.20b, 5/10‑22.20c, 5/10-22.29, 5/10-22.33A, 5/10-22.33B, 5/10-23.2, 5/27-22.1, 5/27-22.3, 5/27-23.6, 110/3, and 433/.

POLICY ADOPTED: July 25, 1986
POLICY AMENDED:  November 15, 2012

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Article 645.01 – Instructional Materials

Instruction
Instructional Materials

All District classrooms and learning centers should be equipped with an evenly-proportioned, wide assortment of instructional materials, including textbooks, workbooks, audio-visual materials, and electronic materials.  These materials should provide quality learning experiences for students and:

  1. Enrich and support the curriculum;
  2. Stimulate growth in knowledge, literary appreciation, aesthetic values, and ethical standards;
  3. Provide background information to enable students to make informed judgments and promote critical reading and thinking;
  4. Depict in an accurate and unbiased way the cultural diversity and pluralistic nature of American society;
  5. Contribute to a sense of the worth of all people regardless of sex, race, religion, nationality, ethnic origin, sexual orientation, disability, or any other differences that may exist;

The Superintendent or designee shall annually provide a list or description of textbooks and instructional materials used in the District to the School Board.  Anyone may inspect any textbook or instructional material.

Teachers are encouraged to use supplemental material only when it will enhance, or otherwise illustrate, the subjects being taught and to ensure it is age-appropriate.  No R-rated movie shall be shown to students unless prior approval is received from the Superintendent or designee, and no movie rated NC-17 (no one 17 and under admitted) shall be shown under any circumstances.  These restrictions apply to television programs and other media with equivalent ratings.

Instructional Materials Selection and Adoption
The Superintendent shall approve the selection of all textbooks and instructional materials according to the standards described in this policy. The School Code governs the adoption and purchase of textbooks and instructional materials.

LEGAL REF.:  105 ILCS 5/10-20.8, 5/10-20.9, and 5/28-19.1.

POLICY APPROVED: April 20, 2006
POLICY AMENDED:  December 20, 2012

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Article 645.03 – Complaints About Curriculum, Instructional Materials, and Programs

Instruction
Complaints About Curriculum, Instructional Materials, and Programs

Persons with suggestions or complaints about curriculum, instructional materials, and programs should complete a curriculum objection form and/or use the Uniform Grievance Procedure. A parent/guardian may request that his/her child be exempt from using a particular instructional material or program by completing a curriculum objection form.

POLICY APPROVED: April 20, 2006 POLICY AMENDED: December 20, 2012

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Article 645.03-E – Exhibit – Curriculum Objection

Instruction
Exhibit – Curriculum Objection

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Article 645.07 – Library Media Program

Instruction
Library Media Program

The Superintendent or designee shall manage the District’s library media program to comply with (1) State law and Illinois State Board of Education rules and (2) the following standards:

  1. The program includes an organized collection of resources available to students and staff to supplement classroom instruction, foster reading for pleasure, enhance information literacy, and support research, as appropriate to students of all abilities in the grade levels served.
  2. Financial resources for the program’s resources and supplies are allocated to meet students’ needs.
  3. Students in all grades served have equitable access to library media resources.
  4. The advice of an individual who is qualified according to ISBE rule is sought regarding the overall direction of the program, including the selection and organization of materials, provision of instruction in information and technology literacy, and structuring the work of library paraprofessionals.
  5. Staff members are invited to recommend additions to the collection.
  6. Students may freely select resource center materials as well as receive guided selection of materials appropriate to specific, planned learning experiences.

LEGAL REF.:  23 Ill.Admin.Code §1.420(o).

POLICY APPROVED: April 20, 2006
POLICY AMENDED:  December 20, 2012

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Article 645.09 – Field Trips

Instruction
Field Trips

Field trips are permissible when the experiences are a part of the school curriculum and/or contribute to the District’s educational objectives.
All field trips must have the Superintendent or designee’s prior approval, except that field trips beyond a 200-mile radius of the school or extending overnight must have the prior approval of the School Board. The Superintendent or designee shall analyze the following factors to determine whether to approve a field trip: educational value, student safety, parent concerns, heightened security alerts, and liability concerns. On all field trips, a bus fee set by the Superintendent or designee may be charged to help defray the transportation costs.
Parents/guardians of students: (1) shall be given the opportunity to consent to their child’s participation in any field trip, and (2) are responsible for all entrance fees, food, lodging, or other costs, except that the District will pay such costs for students who qualify for free or reduced school lunches. All non-participating students shall be provided an alternative experience. Any field trip may be cancelled without notice due to an unforeseen event or condition.

LEGAL REF.: 105 ILCS 5/29-3.1.

POLICY APPROVED: July 25, 1986
POLICY AMENDED: December 20, 2012

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Article 645.11 – Community Resource Persons and Volunteers

Instruction
Community Resource Persons and Volunteers

The School Board encourages the use of resource persons and volunteers to:  (1) increase students’ educational attainment, (2) provide enrichment experiences for students, (3) increase the effective utilization of staff time and skills, (4) give more individual attention to students, and (5) promote greater community involvement.

Resource persons and volunteers may be used:

  1. For non-teaching duties not requiring instructional judgment or evaluation of students;
  2. For supervising study halls, long distance teaching reception areas used incident to instructional programs transmitted by electronic media (such as computers, video, and audio), detention and discipline areas, and school-sponsored extracurricular activities;
  3. To assist with academic programs under a certificated teacher’s immediate supervision;
  4. As a guest lecturer or resource person under a certificated teacher’s direction and with the administration’s approval; or
  5. As supervisors, chaperones, or sponsors for non-academic school activities.

The Superintendent shall establish procedures for securing and screening resource persons and volunteers.  A person who is a “sex offender,” as defined by the Sex Offender Registration Act, or a “violent offender against youth,” as defined in the Child Murderer and Violent Offender Against Youth Registration Act, is prohibited from being a resource person or volunteer.

LEGAL REF.: 105 ILCS 5/10-22.34, 5/10-22.34a, and 5/10-22.34b.
730 ILCS 152/101 et seq. and 154/75-105.

POLICY ADOPTED: February, 2001
POLICY AMENDED: December 20, 2012

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Article 645.11-AP – Administrative Procedure – Securing and Screening Resource Persons and Volunteers

Instruction
Administrative Procedure – Securing and Screening Resource Persons and Volunteers

The Building Principal or designee directs the use of resource persons and volunteers within his or her building.  Specifically, the Principal or designee directs recruitment, screening, placement, and training within the following parameters:

Qualifications – Resource persons and volunteers may come from all backgrounds and all age groups.  The main qualification is for the individual to have a desire to give his or her time and talent to enrich student learning opportunities and the school community generally.

Individuals Not Allowed to Serve as a School Volunteer or Resource Person – No individual who is a “sex offender,” as defined by the Sex Offender Registration Act, or a “violent offender against youth,” as defined in the Child Murderer and Violent Offender Against Youth Registration Act, may serve as a resource person or volunteer.  Whenever an individual submits a new volunteer information form, the Building Principal or designee shall review the Illinois Sex Offender Registry and the violent offenders against youth database maintained by the State Police.  The Building Principal may request an individual to submit to a criminal history records check if the individual will be working over a long period of time in direct contact with students where no staff member is continuously present or in other situations where a check would be prudent.  In addition, the Building Principal or designee shall review each new list received from law enforcement containing the names of sex offenders (authorized by the Sex Offender Community Notification Law) and violent offenders against youth (authorized by the Child Murderer and Violent Offender Against Youth Community Notification Law) to determine if any resource person or volunteer appears on it.

Recruitment – School personnel may recruit resource persons and volunteers through the following resources:  parents/guardians, parent organizations, retired teachers and other senior citizen groups, community businesses, local volunteer centers, and universities.  If a staff member, other than the Building Principal, recruits someone, the staff member must provide the individual’s name and address to the Building Principal.

Role – Resource persons and volunteers serve only in an auxiliary capacity under the direction and supervision of a staff member; they are not a substitute for a member of the school staff. Resource persons and volunteers do not have access to confidential student school records.

Selection, Placement, and Supervision – Selection and placement shall be on the basis of an individual’s qualifications and availability and the school’s needs.  The individual will be assigned to a staff member only with the staff member’s consent.  The relationship between the individual and staff member should be one of mutual respect and confidence.

Requirements – Each resource person and volunteer must register in the school’s main office at the beginning of each visit and wear a name tag while in the building or serving.  Unless he or she has already done so during the current academic year, the individual must complete an information form and waiver.  Absent an indication on the form that the individual may not qualify, the individual may proceed to the assigned activity.

An individual is prohibited from being a resource person or volunteer if he or she behaves in any manner that demonstrates he or she is not a good role model or is otherwise detrimental to the school environment.  Examples of such behavior include: swearing, failing to be dependable, failing to follow the supervisor’s instructions, committing any criminal act on school grounds or at a school activity, touching a student in a rude or overly forceful manner, failing to dress in an appropriate manner, or violating any school rule.

Training – Each academic year, when an individual first completes the registration form, the Principal or designee should give the individual a copy of this administrative procedure along with other pertinent information.  The staff member to whom the individual is assigned is responsible for explaining what is expected of the individual.  The Principal or designee should arrange appropriate training opportunities for those volunteer activities requiring a skill or knowledge base, e.g., working in the computer lab.

POLICY APPROVED: February, 2001
POLICY AMENDED:  December 20, 2012

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Article 645.11-E – Exhibit – Resource Persons and Volunteer Information Form and Waiver of Liability

Instruction
Exhibit – Resource Persons and Volunteer Information Form and Waiver of Liability

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Article 655.05 – Homework

Instruction
Homework

Homework is part of the District’s instructional program and has the overarching goal of increasing student achievement.  Homework is assigned to further a student’s educational development and is an application or adaptation of a classroom experience. The Superintendent shall provide guidance to ensure that homework:

  1. Is used to reinforce and apply previously covered concepts, principles, and skills;
  2. Is not assigned for disciplinary purposes;
  3. Serves as a communication link between the school and parents/guardians;
  4. Encourages independent thought, self-direction, and self-discipline; and
  5. Is of appropriate frequency and length, and does not become excessive, according to the teacher’s best professional judgment.

POLICY APPROVED: July 25, 1986
POLICY AMENDED:  January 17, 2013

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Article 655.07 – Grading and Promotion

Instruction
Grading and Promotion

The Superintendent shall establish a system of grading and reporting academic achievement to students and their parents/guardians. The system shall also determine when promotion and graduation requirements are met. The decision to promote a student to the next grade level shall be based on successful completion of the curriculum, attendance, performance based on the Illinois Standards Achievement Tests, or other testing. A student shall not be promoted based upon age or any other social reason not related to academic performance.  The administration shall determine remedial assistance for a student who is not promoted.

Every teacher shall maintain an evaluation record for each student in the teacher’s classroom. A District administrator cannot change the final grade assigned by the teacher without notifying the teacher. Reasons for changing a student’s final grade include:

  • A miscalculation of test scores,
  • A technical error in assigning a particular grade or score,
  • The teacher agrees to allow the student to do extra work that may impact the grade,
  • An inappropriate grading system used to determine the grade, or
  • An inappropriate grade based on an appropriate grading system.

Should a grade change be made, the administrator making the change must sign the changed record.

LEGAL REF.: 105 ILCS 5/2-3.64, 5/10-20.9a, 5/10-21.8, and 5/27-27.

POLICY ADOPTED:  July 20, 1998
POLICY AMENDED: December 20, 2012

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Article 655.07-AP – Administrative Procedure – Grading and Promotion

Instruction
Administrative Procedure – Grading and Promotion
  1. The teacher will
    1. Inform students about the grading system at the beginning of each school year or term, whichever is applicable.
    2. Explain that grades: (1) assess progress toward education goals and assist in the improvement of that progress, (2) will be given by the teacher, using his or her professional judgment, in an impartial and consistent manner, and (3) will reflect excessive, unexcused absences.
    3. Assess student achievement as demonstrated through such performance indicators as the following (these are not listed in order of importance):
      1. Preparation of assignments, including completeness, accuracy, legibility, and promptness.
      2. Contribution to classroom discussions.
      3. Demonstrated understanding of concepts.
      4. Application of skills and knowledge to new situations.
      5. Organization, presentation, and content of written and oral reports.
      6. Originality and reasoning ability when working through problems.
      7. Accomplishment in class presentations and projects.
      8. Performance on tests, quizzes, and final examinations.
    4. Assign grades for academic improvement and achievement using standardized criterion-referenced test scores, letter grades, and/or other assigned numerical criteria.
    5. Arrange a special conference with the parent(s)/guardian(s) or send the parent(s)/guardian(s) a written report, whenever it becomes evident that a student is in danger of failing
  2. The principal will
    1. Supervise implementation of this administrative procedure.
    2. Insure that parent(s)/guardian(s) are informed of their student’s progress at regular intervals, but at least 4 times a year, and whenever the student’s performance requires special attention (divorced or separated parents will both be informed unless a court order requires otherwise). All grades and symbols must be appropriately explained.
    3. Establish an appropriate means of communication whenever he or she becomes aware that a parent/guardian is unable to understand written communications from the school or oral communications made during conferences related to the student’s progress or school activities.
    4. Develop a timetable for deficiency reports.
    5. Supervise the various methods for communicating with parents/guardians including:
      1. Parent-teacher conferences, conducted on a regular basis. They may be scheduled on different days and at different times to accommodate the various grade levels and attendance centers.
      2. Open houses, parent education meetings, and newsletters.
      3. Interim reports, through which teachers contact parents/guardians whenever teachers believe additional information should be shared. Teachers shall try to be available to meet with parents/guardians at a mutually agreed upon time.
  3. The PK-8 principal will
    1. Make the final decision for a student’s retention with input from the classroom teacher, parent/guardian, and other school personnel as appropriate. Retention decisions are based on quantitative measures (e.g., maturity level, ability, and level of academic achievement), supplemented by a qualitative assessment of the student’s motivation, self-image, and social adjustment.  Students shall not be promoted for purely social reasons.
    2. Recommend placement, promotion, or retention based on the student’s best interests after a careful evaluation of the advantages and disadvantages of alternatives.
    3. Arrange for an individual remediation plan, developed in consultation with the parents/guardians, for students demonstrating a proficiency level one or more grades below current placement. The remediation plan may include summer school, extended school day, special homework, tutorial sessions, modified instructional materials, other modifications in the instructional program, reduced class size, or retention in grade.
  4. The 9-12 principal will
    1. Implement a system for calculating grade point average (including all advanced placement, honors, and accelerated courses).
    2. Supervise the computation of class rank.
    3. Designates academic distinctions (e.g. valedictorian, salutatorian, Top Ten Scholars, etc.)
  5. The principal at all levels will
    1. Confer with any parent/guardian and/or student who objects to a grade or retention decision.
    2. Discuss with the teacher the reasons why the parents/guardians and/or student objects to a grade or retention decision and requests the teacher’s perspective.
    3. Determine whether to change the grade based on the existence of any of the following:
      1. A miscalculation of test scores;
      2. A technical error in assigning a particular grade or score;
      3. The teacher agrees to allow the student to do extra work that may impact the grade;
      4. An inappropriate grading system used to determine the grade; or
      5. An inappropriate grade based on an appropriate grading system.
    4. Decide whether to change the grade and, if so, notifies the teacher of the nature and reason for the change and signs the changed record.
  6. The parent/guardians will
    1. Attend parent-teacher conferences.
    2. Provide a study-conducive atmosphere and supervise their child’s completion of course work.
    3. Sign their student’s report cards and other assessment notices and provide appropriate feedback to their child.
    4. Contact the appropriate teacher or other school staff member when a question about their child’s progress arises.
    5. First confer with the appropriate teacher and, if still not satisfied, contact the Building Principal in order to object to a grade or retention decision.

POLICY ADOPTED:   December 20, 2012

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Article 655.08 – Acceleration (Double Promotion)

Instruction
Acceleration (Double Promotion)

Acceleration, or double promotion, is defined as a student’s advancement of two (2) grade levels.   The District’s position is that a student should progress through school with age peers.  However, it is acknowledged that a student who exhibits exceptional academic, social, and emotional growth or growth potential may be eligible for advanced placement.  A decision to accelerate, or double promote, shall be based principally on the ability and performance of a child and shall be considered only in instances where there is the highest probability that the student will benefit academically, socially, and emotionally.

Standards
Before double promotion is granted, the following standards must be met:

  1. The student is in grades PreK-4.
  2. The student’s birthday falls before November 1.
  3. The request for double promotion comes from a parent or guardian; or from a member of the District’s staff, but only with the support of the parent or guardian. In either case, the student in question concurs with the request.  The request, in writing and citing a rationale, is received by the building Principal by February 1.
  4. The student shows ability at 2.5 standard deviations above the mean through no fewer than two (2) reliable and valid testing programs.
  5. The student demonstrates achievement or performance commensurate with ability.
  6. All grade-level gifted/accelerated programming (e.g. enrichment, enhancement activities; differentiated, or tiered instruction) available to the student is exhausted.
  7. The student displays appropriate social and emotional development (through staff assessment, or an established inventory such as Renzulli) for double promotion, or potential for development.

Promotion Team
A request for double-promotion shall first be considered by a Promotion Team appointed by the building Principal, a committee consisting of teachers (preferably, those who have had, or may have the student in class), a school psychologist, a social worker, and a reading specialist.  The parent or guardian holds the right to be present during the PT’s discussion, unless the right is waived.  The PT shall convene by February 15 in order to hear the request, ask questions, etc.  It will reconvene on or before April 15, having collected the necessary data.  Taking under advisement the seven (7) “Standards,” the PT shall recommend the double, or single, promotion of the student in question to the building Principal.  The recommendation, accompanied by supporting documentation, shall be delivered to the Principal by April 20.

Principal
Upon hearing the recommendation of the Promotion Team and deliberating upon all supporting documentation, the building Principal shall make the final decision on the question of double promotion.  The decision shall be made by April 30.

Restoration to Grade
Nothing herein prohibits a student’s return to age-appropriate grade in the event double-promotion proves ineffective.

Notice
Notice, in writing and with reasons stated, shall be provided of the decision to the parent or guardian by May 5.  The parent or guardian may appeal the decision to the Superintendent and, if necessary, to the Board of Education.

Timeline

DateActivity
February 1Double promotion request is delivered to building Principal
February 15Promotion Team convenes to clarify request and order supporting data
April 15Promotion Team reconvenes, having collected supporting data and documentation, and forms a recommendation on double promotion
April 20Recommendation delivered to building Principal
April 30Building Principal makes final decision on question of double promotion
May 5Written decision delivered to parent or guardian

Extraordinary Circumstances
It is acknowledged that, given extraordinary circumstances presented by extraordinary children, the aforementioned policy, as written, may be altered in consideration of those circumstances.  Nothing herein prohibits the Board of Education from waiving certain portions, or all, of this Policy in placing a student appropriately in the school system.

Promotion Team Recommendation

Principal’s Decision

POLICY APPROVED:  November 15, 2012

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Article 655.09 – Student Classification and Enrollment – Prairie Central High School

Instruction
Student Classification and Enrollment – Prairie Central High School

All Prairie Central High School students will be classified by credits.  All incoming 8th graders and any students that have accumulated under four (4) credits shall be considered freshmen.  All students will four (4) or more credits, but less than 12 credits shall be considered sophomores.  All students with 12 or more credits, but less than 20 credits shall be considered juniors.  All students with 20 or more credits shall be considered seniors.  Due to the Prairie State Achievement Exam, a student may be classified as a junior one (1) time.  In the interest of the social as well as the intellectual well-being of each student, the courses and activities which he or she carries each year shall be determined on the basis of his or her needs and capabilities.

  1. Standard Class Load. All students will carry eight (8) classes each year.
  2. Only four (4) credits earned by correspondence/extension/Junior College may be used to fulfill graduation requirements. These must be pre-approved by the principal and the student’s counselor.
  3. One- and two-term classes are offered. Two-term classes receive one (1) Carnegie unit and each term course receives one-half (1/2) Carnegie unit for successful completion.  Driver Education receives one-fourth (1/4) credit (elective).
  4. To graduate, a student must have earned 28 credits.
  5. To participate in the commencement and baccalaureate ceremonies, students must:
    1. Have completed new fewer than 27 credits by commencement time.
    2. Enroll in one credit to be completed by the beginning of the next school term.
    3. Receive approval of the High School Principal in each instance where less than the required number of credits have been accumulated.
  6. The diploma will be awarded upon successful completion of the graduation requirements inclusive of:
    CoursesCredit
    English
    (The appropriate sequence for meeting language arts requirements is English I, English II, and English III.)
    4
    Mathematics3
    Science3
    Social Science
    (Includes two (2) terms of U.S. history and one (1) term of American government.)
    2
    Physical Education
    (Four (4) years of physical education are required for graduation. The physical requirement is waived for students who are off campus for a minimum of two (2) blocks to attend Livingston Area Career Center or to meet the work requirements of the ICE or CVE programs.)
    4
    Consumer Education.5
    Computer Science
    (Passing computer/keyboarding fundamentals satisfies this requirement.)
    .5
    Fine or Applied Arts
    (Includes art, foreign language, and vocational education.)
    1
    Health.5
    Electives9.5
    Total28
    Student must also pass exams on:
    1. The Federal Constitution
    2. The State Constitution

    Students must also complete the following:

    1. Classroom phase of Driver Education
    2. Fundamentals of Keyboarding
  7. COLLEGE PREP (Minimum Requirements) *
    CoursesCredit
    English
    (emphasizing written & oral communications, literature)
    4
    Social Studies
    (emphasizing history and government)
    3
    Mathematics
    (introductory through advanced algebra, geometry, trigonometry, or fundamentals of computer programming)
    4
    Science
    (laboratory cources)
    4
    Foreign Language, Music, Art, or Vocational2

    *Note:  Students should consult college catalogs for specific admission requirements.
  8. G.E.D. Individuals meeting the General Education Development (G.E.D.) requirements will receive certification of completion from the agency conducting the program after successful completion of the G.E.D. program requirements.  Prairie Central High School DOES NOT issue diplomas for G.E.D. programs.
  9. The Valedictorian and Salutatorian will be based on four (4) years of work.
  10. Transfer students must meet only the yearly requirements of the year(s) they enroll at Prairie Central High School and thereafter. The requirements of the school from which they transfer will be accepted as long as they are complete for each year of that school.  Any deficiencies from the prior school must be completed at Prairie Central High School.
  11. The Physical Education requirement is waived for students who are off campus for two periods to attend the Livingston Area Vocational Center or the work experience for the I.C.E./C.V.E. programs or students who are enrolled for both band and chorus courses.
  12. GRADUATION AFTER SEVEN (7) SEMESTERS. It is the policy of the Board of Education that eight (8) semesters of attendance shall be the normal requirement for graduation from Prairie Central High School.  However, the Board recognizes that special conditions might arise which could call for consideration of an alternative to the eight (8) semester attendance requirement.In order for a student to be eligible for seven (7) semester attendance, the following must be completed:
    1. The student must have met all graduation requirements.
    2. A written request should be provided to the student’s counselor indicating the intention of early graduation. This letter should be submitted by October 31 of the senior year.
    3. Have a special need and an appropriately planned educational experience (vocational school, college, military service, or on-the-job training for the remainder of the four-year period).
    4. Have written evidence of approval and acceptance of the planned educational experience including in writing, parental consent, school or employment verification, and local administrative approval.

POLICY ADOPTED: June 27, 1994
POLICY AMENDED:  April 2002
POLICY AMENDED:  January 17, 2013

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Article 655.10 – Credit for Alternative Courses and Programs, and Course Substitutions

Instruction
Credit for Alternative Courses and Programs, and Course Substitutions

Correspondence Courses
A student enrolled in a correspondence course may receive high school credit for work completed, provided:

  1. The course is given by an institution accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools;
  2. The student is a fourth or fifth year senior;
  3. The student assumes responsibility for all fees; and
  4. The Building Principal approves the course in advance.

A maximum of 6 units of credit may be counted toward the requirements for a student’s high school graduation.

Distance Learning Courses, Including Virtual or Online Courses
A student enrolled in a distance learning course, including a virtual or online course, may receive high school credit for work completed, provided:

  1. The course is offered by an institution approved by the Superintendent or designee;
  2. The course is not offered at the student’s high school;
  3. The student assumes responsibility for all fees (including tuition and textbooks); and
  4. The Building Principal approves the course in advance.

Students may be limited as to the number of distance learning courses that apply toward high school credit.  Grades earned in approved distance learning courses count toward a student’s grade point average, class rank, and eligibility for athletic and extracurricular activities.  The District may pay the fee for expelled students who are permitted to take virtual or online courses in alternative settings.

Exchange Programs
An exchange student will be granted a diploma if he or she completes the criteria for graduation established by the State of Illinois and the School Board.  The Board may grant a certificate of attendance to exchange students.

District students will receive high school credit for foreign exchange courses that meet the criteria established in the curriculum and that are approved by the Building Principal.  International study course work not meeting District requirements may be placed in the student’s permanent record and recorded as an international study experience.

Summer School and Independent Study
A student will receive high school credit for successfully completing:  (1) any course given by an institution accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, and (2) independent study in a curriculum area not offered by the District, provided the student obtains the consent of a supervising teacher as well as the Building Principal.

College Courses
A student who successfully completes community college courses may receive high school credit, provided:

  1. The student is a senior in good academic standing;
  2. The course is not offered in the high school curriculum;
  3. The course is approved in advance by the student’s guidance counselor and the High School Principal; and
  4. The student assumes responsibility for all fees.

A maximum of 6 units of credit may be counted toward the requirements for a student’s high school graduation.

Dual Credit Courses
A student who successfully completes a dual credit course may receive credit at both the college and high school level.

Foreign Language Courses
A student will receive high school credit by studying foreign language in an approved ethnic school program, provided such program meets the minimum standards established by the State Board of Education.

The amount of credit will be based on foreign language proficiency achieved.  The Building Principal may require a student seeking foreign language credit to successfully complete a foreign language proficiency examination.

Military Service
The Board may accept military service experience as credit toward graduation, provided the student making the request has a recommendation from the U.S. Commission of Accreditation of Service Experiences.  The student seeking credit shall supply any documents or transcripts necessary to support the request.

Volunteer Service Credit Program
A student may earn high school credit through community service activities.  The Superintendent shall implement the volunteer service credit program to ensure student enrichment, educational growth, and personal welfare.  Students shall receive the amount of credit given for the completion of one semester of language arts, math, science, or social studies.

Youth Apprenticeship Vocational Education Program (Tech Prep)
Students participating in the Youth Apprenticeship Vocational Education Program (Tech Prep) may earn credit toward graduation for work-related training received at manufacturing facilities or agencies.

Vocational Academy
Students enrolled in the Vocational Academy earn credit toward graduation as provided in the Academy’s design.

Substitutions for Physical Education and Other Required Courses
A student in grades 9-12 may satisfy one or more high school courses (including physical education) or graduation requirements by successfully completing related vocational or technical education courses if:

  1. The Building Principal approves the substitution and the vocational or technical education course is completely described in curriculum material along with its relationship to the required course; and
  2. The student’s parent/guardian request and approve the substitution in writing on forms provided by the District.

A student in grades 9-12, unless otherwise stated, may submit a written request to the Building Principal to be excused from physical education courses for the reasons stated below. The Superintendent or designee shall maintain records showing that the criteria set forth in this policy were applied to the student’s individual circumstances.

  1. Enrollment in a marching band program for credit;
  2. Enrollment in Reserve Officer’s Training Corps (ROTC) program sponsored by the District;
  3. Ongoing participation in an interscholastic athletic program (student must be in the 11th or 12th grade);
  4. Enrollment in academic classes that are required for admission to an institution of higher learning (student must be in the 11th or 12th grade); or
  5. Enrollment in academic classes that are required for graduation from high school, provided that failure to take such classes will result in the student being unable to graduate (student must be in the 11th or 12th grade).

A student in grades 3-12 who is eligible for special education may be excused from physical education courses if:

  1. The student’s parent/guardian agrees that the student must utilize the time set aside for physical education to receive special education support and services, or
  2. The student’s individualized education program team determines that the student must utilize the time set aside for physical education to receive special education support and services.

The agreement or determination must be made a part of the individualized education program.  A student requiring adapted physical education must receive that service in accordance with the student’s individualized education program.

LEGAL REF.: 105 ILCS 5/2-3.44, 5/2-3.108, 5/2-3.115, 5/2-3.142, 5/10-22.43a, 5/27-6, 5/27-22.3, and 5/27-22.05.
23 Ill.Admin.Code §§1.420(p), 1.440(f), and 1.470(c).

POLICY APPROVED: August, 2000
POLICY AMENDED:  January 17, 2013

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Article 660 – Student Testing and Assessment Program

Instruction
Student Testing and Assessment Program

The District student assessment program provides information for determining individual student achievement and instructional needs; curriculum and instruction effectiveness; and school performance measured against District student learning objectives and statewide norms.

The Superintendent or designee shall manage the student assessment program that, at a minimum:

  1. Uses the State assessment system and any other appropriate assessment methods and instruments, including norm and criterion-referenced achievement tests, aptitude tests, proficiency tests, and teacher-developed tests.
  2. Tests the grades and subjects according to the schedule required by the State assessment system. The District’s assessment program may include testing students in grades not required by State law to be tested.
  3. Tracks the achievement of all students.
  4. Provides each student and his or her parents/custodians with an evaluation of the student’s learning on the basis of test and assessment results.
  5. Utilizes professional testing practices.

Overall student assessment data on tests required by State law will be aggregated by the District and reported, along with other information, on the District’s annual report card.

LEGAL REF.: Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, 20 U.S.C. §1232g.
105 ILCS 5/2-3.63, 5/2-3.64, 5/10-17a, and 5/27-1.

POLICY APPROVED: July 25, 1986
POLICY AMENDED:  January 17, 2013

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Article 680 – Extra-Curricular and Co-Curricular Activities

Instruction
Extra-Curricular and Co-Curricular Activities

The Superintendent must approve an activity in order for it to be considered a District-sponsored extracurricular or co-curricular activity, using the following criteria:

  1. The activity will contribute to the leadership abilities, social well-being, self-realization, good citizenship, or general growth of student-participants.
  2. Fees assessed students are reasonable and do not exceed the actual cost of operation.
  3. The District has sufficient financial resources for the activity.
  4. Requests from students.
  5. The activity will be supervised by a school-approved sponsor.

Interscholastic Activities
Interscholastic activities, the participation in which would subject a student to eligibility and random drug-testing programs, are defined as those events involving two (2) or more schools in competition, including but limited to those events organized under the auspices of the Illinois Elementary School Association or the Illinois High School Association. Other co-curricular participation will be governed by Student Handbooks.

Academic Criteria for Participation
For students in kindergarten through 8th grade, selection of members or participants is at the discretion of the teachers, sponsors, or coaches, provided that the selection criteria conform to the District’s policies. Students must satisfy all academic standards and must comply with the activity’s rules and the student conduct code.

For high school students, selection of members or participants is at the discretion of the teachers, sponsors, or coaches, provided that the selection criteria conform to the District’s policies. Participation in co-curricular activities is dependent upon course selection and successful progress in those courses. In order to be eligible to participate in any school-sponsored or school-supported athletic or extracurricular activity, a student must maintain an overall grade point average as defined in Student Handbooks. Any student-participant failing to meet these academic criteria shall be suspended from the activity until the specified academic criteria are met, whichever is longer, as defined in Student Handbooks.

LEGAL REF.: 105 ILCS 5/10-20.30 and 5/24-24; Illinois High School Association By-Laws; Illinois Elementary Association By-Laws

POLICY ADOPTED: July 20, 1998
POLICY AMENDED: April 18, 2013

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Article 680-AP – Administrative Procedure – Extra-Curricular and Co-Curricular Activities

Instruction
Administrative Procedure – Extra-Curricular and Co-Curricular Activities
ActorAction
Building PrincipalInclude the minimum academic criteria for participation in Student Handbooks.
Coach or SponsorExplain the minimum academic criteria for participation to student-participants.
StudentIn order to be eligible to participate, maintain an overall grade point average as defined by Student Handbooks.
Coach or SponsorBefore allowing a student to join an extracurricular activity, ensure that the student meets the academic criteria.
Building Principal or designeeAt the end of each grade-reporting period, arrange for all coaches and sponsors to have access to their student-participants’ grades and grade point averages.
Coach or SponsorAt the end of each grade-reporting period, determine whether any student(s) failed to meet the academic criteria.
For any student who fails to meet the academic criteria:
Determine how long the student will be suspended from the activity; explain to the student the reason for the suspension; send a notice of the suspension to the student’s parent(s)/guardian(s).
For any student suspended for not meeting the academic criteria:
At the end of the suspension, determine whether the student now meets the District’s academic criteria. If so, notify the student and the student’s parent(s)/guardian(s) that the student is now eligible to participate.
For the student who continues not to meet these criteria:
Notify the student’s parent(s)/guardian(s) that the student will remain ineligible to participate until the student meets the academic criteria.

POLICY AMENDED: April 18, 2013

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Article 681 – Recognition Policy

Instruction
Recognition Policy

Athletic team and individual recognition will be offered with the following criteria (Prairie Central era only):
Junior High

  1. A gym banner for IESA state-recognized athletic teams.
  2. A framed picture in the trophy case for an individual participating in IESA state tournament and receiving state recognition – including the individual’s name, year, sport, and accomplishment.
  3. Team pictures mounted in gym hallway each year.

High School

  1. A banner in the main gym to recognize a state ranked team or individual.
  2. A banner in the main gym to recognize conference championships – 8 x 8 board in the northeast corner of the gym next to the mascot.

POLICY APPROVED: February 21, 2013

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Article 682 – Charter Bus Policy

Instruction
Charter Bus Policy

In order to bring uniformity related to individual or department requests for charter busing rather than regular school buses, the following was developed as guidelines:

  1. Transportation provided by the District will utilize school buses or school vans.
  2. Charter busing may be considered for the following:
    1. An event in excess of 220 miles round trip;
    2. An event that is held at night;
    3. An event that does not include an overnight;
    4. An event that is not a field trip; and
    5. One (1) charter event per department or organization per year.
  3. The organization/department is responsible for paying the difference between the cost of District transportation and the charter.
  4. POLICY ADOPTED: November, 2001
    POLICY AMENDED: April 18, 2013

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